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Effects of rearing host species on the host-feeding capacity and parasitism of the whitefly parasitoid Encarsia formosa.

Dai P, Ruan C, Zang L, Wan F, Liu L - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Regardless of the species on which it was reared, E. formosa fed significantly more on the B. tabaci nymphs than on the T. vaporariorum nymphs.In addition, the wasps reared on T. vaporariorum parasitized significantly more on T. vaporariorum than those reared on B. tabaci.Additionally, a similar number of B. tabaci nymphs were killed by parasitism and host feeding regardless of the rearing host species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Engineering Research Center of Natural Enemy Insects, Institute of Biological Control, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun, Jilin 130118, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A clear plastic cell containing whitefly nymphs on a water-cultured tomato leaf used for the evaluation of host feeding and parasitism by whitefly parasitoids, Encarsia formosa.
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f01_01: A clear plastic cell containing whitefly nymphs on a water-cultured tomato leaf used for the evaluation of host feeding and parasitism by whitefly parasitoids, Encarsia formosa.

Mentions: The following procedures were used to obtain the desired stage of the hosts. Thirty unsexed adults of B. tabaci or 40 adults of T. vaporariorum were introduced onto the lower surface of the leaf of a potted tomato plant in a clip cage (4.0 cm diam) for oviposition for 12 h. The nymphs were then monitored daily until they developed into third instars. Forty nymphs of the desired stage were used on each leaf, and extra whitefly nymphs were removed under a binocular stereoscopic microscope using an insect pin. The petiole end of the detached tomato leaf with whitefly nymphs was wrapped with cotton, inserted into a 60-mL cup full of water, and then placed in a clear plastic cup (10 cm diam, 15 cm deep) with a ventilation hole (4 × 4 cm) and covered with a 100-mesh polyethylene screen. This clear plastic cell was used to evaluate the host feeding and parasitism by E. formosa on the whitefly nymphs (Fig. 1). After a 48-h exposure time, the survival of the introduced wasps in each treatment was determined, and they were subsequently removed.


Effects of rearing host species on the host-feeding capacity and parasitism of the whitefly parasitoid Encarsia formosa.

Dai P, Ruan C, Zang L, Wan F, Liu L - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

A clear plastic cell containing whitefly nymphs on a water-cultured tomato leaf used for the evaluation of host feeding and parasitism by whitefly parasitoids, Encarsia formosa.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222317&req=5

f01_01: A clear plastic cell containing whitefly nymphs on a water-cultured tomato leaf used for the evaluation of host feeding and parasitism by whitefly parasitoids, Encarsia formosa.
Mentions: The following procedures were used to obtain the desired stage of the hosts. Thirty unsexed adults of B. tabaci or 40 adults of T. vaporariorum were introduced onto the lower surface of the leaf of a potted tomato plant in a clip cage (4.0 cm diam) for oviposition for 12 h. The nymphs were then monitored daily until they developed into third instars. Forty nymphs of the desired stage were used on each leaf, and extra whitefly nymphs were removed under a binocular stereoscopic microscope using an insect pin. The petiole end of the detached tomato leaf with whitefly nymphs was wrapped with cotton, inserted into a 60-mL cup full of water, and then placed in a clear plastic cup (10 cm diam, 15 cm deep) with a ventilation hole (4 × 4 cm) and covered with a 100-mesh polyethylene screen. This clear plastic cell was used to evaluate the host feeding and parasitism by E. formosa on the whitefly nymphs (Fig. 1). After a 48-h exposure time, the survival of the introduced wasps in each treatment was determined, and they were subsequently removed.

Bottom Line: Regardless of the species on which it was reared, E. formosa fed significantly more on the B. tabaci nymphs than on the T. vaporariorum nymphs.In addition, the wasps reared on T. vaporariorum parasitized significantly more on T. vaporariorum than those reared on B. tabaci.Additionally, a similar number of B. tabaci nymphs were killed by parasitism and host feeding regardless of the rearing host species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Engineering Research Center of Natural Enemy Insects, Institute of Biological Control, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun, Jilin 130118, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus