Limits...
Brain mechanisms of social comparison and their influence on the reward system.

Kedia G, Mussweiler T, Linden DE - Neuroreport (2014)

Bottom Line: We discuss recent findings on the consequences of social comparison on the brain processing of outcomes and highlight the role of the brain's reward system.Moreover, we analyze the relationship between the brain networks involved in social comparisons and those active during other forms of cognitive and perceptual comparison.Finally, we discuss potential future questions that research on the neural correlates of social comparison could address.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: aDepartment of Psychology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany bSchool of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK cDepartment of Psychology, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.

ABSTRACT
Whenever we interact with others, we judge them and whenever we make such judgments, we compare them with ourselves, other people, or internalized standards. Countless social psychological experiments have shown that comparative thinking plays a ubiquitous role in person perception and social cognition as a whole. The topic of social comparison has recently aroused the interest of social neuroscientists, who have begun to investigate its neural underpinnings. The present article provides an overview of these neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies. We discuss recent findings on the consequences of social comparison on the brain processing of outcomes and highlight the role of the brain's reward system. Moreover, we analyze the relationship between the brain networks involved in social comparisons and those active during other forms of cognitive and perceptual comparison. Finally, we discuss potential future questions that research on the neural correlates of social comparison could address.

Show MeSH
The feedback-related negativity peaks around 300 ms after negative feedback. Reprinted from Walsh and Anderson 37 with permission from Elsevier and Springer. Adaptations are themselves works protected by copyright. So in order to publish this adaptation, authorization must be obtained both from the owner of the copyright in the original work and from the owner of copyright in the translation or adaptation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222713&req=5

Figure 2: The feedback-related negativity peaks around 300 ms after negative feedback. Reprinted from Walsh and Anderson 37 with permission from Elsevier and Springer. Adaptations are themselves works protected by copyright. So in order to publish this adaptation, authorization must be obtained both from the owner of the copyright in the original work and from the owner of copyright in the translation or adaptation.

Mentions: The error signal produced by the dACC can be measured as a negative event-related potential on the scalp. This feedback-related negativity (FRN) peaks around 300 ms and is maximal at frontocentral scalp electrode sites 36 (Fig. 2). The FRN is observed following losses or error feedback compared with wins or positive feedback, and can also be induced by positive prediction errors such as that produced by unexpected omissions of pain 38. Several event-related potential (ERP) experiments tested whether the FRN is modulated by social comparison.


Brain mechanisms of social comparison and their influence on the reward system.

Kedia G, Mussweiler T, Linden DE - Neuroreport (2014)

The feedback-related negativity peaks around 300 ms after negative feedback. Reprinted from Walsh and Anderson 37 with permission from Elsevier and Springer. Adaptations are themselves works protected by copyright. So in order to publish this adaptation, authorization must be obtained both from the owner of the copyright in the original work and from the owner of copyright in the translation or adaptation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222713&req=5

Figure 2: The feedback-related negativity peaks around 300 ms after negative feedback. Reprinted from Walsh and Anderson 37 with permission from Elsevier and Springer. Adaptations are themselves works protected by copyright. So in order to publish this adaptation, authorization must be obtained both from the owner of the copyright in the original work and from the owner of copyright in the translation or adaptation.
Mentions: The error signal produced by the dACC can be measured as a negative event-related potential on the scalp. This feedback-related negativity (FRN) peaks around 300 ms and is maximal at frontocentral scalp electrode sites 36 (Fig. 2). The FRN is observed following losses or error feedback compared with wins or positive feedback, and can also be induced by positive prediction errors such as that produced by unexpected omissions of pain 38. Several event-related potential (ERP) experiments tested whether the FRN is modulated by social comparison.

Bottom Line: We discuss recent findings on the consequences of social comparison on the brain processing of outcomes and highlight the role of the brain's reward system.Moreover, we analyze the relationship between the brain networks involved in social comparisons and those active during other forms of cognitive and perceptual comparison.Finally, we discuss potential future questions that research on the neural correlates of social comparison could address.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: aDepartment of Psychology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany bSchool of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK cDepartment of Psychology, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.

ABSTRACT
Whenever we interact with others, we judge them and whenever we make such judgments, we compare them with ourselves, other people, or internalized standards. Countless social psychological experiments have shown that comparative thinking plays a ubiquitous role in person perception and social cognition as a whole. The topic of social comparison has recently aroused the interest of social neuroscientists, who have begun to investigate its neural underpinnings. The present article provides an overview of these neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies. We discuss recent findings on the consequences of social comparison on the brain processing of outcomes and highlight the role of the brain's reward system. Moreover, we analyze the relationship between the brain networks involved in social comparisons and those active during other forms of cognitive and perceptual comparison. Finally, we discuss potential future questions that research on the neural correlates of social comparison could address.

Show MeSH