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The Difference in Comorbidities and Behavioral Aspects between Internet Abuse and Internet Dependence in Korean Male Adolescents.

Lee JY, Park EJ, Kwon M, Choi JH, Jeong JE, Choi JS, Choi SW, Lee CU, Kim DJ - Psychiatry Investig (2014)

Bottom Line: Significant differences were observed in three items between the abuse and dependence groups, but there were no significant differences between the non-addict and abuse groups.In terms of behavioral aspects, scores for abusive, sexual, and decreased social interest behaviors were highest in the dependence group, and lowest in the non-addict group.However, the behavioral aspects of decreased interpersonal relationships did not show this difference between groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sungil Mental Hospital, Namwon, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study examined the differences in psychiatric comorbidities and behavioral aspects in accordance with the severity of Internet addiction in male adolescents.

Methods: One hundred and twenty-five adolescents from four middle and high schools in Seoul were enrolled in this study. The subjects were divided into non-addict, abuse, and dependence groups according to a diagnostic interview by psychiatrists. The psychiatric comorbidities and behavioral aspects of subjects were evaluated through psychiatric clinical interviews based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition), the Children's Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Internet Addiction Test, and a self-reported questionnaire about behavioral aspects.

Results: The psychiatric comorbidity distributions were significantly different in the abuse and dependence groups, particularly in terms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and mood disorder items. The Children's Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Internet Addiction Test scores were also significantly different among the three groups. There were significant differences in 10 of the 20 items of the Internet Addiction Test between the non-addict, abuse, and dependence groups. There were significant differences in seven items between the non-addict and abuse groups, but no differences between subjects in the abuse and dependence groups. Significant differences were observed in three items between the abuse and dependence groups, but there were no significant differences between the non-addict and abuse groups. In terms of behavioral aspects, scores for abusive, sexual, and decreased social interest behaviors were highest in the dependence group, and lowest in the non-addict group. However, the behavioral aspects of decreased interpersonal relationships did not show this difference between groups.

Conclusion: This study suggests that there are differences in psychiatric comorbidities and behavioral aspects between adolescent males with characteristics of Internet abuse and Internet dependence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Differences in the CDI, TA, SA and IAT scores between the non-addict, abuse, and dependence groups. ANOVA with post hoc multiple comparisons and Bonferroni adjustments was used for analysis. *p<0.001, **p<0.01, ***p<0.05. IAT: internet addiction test, CDI: the Children's Depression Inventory, TA: trait anxiety, SA: state anxiety, ANOVA: analysis of variance.
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Figure 2: Differences in the CDI, TA, SA and IAT scores between the non-addict, abuse, and dependence groups. ANOVA with post hoc multiple comparisons and Bonferroni adjustments was used for analysis. *p<0.001, **p<0.01, ***p<0.05. IAT: internet addiction test, CDI: the Children's Depression Inventory, TA: trait anxiety, SA: state anxiety, ANOVA: analysis of variance.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the differences in CDI, trait anxiety, state anxiety, and IAT scores between the groups. The CDI, trait anxiety, and IAT scores increased in the order of non-addict, abuse, and dependence groups, but the state anxiety scores did not. There were significant differences between each group in the CDI items regarding negative thoughts of self and the future, low self-esteem, suicidal ideation, insomnia, loss of appetite, loss of interest in activities, and difficulty with peer relationships. In particular, there were significant differences in low self-esteem, negative thoughts of the future, and suicidal ideation between the abuse and dependence groups.


The Difference in Comorbidities and Behavioral Aspects between Internet Abuse and Internet Dependence in Korean Male Adolescents.

Lee JY, Park EJ, Kwon M, Choi JH, Jeong JE, Choi JS, Choi SW, Lee CU, Kim DJ - Psychiatry Investig (2014)

Differences in the CDI, TA, SA and IAT scores between the non-addict, abuse, and dependence groups. ANOVA with post hoc multiple comparisons and Bonferroni adjustments was used for analysis. *p<0.001, **p<0.01, ***p<0.05. IAT: internet addiction test, CDI: the Children's Depression Inventory, TA: trait anxiety, SA: state anxiety, ANOVA: analysis of variance.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4225202&req=5

Figure 2: Differences in the CDI, TA, SA and IAT scores between the non-addict, abuse, and dependence groups. ANOVA with post hoc multiple comparisons and Bonferroni adjustments was used for analysis. *p<0.001, **p<0.01, ***p<0.05. IAT: internet addiction test, CDI: the Children's Depression Inventory, TA: trait anxiety, SA: state anxiety, ANOVA: analysis of variance.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the differences in CDI, trait anxiety, state anxiety, and IAT scores between the groups. The CDI, trait anxiety, and IAT scores increased in the order of non-addict, abuse, and dependence groups, but the state anxiety scores did not. There were significant differences between each group in the CDI items regarding negative thoughts of self and the future, low self-esteem, suicidal ideation, insomnia, loss of appetite, loss of interest in activities, and difficulty with peer relationships. In particular, there were significant differences in low self-esteem, negative thoughts of the future, and suicidal ideation between the abuse and dependence groups.

Bottom Line: Significant differences were observed in three items between the abuse and dependence groups, but there were no significant differences between the non-addict and abuse groups.In terms of behavioral aspects, scores for abusive, sexual, and decreased social interest behaviors were highest in the dependence group, and lowest in the non-addict group.However, the behavioral aspects of decreased interpersonal relationships did not show this difference between groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sungil Mental Hospital, Namwon, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study examined the differences in psychiatric comorbidities and behavioral aspects in accordance with the severity of Internet addiction in male adolescents.

Methods: One hundred and twenty-five adolescents from four middle and high schools in Seoul were enrolled in this study. The subjects were divided into non-addict, abuse, and dependence groups according to a diagnostic interview by psychiatrists. The psychiatric comorbidities and behavioral aspects of subjects were evaluated through psychiatric clinical interviews based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition), the Children's Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Internet Addiction Test, and a self-reported questionnaire about behavioral aspects.

Results: The psychiatric comorbidity distributions were significantly different in the abuse and dependence groups, particularly in terms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and mood disorder items. The Children's Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Internet Addiction Test scores were also significantly different among the three groups. There were significant differences in 10 of the 20 items of the Internet Addiction Test between the non-addict, abuse, and dependence groups. There were significant differences in seven items between the non-addict and abuse groups, but no differences between subjects in the abuse and dependence groups. Significant differences were observed in three items between the abuse and dependence groups, but there were no significant differences between the non-addict and abuse groups. In terms of behavioral aspects, scores for abusive, sexual, and decreased social interest behaviors were highest in the dependence group, and lowest in the non-addict group. However, the behavioral aspects of decreased interpersonal relationships did not show this difference between groups.

Conclusion: This study suggests that there are differences in psychiatric comorbidities and behavioral aspects between adolescent males with characteristics of Internet abuse and Internet dependence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus