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Extracellular vesicles in hematological disorders.

Aharon A, Rebibo-Sabbah A, Tzoran I, Levin C - Rambam Maimonides Med J (2014)

Bottom Line: Extracellular vesicles (EVs), comprised of exosomes, microparticles, apoptotic bodies, and other microvesicles, are shed from a variety of cells upon cell activation or apoptosis.EVs promote clot formation, mediate pro-inflammatory processes, transfer proteins and miRNA to cells, and induce cell signaling that regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis.This paper will review the contribution of EVs in hematological disorders, including hemoglobinopathies (sickle cell disease, thalassemia), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hematological malignancies (lymphomas, myelomas, and acute and chronic leukemias).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Microvesicles Research Laboratory, Thrombosis and Hemostasis Unit, Department of Hematology, Rambam Health Care Campus; ; Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel;

ABSTRACT
Extracellular vesicles (EVs), comprised of exosomes, microparticles, apoptotic bodies, and other microvesicles, are shed from a variety of cells upon cell activation or apoptosis. EVs promote clot formation, mediate pro-inflammatory processes, transfer proteins and miRNA to cells, and induce cell signaling that regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis. This paper will review the contribution of EVs in hematological disorders, including hemoglobinopathies (sickle cell disease, thalassemia), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hematological malignancies (lymphomas, myelomas, and acute and chronic leukemias).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Involvement of Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) in Hematologic Disorders.Inherited and acquired defects as well as exposure to chemotherapy, radiation, and cytokines result in release of EVs from a variety of cells (e.g. hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, blood, vascular, and tumor cells) to the bone marrow microenvironment, the vascular compartment, and the target organ with auto- and paracrine effects. Extracellular vesicles, which include microparticles and exosomes, express adhesion molecules, cytokines, growth versus apoptotic factors, coagulation factors and miRNA. In hematologic malignancies, EVs promote metastasis, angiogenesis, and thrombogenicity. In thalassemia/sickle cell diseases, EVs promote cell injury, apoptosis, and thrombogenicity.
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f1-rmmj-5-4-e0032: Involvement of Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) in Hematologic Disorders.Inherited and acquired defects as well as exposure to chemotherapy, radiation, and cytokines result in release of EVs from a variety of cells (e.g. hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, blood, vascular, and tumor cells) to the bone marrow microenvironment, the vascular compartment, and the target organ with auto- and paracrine effects. Extracellular vesicles, which include microparticles and exosomes, express adhesion molecules, cytokines, growth versus apoptotic factors, coagulation factors and miRNA. In hematologic malignancies, EVs promote metastasis, angiogenesis, and thrombogenicity. In thalassemia/sickle cell diseases, EVs promote cell injury, apoptosis, and thrombogenicity.

Mentions: There are millions of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in the circulation of healthy persons, and their level may increase in a variety of pathologies. EVs may be divided into sub-groups, i.e. exosomes, micro-particles, and apoptotic bodies, which are shed from both normal and malignant cells upon cell activation or apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles promote clot formation, mediate pro-inflammatory processes, facilitate cell-to-cell interactions, transfer proteins and miRNA to cells, and induce cell signaling (Figure 1). This paper will review earlier studies which focus on the role of EVs in hematological disorders, including hemoglobinopathies (sickle cell disease, thalassemia), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hematological malignancies (lymphomas, myelomas, acute and chronic leukemias). In addition, it will review the involvement of EVs in the hypercoagulability characterizing these hematological disorders.


Extracellular vesicles in hematological disorders.

Aharon A, Rebibo-Sabbah A, Tzoran I, Levin C - Rambam Maimonides Med J (2014)

Involvement of Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) in Hematologic Disorders.Inherited and acquired defects as well as exposure to chemotherapy, radiation, and cytokines result in release of EVs from a variety of cells (e.g. hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, blood, vascular, and tumor cells) to the bone marrow microenvironment, the vascular compartment, and the target organ with auto- and paracrine effects. Extracellular vesicles, which include microparticles and exosomes, express adhesion molecules, cytokines, growth versus apoptotic factors, coagulation factors and miRNA. In hematologic malignancies, EVs promote metastasis, angiogenesis, and thrombogenicity. In thalassemia/sickle cell diseases, EVs promote cell injury, apoptosis, and thrombogenicity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222421&req=5

f1-rmmj-5-4-e0032: Involvement of Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) in Hematologic Disorders.Inherited and acquired defects as well as exposure to chemotherapy, radiation, and cytokines result in release of EVs from a variety of cells (e.g. hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, blood, vascular, and tumor cells) to the bone marrow microenvironment, the vascular compartment, and the target organ with auto- and paracrine effects. Extracellular vesicles, which include microparticles and exosomes, express adhesion molecules, cytokines, growth versus apoptotic factors, coagulation factors and miRNA. In hematologic malignancies, EVs promote metastasis, angiogenesis, and thrombogenicity. In thalassemia/sickle cell diseases, EVs promote cell injury, apoptosis, and thrombogenicity.
Mentions: There are millions of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in the circulation of healthy persons, and their level may increase in a variety of pathologies. EVs may be divided into sub-groups, i.e. exosomes, micro-particles, and apoptotic bodies, which are shed from both normal and malignant cells upon cell activation or apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles promote clot formation, mediate pro-inflammatory processes, facilitate cell-to-cell interactions, transfer proteins and miRNA to cells, and induce cell signaling (Figure 1). This paper will review earlier studies which focus on the role of EVs in hematological disorders, including hemoglobinopathies (sickle cell disease, thalassemia), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hematological malignancies (lymphomas, myelomas, acute and chronic leukemias). In addition, it will review the involvement of EVs in the hypercoagulability characterizing these hematological disorders.

Bottom Line: Extracellular vesicles (EVs), comprised of exosomes, microparticles, apoptotic bodies, and other microvesicles, are shed from a variety of cells upon cell activation or apoptosis.EVs promote clot formation, mediate pro-inflammatory processes, transfer proteins and miRNA to cells, and induce cell signaling that regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis.This paper will review the contribution of EVs in hematological disorders, including hemoglobinopathies (sickle cell disease, thalassemia), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hematological malignancies (lymphomas, myelomas, and acute and chronic leukemias).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Microvesicles Research Laboratory, Thrombosis and Hemostasis Unit, Department of Hematology, Rambam Health Care Campus; ; Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel;

ABSTRACT
Extracellular vesicles (EVs), comprised of exosomes, microparticles, apoptotic bodies, and other microvesicles, are shed from a variety of cells upon cell activation or apoptosis. EVs promote clot formation, mediate pro-inflammatory processes, transfer proteins and miRNA to cells, and induce cell signaling that regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis. This paper will review the contribution of EVs in hematological disorders, including hemoglobinopathies (sickle cell disease, thalassemia), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hematological malignancies (lymphomas, myelomas, and acute and chronic leukemias).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus