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The complete mitochondrial genomes of the Fenton's wood white, Leptidea morsei, and the lemon emigrant, Catopsilia pomona.

Hao JJ, Hao JS, Sun XY, Zhang LL, Yang Q - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: In addition, there was a triplicated 23 bp repeat and a microsatellite-like (TA)9(AT)3 element in the A+T-rich region of the L. morsei mitogenome, while in C. pomona, there was a duplicated 24 bp repeat element and a microsatellite-like (TA)9 element.The phylogenetic trees of the main butterfly lineages (Hesperiidae, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Nymphalidae, Lycaenidae, and Riodinidae) were reconstructed with maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods based on the 13 concatenated nucleotide sequences of protein-coding genes, and both trees showed that the Pieridae family is sister to Lycaenidae.Although this result contradicts the traditional morphologically based views, it agrees with other recent studies based on mitochondrial genomic data.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Life Sciences, Anhui Normal University, 241000 Wuhu, China haojuan523@126.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic trees of the butterflies in this study based on the nucleotide sequences of 13 protein-coding genes. (A) Maximum likelihood tree. (B) Bayesian inference tree. Numbers at each node indicate bootstrap percentage of maximum likelihood analysis and posterior probability of Bayesian inference analysis. High quality figures are available online.
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f04_01: Phylogenetic trees of the butterflies in this study based on the nucleotide sequences of 13 protein-coding genes. (A) Maximum likelihood tree. (B) Bayesian inference tree. Numbers at each node indicate bootstrap percentage of maximum likelihood analysis and posterior probability of Bayesian inference analysis. High quality figures are available online.

Mentions: In this study, we conducted phylogenetic analyses via Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood methods, using concatenated nucleotide datasets of 13 protein-coding genes (6,582 aligned sites, 910 gaps, and 3,746 excluded positions), resulting in similar tree topologies of the butterfly families Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae, and Nymphalidae (Fig. 4 A and B). The presented trees showed two major clusters (Fig. 4 A and B). The first one had the Papilionidae as the basal lineage, and the other one included the rest of the butterfly families. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference trees suggest a close relationship between Pieridae and Lycaenidae (Fig. 4 A and B), in agreement with the prevailing phylogeny of butterfly families (Hesperiidae (Papilionidae (Nymphalidae (Pieridae, Lycaenidae)))). Although the close relationship of the Pieridae and Lycaenidae proposed herein is contradictory to the traditional view (Pieridae (Nymphalidae, Lycaenidae)), the result is consistent with those of recent studies (Kim, M. J. et al. 2010, Chai et al. 2012, Hao et al. 2012, Zhang et al. 2012). However, uncertainty does exist regarding the sister relationship of the Pieridae and Lycaenidae as shown in the maximum likelihood tree (Fig. 4A). We also note that this relationship has been derived mainly from the protein-coding genes of the mitochondrial genome of butterflies.


The complete mitochondrial genomes of the Fenton's wood white, Leptidea morsei, and the lemon emigrant, Catopsilia pomona.

Hao JJ, Hao JS, Sun XY, Zhang LL, Yang Q - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

Phylogenetic trees of the butterflies in this study based on the nucleotide sequences of 13 protein-coding genes. (A) Maximum likelihood tree. (B) Bayesian inference tree. Numbers at each node indicate bootstrap percentage of maximum likelihood analysis and posterior probability of Bayesian inference analysis. High quality figures are available online.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222323&req=5

f04_01: Phylogenetic trees of the butterflies in this study based on the nucleotide sequences of 13 protein-coding genes. (A) Maximum likelihood tree. (B) Bayesian inference tree. Numbers at each node indicate bootstrap percentage of maximum likelihood analysis and posterior probability of Bayesian inference analysis. High quality figures are available online.
Mentions: In this study, we conducted phylogenetic analyses via Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood methods, using concatenated nucleotide datasets of 13 protein-coding genes (6,582 aligned sites, 910 gaps, and 3,746 excluded positions), resulting in similar tree topologies of the butterfly families Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae, and Nymphalidae (Fig. 4 A and B). The presented trees showed two major clusters (Fig. 4 A and B). The first one had the Papilionidae as the basal lineage, and the other one included the rest of the butterfly families. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference trees suggest a close relationship between Pieridae and Lycaenidae (Fig. 4 A and B), in agreement with the prevailing phylogeny of butterfly families (Hesperiidae (Papilionidae (Nymphalidae (Pieridae, Lycaenidae)))). Although the close relationship of the Pieridae and Lycaenidae proposed herein is contradictory to the traditional view (Pieridae (Nymphalidae, Lycaenidae)), the result is consistent with those of recent studies (Kim, M. J. et al. 2010, Chai et al. 2012, Hao et al. 2012, Zhang et al. 2012). However, uncertainty does exist regarding the sister relationship of the Pieridae and Lycaenidae as shown in the maximum likelihood tree (Fig. 4A). We also note that this relationship has been derived mainly from the protein-coding genes of the mitochondrial genome of butterflies.

Bottom Line: In addition, there was a triplicated 23 bp repeat and a microsatellite-like (TA)9(AT)3 element in the A+T-rich region of the L. morsei mitogenome, while in C. pomona, there was a duplicated 24 bp repeat element and a microsatellite-like (TA)9 element.The phylogenetic trees of the main butterfly lineages (Hesperiidae, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Nymphalidae, Lycaenidae, and Riodinidae) were reconstructed with maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods based on the 13 concatenated nucleotide sequences of protein-coding genes, and both trees showed that the Pieridae family is sister to Lycaenidae.Although this result contradicts the traditional morphologically based views, it agrees with other recent studies based on mitochondrial genomic data.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Life Sciences, Anhui Normal University, 241000 Wuhu, China haojuan523@126.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus