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Improving access to dementia services for people from minority ethnic groups.

Mukadam N, Cooper C, Livingston G - Curr Opin Psychiatry (2013)

Bottom Line: Understanding the barriers to help-seeking should help to identify the targets for interventions to encourage help-seeking in minority ethnic communities.Not enough has been done to address the inequality in service use for dementia in minority ethnic groups compared with the majority population.The time has come for the development of targeted and evidence-based interventions in order to improve access and affect outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mental Health Sciences Unit, University College London, London, UK. n.mukadam@ucl.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Purpose of review: Only a minority of people with dementia receive a formal diagnosis despite a growing body of evidence highlighting the benefits of early diagnosis and intervention. People from minority ethnic groups are even more disadvantaged, as they tend to access dementia services later in the illness. Studies exploring the reasons behind underuse of dementia services by minority ethnic groups have highlighted the barriers to help-seeking that seem specific to the cultural groups studied. Understanding the barriers to help-seeking should help to identify the targets for interventions to encourage help-seeking in minority ethnic communities. This review sought to highlight the progress in this field and show what interventions have been developed so far.

Recent findings: Many countries are carrying out educational campaigns in an effort to increase awareness about dementia and reduce stigma, but none of these have reported any measurable outcomes of their interventions. Studies show that knowledge about dementia has the potential to increase help-seeking, but information should be targeted to the recipient audience.

Summary: Not enough has been done to address the inequality in service use for dementia in minority ethnic groups compared with the majority population. The time has come for the development of targeted and evidence-based interventions in order to improve access and affect outcomes.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

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Improving access to dementia services for people from minority ethnic groups.

Mukadam N, Cooper C, Livingston G - Curr Opin Psychiatry (2013)

no caption available
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222802&req=5

FB1: no caption available
Bottom Line: Understanding the barriers to help-seeking should help to identify the targets for interventions to encourage help-seeking in minority ethnic communities.Not enough has been done to address the inequality in service use for dementia in minority ethnic groups compared with the majority population.The time has come for the development of targeted and evidence-based interventions in order to improve access and affect outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mental Health Sciences Unit, University College London, London, UK. n.mukadam@ucl.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Purpose of review: Only a minority of people with dementia receive a formal diagnosis despite a growing body of evidence highlighting the benefits of early diagnosis and intervention. People from minority ethnic groups are even more disadvantaged, as they tend to access dementia services later in the illness. Studies exploring the reasons behind underuse of dementia services by minority ethnic groups have highlighted the barriers to help-seeking that seem specific to the cultural groups studied. Understanding the barriers to help-seeking should help to identify the targets for interventions to encourage help-seeking in minority ethnic communities. This review sought to highlight the progress in this field and show what interventions have been developed so far.

Recent findings: Many countries are carrying out educational campaigns in an effort to increase awareness about dementia and reduce stigma, but none of these have reported any measurable outcomes of their interventions. Studies show that knowledge about dementia has the potential to increase help-seeking, but information should be targeted to the recipient audience.

Summary: Not enough has been done to address the inequality in service use for dementia in minority ethnic groups compared with the majority population. The time has come for the development of targeted and evidence-based interventions in order to improve access and affect outcomes.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus