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Localizing movement-related primary sensorimotor cortices with multi-band EEG frequency changes and functional MRI.

Kuo CC, Luu P, Morgan KK, Dow M, Davey C, Song J, Malony AD, Tucker DM - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: In the present study, five participants performed similar thumb and finger movement tasks in parallel EEG and functional MRI studies.We examined changes in five frequency bands (from 5-120 Hz) and localized them using 256 dense-array EEG (dEEG) recordings and high-resolution individual head models.Results showed that beta-band (14-30 Hz) desynchronizations (power decreases) were the most robust effects, appearing in all individuals, consistently localized to the hand region of the primary motor cortex, and consistently aligned with fMRI localizations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electrical Geodesics, Inc., Eugene, Oregon, United States of America; NeuroInformatics Center, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations in multiple frequency bands can be observed during functional activity of the cerebral cortex. An important question is whether activity of focal areas of cortex, such as during finger movements, is tracked by focal oscillatory EEG changes. Although a number of studies have compared EEG changes to functional MRI hemodynamic responses, we can find no previous research that relates the fMRI hemodynamic activity to localization of the multiple EEG frequency changes observed in motor tasks. In the present study, five participants performed similar thumb and finger movement tasks in parallel EEG and functional MRI studies. We examined changes in five frequency bands (from 5-120 Hz) and localized them using 256 dense-array EEG (dEEG) recordings and high-resolution individual head models. These localizations were compared with fMRI localizations in the same participants. Results showed that beta-band (14-30 Hz) desynchronizations (power decreases) were the most robust effects, appearing in all individuals, consistently localized to the hand region of the primary motor cortex, and consistently aligned with fMRI localizations.

No MeSH data available.


Time-course of average EEG trace (i.e., event-related potential) from channel C3 (bandpass: 1–120 Hz) during right thumb movement in one subject.Color bars on horizontal axis mark categorical time periods (see text).
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pone-0112103-g002: Time-course of average EEG trace (i.e., event-related potential) from channel C3 (bandpass: 1–120 Hz) during right thumb movement in one subject.Color bars on horizontal axis mark categorical time periods (see text).

Mentions: Figure 2 presents the ERP recorded from an electrode over the contralateral motor cortex for a single subject. Familiar movement-related potentials can be observed in the movement execution period, particularly the negative going potential prior to the button press and positive peaks following the response [19]. Time-frequency analysis of individual trials that make up the ERP capture not only the frequency specific changes that are phase-locked to the response but also the non-phase locked features, providing a more detailed and comprehensive view of the brain changes associated with motor control. Although there are important motor-related low-frequency activities [53], low-frequency information requires a longer time interval. Because of the requirement for more data, it is difficult to obtain enough artifact-free trials at these longer intervals for analysis. Therefore, following time-frequency analyses are focused on frequency bands above 4 Hz.


Localizing movement-related primary sensorimotor cortices with multi-band EEG frequency changes and functional MRI.

Kuo CC, Luu P, Morgan KK, Dow M, Davey C, Song J, Malony AD, Tucker DM - PLoS ONE (2014)

Time-course of average EEG trace (i.e., event-related potential) from channel C3 (bandpass: 1–120 Hz) during right thumb movement in one subject.Color bars on horizontal axis mark categorical time periods (see text).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222972&req=5

pone-0112103-g002: Time-course of average EEG trace (i.e., event-related potential) from channel C3 (bandpass: 1–120 Hz) during right thumb movement in one subject.Color bars on horizontal axis mark categorical time periods (see text).
Mentions: Figure 2 presents the ERP recorded from an electrode over the contralateral motor cortex for a single subject. Familiar movement-related potentials can be observed in the movement execution period, particularly the negative going potential prior to the button press and positive peaks following the response [19]. Time-frequency analysis of individual trials that make up the ERP capture not only the frequency specific changes that are phase-locked to the response but also the non-phase locked features, providing a more detailed and comprehensive view of the brain changes associated with motor control. Although there are important motor-related low-frequency activities [53], low-frequency information requires a longer time interval. Because of the requirement for more data, it is difficult to obtain enough artifact-free trials at these longer intervals for analysis. Therefore, following time-frequency analyses are focused on frequency bands above 4 Hz.

Bottom Line: In the present study, five participants performed similar thumb and finger movement tasks in parallel EEG and functional MRI studies.We examined changes in five frequency bands (from 5-120 Hz) and localized them using 256 dense-array EEG (dEEG) recordings and high-resolution individual head models.Results showed that beta-band (14-30 Hz) desynchronizations (power decreases) were the most robust effects, appearing in all individuals, consistently localized to the hand region of the primary motor cortex, and consistently aligned with fMRI localizations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electrical Geodesics, Inc., Eugene, Oregon, United States of America; NeuroInformatics Center, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations in multiple frequency bands can be observed during functional activity of the cerebral cortex. An important question is whether activity of focal areas of cortex, such as during finger movements, is tracked by focal oscillatory EEG changes. Although a number of studies have compared EEG changes to functional MRI hemodynamic responses, we can find no previous research that relates the fMRI hemodynamic activity to localization of the multiple EEG frequency changes observed in motor tasks. In the present study, five participants performed similar thumb and finger movement tasks in parallel EEG and functional MRI studies. We examined changes in five frequency bands (from 5-120 Hz) and localized them using 256 dense-array EEG (dEEG) recordings and high-resolution individual head models. These localizations were compared with fMRI localizations in the same participants. Results showed that beta-band (14-30 Hz) desynchronizations (power decreases) were the most robust effects, appearing in all individuals, consistently localized to the hand region of the primary motor cortex, and consistently aligned with fMRI localizations.

No MeSH data available.