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Voluntary modulation of anterior cingulate response to negative feedback.

Shane MS, Weywadt CR - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: On Increase and Decrease runs, participants performed the same task, but were instructed to "try to increase [decrease] their brain's response every time they received negative feedback".Results indicated that participants showed changes in dACC/mFC response under these differing instructional conditions: dACC/mFC activity following negative feedback was higher in the Increase condition, and dACC activity trended lower in the Decrease condition, compared to the Watch condition.Potential implications for neuromodulation and facilitated learning are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada; The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Anterior cingulate and medial frontal cortex (dACC/mFC) response to negative feedback represents the actions of a generalized error-monitoring system critical for the management of goal-directed behavior. Magnitude of dACC/mFC response to negative feedback correlates with levels of post-feedback behavioral change, and with proficiency of operant learning processes. With this in mind, it follows that an ability to alter dACC/mFC response to negative feedback may lead to representative changes in operant learning proficiency. To this end, the present study investigated the extent to which healthy individuals would show modulation of their dACC/mFC response when instructed to try to either maximize or minimize their neural response to the presentation of contingent negative feedback. Participants performed multiple runs of a standard time-estimation task, during which they received feedback regarding their ability to accurately estimate a one-second duration. On Watch runs, participants were simply instructed to try to estimate as closely as possible the one second duration. On Increase and Decrease runs, participants performed the same task, but were instructed to "try to increase [decrease] their brain's response every time they received negative feedback". Results indicated that participants showed changes in dACC/mFC response under these differing instructional conditions: dACC/mFC activity following negative feedback was higher in the Increase condition, and dACC activity trended lower in the Decrease condition, compared to the Watch condition. Moreover, dACC activity correlated with post-feedback performance adjustments, and these adjustments were highest in the Increase condition. Potential implications for neuromodulation and facilitated learning are discussed.

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dACC/mFC activity in response to Informative-Inaccurate feedback in each of the Watch (Figure 3a), Increase (Figure 3b), and Decrease (Figure 3c) conditions.Note that dACC activity increased in the Increase condition, and decreased in the Decrease condition, compared to the Watch condition (Figure 3d), while mFC activity increased in both Increase (significantly) and Decrease (nonsignificantly) conditions (Figure 3e).
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pone-0107322-g003: dACC/mFC activity in response to Informative-Inaccurate feedback in each of the Watch (Figure 3a), Increase (Figure 3b), and Decrease (Figure 3c) conditions.Note that dACC activity increased in the Increase condition, and decreased in the Decrease condition, compared to the Watch condition (Figure 3d), while mFC activity increased in both Increase (significantly) and Decrease (nonsignificantly) conditions (Figure 3e).

Mentions: Participants' baseline responses to error feedback were investigated by evaluating activity following Informed-Inaccurate feedback in the Watch condition. A preliminary oneway ANOVA with Feedback as a within subject variable revealed no significant clusters; however, a planned comparison of the Informed-Inaccurate > Uninformed-Inaccurate contrast revealed significant peaks of activity within both dACC and mFC ROIs, as well as within left insula (see Figure 3a and Table 2). A similar comparison of the Informed-Inaccurate > Informed-Accurate contrast revealed no significant effects.


Voluntary modulation of anterior cingulate response to negative feedback.

Shane MS, Weywadt CR - PLoS ONE (2014)

dACC/mFC activity in response to Informative-Inaccurate feedback in each of the Watch (Figure 3a), Increase (Figure 3b), and Decrease (Figure 3c) conditions.Note that dACC activity increased in the Increase condition, and decreased in the Decrease condition, compared to the Watch condition (Figure 3d), while mFC activity increased in both Increase (significantly) and Decrease (nonsignificantly) conditions (Figure 3e).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222862&req=5

pone-0107322-g003: dACC/mFC activity in response to Informative-Inaccurate feedback in each of the Watch (Figure 3a), Increase (Figure 3b), and Decrease (Figure 3c) conditions.Note that dACC activity increased in the Increase condition, and decreased in the Decrease condition, compared to the Watch condition (Figure 3d), while mFC activity increased in both Increase (significantly) and Decrease (nonsignificantly) conditions (Figure 3e).
Mentions: Participants' baseline responses to error feedback were investigated by evaluating activity following Informed-Inaccurate feedback in the Watch condition. A preliminary oneway ANOVA with Feedback as a within subject variable revealed no significant clusters; however, a planned comparison of the Informed-Inaccurate > Uninformed-Inaccurate contrast revealed significant peaks of activity within both dACC and mFC ROIs, as well as within left insula (see Figure 3a and Table 2). A similar comparison of the Informed-Inaccurate > Informed-Accurate contrast revealed no significant effects.

Bottom Line: On Increase and Decrease runs, participants performed the same task, but were instructed to "try to increase [decrease] their brain's response every time they received negative feedback".Results indicated that participants showed changes in dACC/mFC response under these differing instructional conditions: dACC/mFC activity following negative feedback was higher in the Increase condition, and dACC activity trended lower in the Decrease condition, compared to the Watch condition.Potential implications for neuromodulation and facilitated learning are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada; The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Anterior cingulate and medial frontal cortex (dACC/mFC) response to negative feedback represents the actions of a generalized error-monitoring system critical for the management of goal-directed behavior. Magnitude of dACC/mFC response to negative feedback correlates with levels of post-feedback behavioral change, and with proficiency of operant learning processes. With this in mind, it follows that an ability to alter dACC/mFC response to negative feedback may lead to representative changes in operant learning proficiency. To this end, the present study investigated the extent to which healthy individuals would show modulation of their dACC/mFC response when instructed to try to either maximize or minimize their neural response to the presentation of contingent negative feedback. Participants performed multiple runs of a standard time-estimation task, during which they received feedback regarding their ability to accurately estimate a one-second duration. On Watch runs, participants were simply instructed to try to estimate as closely as possible the one second duration. On Increase and Decrease runs, participants performed the same task, but were instructed to "try to increase [decrease] their brain's response every time they received negative feedback". Results indicated that participants showed changes in dACC/mFC response under these differing instructional conditions: dACC/mFC activity following negative feedback was higher in the Increase condition, and dACC activity trended lower in the Decrease condition, compared to the Watch condition. Moreover, dACC activity correlated with post-feedback performance adjustments, and these adjustments were highest in the Increase condition. Potential implications for neuromodulation and facilitated learning are discussed.

Show MeSH