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Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

Li M, Fan Y, Zhang X, Hou W, Tang Z - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Studies published before February 2014 identified through electronic searches using PubMed and Embase.The combined estimates showed no significant benefits of increasing the consumption of fruit and vegetables combined.Higher fruit or green leafy vegetables intake is associated with a significantly reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, People's Republic of China.

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Process of literature search and study selection.
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BMJOPEN2014005497F1: Process of literature search and study selection.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the results of literature research and selection. We identified 308 articles from PubMed and 365 articles from Embase. After exclusion of duplicate records and studies that did not fulfil our inclusion criteria, 27 articles remained, and we further evaluated the full texts of these 27 publications. Of these, we excluded 17 studies as follows. Five articles were excluded owing to lack of sufficient data for estimation of relative risks.26–30 Five articles were excluded because no original data could be extracted (review, type 1 diabetes or cross-sectional studies).31–35 Another four articles were excluded because we deemed them to be irrelevant.36–39 We also excluded three articles because they did not give enough details on fruit, vegetables, or fruit and vegetables intake to warrant inclusion within the meta-analysis.40–42 Finally, 10 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis.5710111543–47 Among these articles, two studies provided information on males and females separately;711 the article by Cooper et al was divided into two studies (study a:2012 and study b:2012); and another paper reported data from two independent cohorts.15 Thus, our meta-analysis included 13 comparisons.


Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

Li M, Fan Y, Zhang X, Hou W, Tang Z - BMJ Open (2014)

Process of literature search and study selection.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4225228&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005497F1: Process of literature search and study selection.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the results of literature research and selection. We identified 308 articles from PubMed and 365 articles from Embase. After exclusion of duplicate records and studies that did not fulfil our inclusion criteria, 27 articles remained, and we further evaluated the full texts of these 27 publications. Of these, we excluded 17 studies as follows. Five articles were excluded owing to lack of sufficient data for estimation of relative risks.26–30 Five articles were excluded because no original data could be extracted (review, type 1 diabetes or cross-sectional studies).31–35 Another four articles were excluded because we deemed them to be irrelevant.36–39 We also excluded three articles because they did not give enough details on fruit, vegetables, or fruit and vegetables intake to warrant inclusion within the meta-analysis.40–42 Finally, 10 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis.5710111543–47 Among these articles, two studies provided information on males and females separately;711 the article by Cooper et al was divided into two studies (study a:2012 and study b:2012); and another paper reported data from two independent cohorts.15 Thus, our meta-analysis included 13 comparisons.

Bottom Line: Studies published before February 2014 identified through electronic searches using PubMed and Embase.The combined estimates showed no significant benefits of increasing the consumption of fruit and vegetables combined.Higher fruit or green leafy vegetables intake is associated with a significantly reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, People's Republic of China.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus