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Standardising and assessing digital images for use in clinical trials: a practical, reproducible method that blinds the assessor to treatment allocation.

Bowen AC, Burns K, Tong SY, Andrews RM, Liddle R, O'Meara IM, Westphal DW, Carapetis JR - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: With the increasing availability of high quality digital cameras that are easily operated by the non-professional photographer, the utility of using digital images to assess endpoints in clinical research of skin lesions has growing acceptance.However, rigorous protocols and description of experiences for digital image collection and assessment are not readily available, particularly for research conducted in remote settings.We describe the development and evaluation of a protocol for digital image collection by the non-professional photographer in a remote setting research trial, together with a novel methodology for assessment of clinical outcomes by an expert panel blinded to treatment allocation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, NT, Australia; Telethon Kids Institute for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia; Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA, Australia.

ABSTRACT
With the increasing availability of high quality digital cameras that are easily operated by the non-professional photographer, the utility of using digital images to assess endpoints in clinical research of skin lesions has growing acceptance. However, rigorous protocols and description of experiences for digital image collection and assessment are not readily available, particularly for research conducted in remote settings. We describe the development and evaluation of a protocol for digital image collection by the non-professional photographer in a remote setting research trial, together with a novel methodology for assessment of clinical outcomes by an expert panel blinded to treatment allocation.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The camera settings and icons as used in the protocol (these icons and settings are standard across other popular camera models).In addition the rationale is provided on why these settings were adopted.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222834&req=5

pone-0110395-g005: The camera settings and icons as used in the protocol (these icons and settings are standard across other popular camera models).In addition the rationale is provided on why these settings were adopted.

Mentions: All images were captured using standardised equipment (table 1, figures 1–4).


Standardising and assessing digital images for use in clinical trials: a practical, reproducible method that blinds the assessor to treatment allocation.

Bowen AC, Burns K, Tong SY, Andrews RM, Liddle R, O'Meara IM, Westphal DW, Carapetis JR - PLoS ONE (2014)

The camera settings and icons as used in the protocol (these icons and settings are standard across other popular camera models).In addition the rationale is provided on why these settings were adopted.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222834&req=5

pone-0110395-g005: The camera settings and icons as used in the protocol (these icons and settings are standard across other popular camera models).In addition the rationale is provided on why these settings were adopted.
Mentions: All images were captured using standardised equipment (table 1, figures 1–4).

Bottom Line: With the increasing availability of high quality digital cameras that are easily operated by the non-professional photographer, the utility of using digital images to assess endpoints in clinical research of skin lesions has growing acceptance.However, rigorous protocols and description of experiences for digital image collection and assessment are not readily available, particularly for research conducted in remote settings.We describe the development and evaluation of a protocol for digital image collection by the non-professional photographer in a remote setting research trial, together with a novel methodology for assessment of clinical outcomes by an expert panel blinded to treatment allocation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, NT, Australia; Telethon Kids Institute for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia; Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA, Australia.

ABSTRACT
With the increasing availability of high quality digital cameras that are easily operated by the non-professional photographer, the utility of using digital images to assess endpoints in clinical research of skin lesions has growing acceptance. However, rigorous protocols and description of experiences for digital image collection and assessment are not readily available, particularly for research conducted in remote settings. We describe the development and evaluation of a protocol for digital image collection by the non-professional photographer in a remote setting research trial, together with a novel methodology for assessment of clinical outcomes by an expert panel blinded to treatment allocation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus