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National trends in advanced outpatient diagnostic imaging utilization: an analysis of the medical expenditure panel survey, 2000-2009.

Lang K, Huang H, Lee DW, Federico V, Menzin J - BMC Med Imaging (2013)

Bottom Line: This study evaluated trends in national outpatient MRI/CT utilization rates during 2000-2009 and factors associated with utilization.Age, female gender, White race, HMO participation, and all payer types (vs. uninsured) were significant predictors of imaging use.Compared to 2005, years 2000-2003 were associated with a significantly lower likelihood of imaging use, while years 2004-2009 were not significantly associated, suggesting a slow-down in later years.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Boston Health Economics, Inc,, 20 Fox Road, Waltham, MA 02451, USA. jmenzin@bhei.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Concerns have been raised regarding growth in advanced diagnostic imaging use. This study evaluated trends in national outpatient MRI/CT utilization rates during 2000-2009 and factors associated with utilization.

Methods: This retrospective database analysis used data on all respondents in the nationally representative U.S. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) during 2000-2009. Visits involving advanced diagnostic imaging were identified based on self-reported use of MRI or CT tests at emergency departments, office-based medical providers, and outpatient departments. The imaging utilization rate was defined as the number of outpatient visits with MRI/CT per 1,000 person-years. Results were weighted to create nationally representative estimates at the person-year level for each year and the pooled 10-year period. A multivariate logistic regression was estimated to identify predictors of imaging use.

Results: A total of 319,246 person-years were included in the analysis. MRI/CT utilization rates increased from 64.3 to 109.1 per 1,000 person years from 2000 to 2009, with older persons, females and Medicare enrollees having higher rates of use. Growth in imaging slowed in recent years; the average annual decline in the imaging growth rate was larger than that for all outpatient services (4.7% vs. 0.9%). The percentage of respondents with MRI/CT use (6.7% during 2000-2009) also increased at a slower rate in later years and declined during 2007-2009. The average number of MRI/CT visits among imaging users was steady at about 1.5 visits during 2000-2009. Age, female gender, White race, HMO participation, and all payer types (vs. uninsured) were significant predictors of imaging use. Compared to 2005, years 2000-2003 were associated with a significantly lower likelihood of imaging use, while years 2004-2009 were not significantly associated, suggesting a slow-down in later years.

Conclusions: Growth in advanced imaging utilization appears to have slowed in recent years, a finding of potential interest to policy-makers and payers.

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Imaging utilization rate, by year and managed care participation.
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Figure 2: Imaging utilization rate, by year and managed care participation.

Mentions: Older people tended to have higher rates of imaging use, with average MRI/CT utilization rates of approximately 24, 72, 159, and 240 per 1,000 persons for ages <18, 18-44, 45-54 and 65+ years, respectively. Females had higher rates of imaging use than males (115 vs. 90 per 1,000 persons during 2000-2009). The uninsured and those with only Medicaid coverage had similar rates of imaging use that were the lowest rates observed over 2000-2009 across all payer types (52 per 1,000 persons for the uninsured and 63 per 1,000 persons for those with Medicaid only). In contrast, those with any Medicare coverage had the highest rates of utilization (ranging from 227 to 258 per 1,000 persons for these payer groups over the 10-year period). In the earlier years (2000-2005), imaging utilization among those with non-managed care insurance was consistently higher than among those with a managed care plan. However, in the most recent years (2006-2009), the utilization rates by managed care participation appeared to converge (FigureĀ 2).


National trends in advanced outpatient diagnostic imaging utilization: an analysis of the medical expenditure panel survey, 2000-2009.

Lang K, Huang H, Lee DW, Federico V, Menzin J - BMC Med Imaging (2013)

Imaging utilization rate, by year and managed care participation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222739&req=5

Figure 2: Imaging utilization rate, by year and managed care participation.
Mentions: Older people tended to have higher rates of imaging use, with average MRI/CT utilization rates of approximately 24, 72, 159, and 240 per 1,000 persons for ages <18, 18-44, 45-54 and 65+ years, respectively. Females had higher rates of imaging use than males (115 vs. 90 per 1,000 persons during 2000-2009). The uninsured and those with only Medicaid coverage had similar rates of imaging use that were the lowest rates observed over 2000-2009 across all payer types (52 per 1,000 persons for the uninsured and 63 per 1,000 persons for those with Medicaid only). In contrast, those with any Medicare coverage had the highest rates of utilization (ranging from 227 to 258 per 1,000 persons for these payer groups over the 10-year period). In the earlier years (2000-2005), imaging utilization among those with non-managed care insurance was consistently higher than among those with a managed care plan. However, in the most recent years (2006-2009), the utilization rates by managed care participation appeared to converge (FigureĀ 2).

Bottom Line: This study evaluated trends in national outpatient MRI/CT utilization rates during 2000-2009 and factors associated with utilization.Age, female gender, White race, HMO participation, and all payer types (vs. uninsured) were significant predictors of imaging use.Compared to 2005, years 2000-2003 were associated with a significantly lower likelihood of imaging use, while years 2004-2009 were not significantly associated, suggesting a slow-down in later years.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Boston Health Economics, Inc,, 20 Fox Road, Waltham, MA 02451, USA. jmenzin@bhei.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Concerns have been raised regarding growth in advanced diagnostic imaging use. This study evaluated trends in national outpatient MRI/CT utilization rates during 2000-2009 and factors associated with utilization.

Methods: This retrospective database analysis used data on all respondents in the nationally representative U.S. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) during 2000-2009. Visits involving advanced diagnostic imaging were identified based on self-reported use of MRI or CT tests at emergency departments, office-based medical providers, and outpatient departments. The imaging utilization rate was defined as the number of outpatient visits with MRI/CT per 1,000 person-years. Results were weighted to create nationally representative estimates at the person-year level for each year and the pooled 10-year period. A multivariate logistic regression was estimated to identify predictors of imaging use.

Results: A total of 319,246 person-years were included in the analysis. MRI/CT utilization rates increased from 64.3 to 109.1 per 1,000 person years from 2000 to 2009, with older persons, females and Medicare enrollees having higher rates of use. Growth in imaging slowed in recent years; the average annual decline in the imaging growth rate was larger than that for all outpatient services (4.7% vs. 0.9%). The percentage of respondents with MRI/CT use (6.7% during 2000-2009) also increased at a slower rate in later years and declined during 2007-2009. The average number of MRI/CT visits among imaging users was steady at about 1.5 visits during 2000-2009. Age, female gender, White race, HMO participation, and all payer types (vs. uninsured) were significant predictors of imaging use. Compared to 2005, years 2000-2003 were associated with a significantly lower likelihood of imaging use, while years 2004-2009 were not significantly associated, suggesting a slow-down in later years.

Conclusions: Growth in advanced imaging utilization appears to have slowed in recent years, a finding of potential interest to policy-makers and payers.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus