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The positive regulatory roles of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress.

Zhu D, Li R, Liu X, Sun M, Wu J, Zhang N, Zhu Y - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: We also revealed that ectopic expression of GsTIFY10a in Medicago sativa promoted plant growth, and increased the NADP-ME activity, citric acid content and free proline content but decreased the MDA content of transgenic plants under alkaline stress.In addition, we showed that neither GsTIFY10a nor GsTIFY10e exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells.Taken together, our results provided direct evidence supporting the positive regulatory roles of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Life Science, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao, P.R. China; Plant Bioengineering Laboratory, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
The TIFY family is a novel plant-specific protein family, and is characterized by a conserved TIFY motif (TIFF/YXG). Our previous studies indicated the potential roles of TIFY10/11 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. In the current study, we focused on the regulatory roles and possible physiological and molecular basis of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. We demonstrated the positive function of TIFY10s in alkaline responses by using the AtTIFY10a and AtTIFY10b knockout Arabidopsis, as evidenced by the relatively lower germination rates of attify10a and attify10b mutant seeds under alkaline stress. We also revealed that ectopic expression of GsTIFY10a in Medicago sativa promoted plant growth, and increased the NADP-ME activity, citric acid content and free proline content but decreased the MDA content of transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Furthermore, expression levels of the stress responsive genes including NADP-ME, CS, H+-ppase and P5CS were also up-regulated in GsTIFY10a transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Interestingly, GsTIFY10a overexpression increased the jasmonate content of the transgenic alfalfa. In addition, we showed that neither GsTIFY10a nor GsTIFY10e exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells. However, through Y2H and BiFc assays, we demonstrated that GsTIFY10a, not GsTIFY10e, could form homodimers in yeast cells and in living plant cells. As expected, we also demonstrated that GsTIFY10a and GsTIFY10e could heterodimerize with each other in both yeast and plant cells. Taken together, our results provided direct evidence supporting the positive regulatory roles of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress.

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The Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 subgroup proteins.a. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 subgroup proteins. A neighbor-joining tree was constructed with the full-length TIFY10/11 protein sequences by using MEGA 5.0. b. Exon/intron structures of the Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 genes. Exons were represented by blue boxes, and grey lines connecting two exons represented introns. Both the exons and introns were drawn to scale. c. The distribution of conserved domains within Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 proteins. The relative positions of each conserved domain within each protein were shown in color.
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pone-0111984-g002: The Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 subgroup proteins.a. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 subgroup proteins. A neighbor-joining tree was constructed with the full-length TIFY10/11 protein sequences by using MEGA 5.0. b. Exon/intron structures of the Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 genes. Exons were represented by blue boxes, and grey lines connecting two exons represented introns. Both the exons and introns were drawn to scale. c. The distribution of conserved domains within Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 proteins. The relative positions of each conserved domain within each protein were shown in color.

Mentions: As shown in Fig. 1, the TIFY10/11 subgroup comprises 8 members in Glycine soja and 4 members in Arabidopsis. Protein sequence analyses showed that all TIFY10/11 proteins contained two highly conserved domains: a ZIM/TIFY domain which mediated homo- and hetero-dimerization, and a Jas domain which played a critical role in repression of JA signaling. It is worth noted that except for GsTIFY10e and GsTIFY10f, all other TIFY10/11 proteins included an N-terminal domain (Fig. 1, Fig. 2C). We further examined the phylogenetic relationship of TIFY10/11s in Glycine soja and Arabidopsis thaliana. As shown in Fig. 2A, TIFY10/11 proteins were divided into two branches (TIFY10 and TIFY11). GsTIFY10a and GsTIFY10b, GsTIFY10c and GsTIFY10d, GsTIFY10e and GsTIFY10f were closely related with each other, respectively. Among the TIFY10 proteins, GsTIFY10a/b/c/d exhibited high similarity in exon distribution (Fig. 2B), amino acid sequence and domain architecture (Fig. 2C).


The positive regulatory roles of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress.

Zhu D, Li R, Liu X, Sun M, Wu J, Zhang N, Zhu Y - PLoS ONE (2014)

The Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 subgroup proteins.a. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 subgroup proteins. A neighbor-joining tree was constructed with the full-length TIFY10/11 protein sequences by using MEGA 5.0. b. Exon/intron structures of the Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 genes. Exons were represented by blue boxes, and grey lines connecting two exons represented introns. Both the exons and introns were drawn to scale. c. The distribution of conserved domains within Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 proteins. The relative positions of each conserved domain within each protein were shown in color.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222965&req=5

pone-0111984-g002: The Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 subgroup proteins.a. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 subgroup proteins. A neighbor-joining tree was constructed with the full-length TIFY10/11 protein sequences by using MEGA 5.0. b. Exon/intron structures of the Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 genes. Exons were represented by blue boxes, and grey lines connecting two exons represented introns. Both the exons and introns were drawn to scale. c. The distribution of conserved domains within Arabidopsis and wild soybean TIFY10/11 proteins. The relative positions of each conserved domain within each protein were shown in color.
Mentions: As shown in Fig. 1, the TIFY10/11 subgroup comprises 8 members in Glycine soja and 4 members in Arabidopsis. Protein sequence analyses showed that all TIFY10/11 proteins contained two highly conserved domains: a ZIM/TIFY domain which mediated homo- and hetero-dimerization, and a Jas domain which played a critical role in repression of JA signaling. It is worth noted that except for GsTIFY10e and GsTIFY10f, all other TIFY10/11 proteins included an N-terminal domain (Fig. 1, Fig. 2C). We further examined the phylogenetic relationship of TIFY10/11s in Glycine soja and Arabidopsis thaliana. As shown in Fig. 2A, TIFY10/11 proteins were divided into two branches (TIFY10 and TIFY11). GsTIFY10a and GsTIFY10b, GsTIFY10c and GsTIFY10d, GsTIFY10e and GsTIFY10f were closely related with each other, respectively. Among the TIFY10 proteins, GsTIFY10a/b/c/d exhibited high similarity in exon distribution (Fig. 2B), amino acid sequence and domain architecture (Fig. 2C).

Bottom Line: We also revealed that ectopic expression of GsTIFY10a in Medicago sativa promoted plant growth, and increased the NADP-ME activity, citric acid content and free proline content but decreased the MDA content of transgenic plants under alkaline stress.In addition, we showed that neither GsTIFY10a nor GsTIFY10e exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells.Taken together, our results provided direct evidence supporting the positive regulatory roles of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Life Science, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao, P.R. China; Plant Bioengineering Laboratory, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
The TIFY family is a novel plant-specific protein family, and is characterized by a conserved TIFY motif (TIFF/YXG). Our previous studies indicated the potential roles of TIFY10/11 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. In the current study, we focused on the regulatory roles and possible physiological and molecular basis of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. We demonstrated the positive function of TIFY10s in alkaline responses by using the AtTIFY10a and AtTIFY10b knockout Arabidopsis, as evidenced by the relatively lower germination rates of attify10a and attify10b mutant seeds under alkaline stress. We also revealed that ectopic expression of GsTIFY10a in Medicago sativa promoted plant growth, and increased the NADP-ME activity, citric acid content and free proline content but decreased the MDA content of transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Furthermore, expression levels of the stress responsive genes including NADP-ME, CS, H+-ppase and P5CS were also up-regulated in GsTIFY10a transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Interestingly, GsTIFY10a overexpression increased the jasmonate content of the transgenic alfalfa. In addition, we showed that neither GsTIFY10a nor GsTIFY10e exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells. However, through Y2H and BiFc assays, we demonstrated that GsTIFY10a, not GsTIFY10e, could form homodimers in yeast cells and in living plant cells. As expected, we also demonstrated that GsTIFY10a and GsTIFY10e could heterodimerize with each other in both yeast and plant cells. Taken together, our results provided direct evidence supporting the positive regulatory roles of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus