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Nodding syndrome in Kitgum District, Uganda: association with conflict and internal displacement.

Landis JL, Palmer VS, Spencer PS - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Data were obtained from publicly available information reported by the Ugandan Ministry of Health (MOH), the Armed Conflict Location & Event Data (ACLED) Project of the University of Sussex in the UK, peer-reviewed publications in professional journals and other sources.Reports of Nodding syndrome began to appear in 1997, with the first recorded cases in Kitgum District in 1998.Cases rapidly increased annually beginning in 2001, with peaks in 2003-2005 and 2008, 5-6 years after peaks in the number of wartime conflicts and deaths.

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Affiliation: Global Health Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.

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Kitgum District (centre), northern Uganda, one of three districts heavily impacted by Nodding syndrome.
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BMJOPEN2014006195F1: Kitgum District (centre), northern Uganda, one of three districts heavily impacted by Nodding syndrome.

Mentions: We examine annual MOH reports of NS cases in relation to regional wartime conflict, casualties and household displacement in Kitgum District (figure 1). We find a delayed temporal association between peaks in conflict events and deaths. Peaks of reported NS also correlate with peaks of household displacement and prolonged residence in camps for internally displaced people (IDP), where residents were heavily dependent on food aid.13 The camps were insecure, unsanitary and squalid, and morbidity and mortality rates were high.14 Starting in the mid-1990s, these camps were established by the government of Uganda with the goal of protecting people from the LRA, including an estimated 285 000 from Kitgum District.15


Nodding syndrome in Kitgum District, Uganda: association with conflict and internal displacement.

Landis JL, Palmer VS, Spencer PS - BMJ Open (2014)

Kitgum District (centre), northern Uganda, one of three districts heavily impacted by Nodding syndrome.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4225239&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006195F1: Kitgum District (centre), northern Uganda, one of three districts heavily impacted by Nodding syndrome.
Mentions: We examine annual MOH reports of NS cases in relation to regional wartime conflict, casualties and household displacement in Kitgum District (figure 1). We find a delayed temporal association between peaks in conflict events and deaths. Peaks of reported NS also correlate with peaks of household displacement and prolonged residence in camps for internally displaced people (IDP), where residents were heavily dependent on food aid.13 The camps were insecure, unsanitary and squalid, and morbidity and mortality rates were high.14 Starting in the mid-1990s, these camps were established by the government of Uganda with the goal of protecting people from the LRA, including an estimated 285 000 from Kitgum District.15

Bottom Line: Data were obtained from publicly available information reported by the Ugandan Ministry of Health (MOH), the Armed Conflict Location & Event Data (ACLED) Project of the University of Sussex in the UK, peer-reviewed publications in professional journals and other sources.Reports of Nodding syndrome began to appear in 1997, with the first recorded cases in Kitgum District in 1998.Cases rapidly increased annually beginning in 2001, with peaks in 2003-2005 and 2008, 5-6 years after peaks in the number of wartime conflicts and deaths.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Global Health Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus