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Dietary iron does not impact the quality of life of patients with quiescent ulcerative colitis: an observational study.

Tolkien Z, Pereira DI, Prassmayer L, Fitt E, Pot G, Greenfield SM, Powell JJ - Nutr J (2013)

Bottom Line: For UC patients the linear relationship between dietary iron intakes and the scores from the disease specific inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) was also considered.The picture was similar for the 42 quiescent UC patients when disease-specific IBDQ was used.However, the 6 patients who relapsed during the study again showed an inverse association between IBDQ and dietary iron intake (p = 0.03).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, Cambridge, UK. jonathan.powell@mrc-hnr.cam.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: In animal models, excess luminal iron exacerbates colonic inflammation and cancer development. Moreover, in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients with mild to moderate disease activity dietary fortificant iron intake is inversely related to quality of life. Here we sought to determine whether dietary iron intakes were also related to quality of life in IBD patients in remission.

Methods: Forty eight patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 42 of which had quiescent disease during this observational study, and 53 healthy control subjects completed quality of life questionnaires and 7-day food diaries. For comparative analysis, 34/group were matched and the linear relationship between dietary iron intakes (total, haem, non-haem or fortificant) and EuroQol quality of life measures was investigated. For UC patients the linear relationship between dietary iron intakes and the scores from the disease specific inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) was also considered.

Results: The intake of dietary iron, and its various sub-fractions, were not associated with quality of life (EuroQol) in patients with quiescent disease or in healthy control subjects. The picture was similar for the 42 quiescent UC patients when disease-specific IBDQ was used. However, the 6 patients who relapsed during the study again showed an inverse association between IBDQ and dietary iron intake (p = 0.03).

Conclusions: Our data suggest that dietary iron does not impact on quality of life in quiescent UC patients but support that, once the disease is triggered, luminal iron may be a permissive factor for exacerbation of disease activity resulting in lower quality of life.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Study participants flow chart. From the 236 initially responding subjects 133 decided not to take part when they received more detail of study. The 2 patients that did not complete the study did so for reasons unrelated to the study.
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Figure 1: Study participants flow chart. From the 236 initially responding subjects 133 decided not to take part when they received more detail of study. The 2 patients that did not complete the study did so for reasons unrelated to the study.

Mentions: A total of 103 subjects were enrolled in the study (Figure 1). Of the UC cases that completed the study 26 were male (54%) and 22 were female (46%) with a mean age (range) of 50 (23–78) years. Of the healthy controls 26 were male (49%) and 27 were female (51%) with a mean age (range) of 41 (20–76) years. The differences between groups were not statistically significant. Six UC patients relapsed during the study and were, therefore, excluded from the main analysis. Of the remaining UC patients 34 were matched for age (within 5 years) and gender with controls.


Dietary iron does not impact the quality of life of patients with quiescent ulcerative colitis: an observational study.

Tolkien Z, Pereira DI, Prassmayer L, Fitt E, Pot G, Greenfield SM, Powell JJ - Nutr J (2013)

Study participants flow chart. From the 236 initially responding subjects 133 decided not to take part when they received more detail of study. The 2 patients that did not complete the study did so for reasons unrelated to the study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222872&req=5

Figure 1: Study participants flow chart. From the 236 initially responding subjects 133 decided not to take part when they received more detail of study. The 2 patients that did not complete the study did so for reasons unrelated to the study.
Mentions: A total of 103 subjects were enrolled in the study (Figure 1). Of the UC cases that completed the study 26 were male (54%) and 22 were female (46%) with a mean age (range) of 50 (23–78) years. Of the healthy controls 26 were male (49%) and 27 were female (51%) with a mean age (range) of 41 (20–76) years. The differences between groups were not statistically significant. Six UC patients relapsed during the study and were, therefore, excluded from the main analysis. Of the remaining UC patients 34 were matched for age (within 5 years) and gender with controls.

Bottom Line: For UC patients the linear relationship between dietary iron intakes and the scores from the disease specific inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) was also considered.The picture was similar for the 42 quiescent UC patients when disease-specific IBDQ was used.However, the 6 patients who relapsed during the study again showed an inverse association between IBDQ and dietary iron intake (p = 0.03).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, Cambridge, UK. jonathan.powell@mrc-hnr.cam.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: In animal models, excess luminal iron exacerbates colonic inflammation and cancer development. Moreover, in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients with mild to moderate disease activity dietary fortificant iron intake is inversely related to quality of life. Here we sought to determine whether dietary iron intakes were also related to quality of life in IBD patients in remission.

Methods: Forty eight patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 42 of which had quiescent disease during this observational study, and 53 healthy control subjects completed quality of life questionnaires and 7-day food diaries. For comparative analysis, 34/group were matched and the linear relationship between dietary iron intakes (total, haem, non-haem or fortificant) and EuroQol quality of life measures was investigated. For UC patients the linear relationship between dietary iron intakes and the scores from the disease specific inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) was also considered.

Results: The intake of dietary iron, and its various sub-fractions, were not associated with quality of life (EuroQol) in patients with quiescent disease or in healthy control subjects. The picture was similar for the 42 quiescent UC patients when disease-specific IBDQ was used. However, the 6 patients who relapsed during the study again showed an inverse association between IBDQ and dietary iron intake (p = 0.03).

Conclusions: Our data suggest that dietary iron does not impact on quality of life in quiescent UC patients but support that, once the disease is triggered, luminal iron may be a permissive factor for exacerbation of disease activity resulting in lower quality of life.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus