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Children, parents and pets exercising together (CPET): exploratory randomised controlled trial.

Morrison R, Reilly JJ, Penpraze V, Westgarth C, Ward DS, Mutrie N, Hutchison P, Young D, McNicol L, Calvert M, Yam PS - BMC Public Health (2013)

Bottom Line: Intervention and control groups were compared using analysis of covariance.This was not statistically significant.The acceptability of the CPET intervention and outcome measures was high.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. r.morrison.2@research.gla.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Levels of physical activity (PA) in UK children are much lower than recommended and novel approaches to its promotion are needed. The Children, Parents and Pets Exercising Together (CPET) study is the first exploratory randomised controlled trial (RCT) to develop and evaluate an intervention aimed at dog-based PA promotion in families. CPET aimed to assess the feasibility, acceptability and potential efficacy of a theory-driven, family-based, dog walking intervention for 9-11 year olds.

Methods: Twenty-eight families were allocated randomly to either receive a 10-week dog based PA intervention or to a control group. Families in the intervention group were motivated and supported to increase the frequency, intensity and duration of dog walking using a number of behaviour change techniques. Parents in the intervention group were asked to complete a short study exit questionnaire. In addition, focus groups with parents and children in the intervention group, and with key stakeholders were undertaken. The primary outcome measure was 10 week change in total volume of PA using the mean accelerometer count per minute (cpm). Intervention and control groups were compared using analysis of covariance. Analysis was performed on an intention to treat basis.

Results: Twenty five families were retained at follow up (89%) and 97% of all outcome data were collected at baseline and follow up. Thirteen of 14 (93%) intervention group parents available at follow up completed the study exit questionnaire and noted that study outcome measures were acceptable. There was a mean difference in child total volume of PA of 27 cpm (95% CI -70, 123) and -3 cpm (95% CI -60, 54) for intervention and control group children, respectively. This was not statistically significant. Approximately 21% of dog walking time for parents and 39% of dog walking time for children was moderate-vigorous PA.

Conclusions: The acceptability of the CPET intervention and outcome measures was high. Using pet dogs as the agent of lifestyle change in PA interventions in children and their parents is both feasible and acceptable, but did not result in a significant increase in child PA in this exploratory trial.

Trial registration: ISRCTN85939423.

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Flow of the study participants.
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Figure 1: Flow of the study participants.

Mentions: Invitation letters were sent to approximately 350 dog-owning parents with children attending mainstream primary schools in one local authority area, East Dunbartonshire, in the West of Scotland. Families that responded to the letter were included only if they met the inclusion criteria [16]. Parents were asked to complete a dog behaviour screening questionnaire developed by two members of the Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors (Westgarth and Hutchison) which assessed whether it was appropriate for each dog to take part in the study. Dogs that did not pass the screening questionnaire and those which were physically unable to take part were excluded. Finally, a CONSORT study flow diagram [29] (FigureĀ 1) was used to summarise sample attrition and missing data for all of the outcome measures. Data on exclusion, recruitment, retention, number of missed intervention sessions and number of completed outcome measures are provided as an indicator of trial feasibility. The Carstairs Score [30] was used as a proxy for socio-economic status of study participants. The Carstairs score is a deprivation measure deriving from UK census data and each postcode area is classified into a deprivation category (DEPCAT for short) ranging from 1 (most affluent) to 7 (most deprived).


Children, parents and pets exercising together (CPET): exploratory randomised controlled trial.

Morrison R, Reilly JJ, Penpraze V, Westgarth C, Ward DS, Mutrie N, Hutchison P, Young D, McNicol L, Calvert M, Yam PS - BMC Public Health (2013)

Flow of the study participants.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222564&req=5

Figure 1: Flow of the study participants.
Mentions: Invitation letters were sent to approximately 350 dog-owning parents with children attending mainstream primary schools in one local authority area, East Dunbartonshire, in the West of Scotland. Families that responded to the letter were included only if they met the inclusion criteria [16]. Parents were asked to complete a dog behaviour screening questionnaire developed by two members of the Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors (Westgarth and Hutchison) which assessed whether it was appropriate for each dog to take part in the study. Dogs that did not pass the screening questionnaire and those which were physically unable to take part were excluded. Finally, a CONSORT study flow diagram [29] (FigureĀ 1) was used to summarise sample attrition and missing data for all of the outcome measures. Data on exclusion, recruitment, retention, number of missed intervention sessions and number of completed outcome measures are provided as an indicator of trial feasibility. The Carstairs Score [30] was used as a proxy for socio-economic status of study participants. The Carstairs score is a deprivation measure deriving from UK census data and each postcode area is classified into a deprivation category (DEPCAT for short) ranging from 1 (most affluent) to 7 (most deprived).

Bottom Line: Intervention and control groups were compared using analysis of covariance.This was not statistically significant.The acceptability of the CPET intervention and outcome measures was high.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. r.morrison.2@research.gla.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Levels of physical activity (PA) in UK children are much lower than recommended and novel approaches to its promotion are needed. The Children, Parents and Pets Exercising Together (CPET) study is the first exploratory randomised controlled trial (RCT) to develop and evaluate an intervention aimed at dog-based PA promotion in families. CPET aimed to assess the feasibility, acceptability and potential efficacy of a theory-driven, family-based, dog walking intervention for 9-11 year olds.

Methods: Twenty-eight families were allocated randomly to either receive a 10-week dog based PA intervention or to a control group. Families in the intervention group were motivated and supported to increase the frequency, intensity and duration of dog walking using a number of behaviour change techniques. Parents in the intervention group were asked to complete a short study exit questionnaire. In addition, focus groups with parents and children in the intervention group, and with key stakeholders were undertaken. The primary outcome measure was 10 week change in total volume of PA using the mean accelerometer count per minute (cpm). Intervention and control groups were compared using analysis of covariance. Analysis was performed on an intention to treat basis.

Results: Twenty five families were retained at follow up (89%) and 97% of all outcome data were collected at baseline and follow up. Thirteen of 14 (93%) intervention group parents available at follow up completed the study exit questionnaire and noted that study outcome measures were acceptable. There was a mean difference in child total volume of PA of 27 cpm (95% CI -70, 123) and -3 cpm (95% CI -60, 54) for intervention and control group children, respectively. This was not statistically significant. Approximately 21% of dog walking time for parents and 39% of dog walking time for children was moderate-vigorous PA.

Conclusions: The acceptability of the CPET intervention and outcome measures was high. Using pet dogs as the agent of lifestyle change in PA interventions in children and their parents is both feasible and acceptable, but did not result in a significant increase in child PA in this exploratory trial.

Trial registration: ISRCTN85939423.

Show MeSH