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Effects of environmental factors and appendage injury on the wing variation in the cricket Velarifictorus ornatus.

Zhao LQ, Zhu DH - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: The percentage of micropters was more than 95% when the nymphs were reared at constant photoperiods, and changing photoperiod did not affect wing variation in V. ornatus at 25 or 30°C.These results indicate that low and high rearing densities induce micropters, but intermediate rearing density stimulates the formation of macropters.Meanwhile, severance of appendages, such as antennae, femora, and tibiae, in the nymph stage exerted a micropterizing effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Insect Behavior & Evolutionary Ecology, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410004, China zhaolvquan80@163.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of middle leg loss on the wing morph of the cricket V. ornatus. Bars labeled with the same letters are not significantly different (P > 0.05), whereas bars labeled with different letters are significantly different (P < 0.05; Kruskal-Wallis test; n = 20–30). High quality figures are available online.
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f04_01: Effect of middle leg loss on the wing morph of the cricket V. ornatus. Bars labeled with the same letters are not significantly different (P > 0.05), whereas bars labeled with different letters are significantly different (P < 0.05; Kruskal-Wallis test; n = 20–30). High quality figures are available online.

Mentions: The middle legs of nymphs were removed at 25, 35, 45, and 60 days after hatching. When the operation was performed at 25 days, the incidence of micropterous adults was similar to that in non-injured individuals (Fig. 4). However, when the operations were performed at 35, 45 or 60 days, the incidence of micropters was significantly higher than that in non-injured individuals; furthermore, the incidence of micropters was significantly higher when the middle legs were removed at 45 and 60 days than when they were removed at 25 days (P < 0.05; Kruskal-Wallis test; Fig. 4). These results indicate that the penultimate and last nymphal instars were most sensitive to injury as indicated by the formation of short-winged individuals.


Effects of environmental factors and appendage injury on the wing variation in the cricket Velarifictorus ornatus.

Zhao LQ, Zhu DH - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

Effect of middle leg loss on the wing morph of the cricket V. ornatus. Bars labeled with the same letters are not significantly different (P > 0.05), whereas bars labeled with different letters are significantly different (P < 0.05; Kruskal-Wallis test; n = 20–30). High quality figures are available online.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222306&req=5

f04_01: Effect of middle leg loss on the wing morph of the cricket V. ornatus. Bars labeled with the same letters are not significantly different (P > 0.05), whereas bars labeled with different letters are significantly different (P < 0.05; Kruskal-Wallis test; n = 20–30). High quality figures are available online.
Mentions: The middle legs of nymphs were removed at 25, 35, 45, and 60 days after hatching. When the operation was performed at 25 days, the incidence of micropterous adults was similar to that in non-injured individuals (Fig. 4). However, when the operations were performed at 35, 45 or 60 days, the incidence of micropters was significantly higher than that in non-injured individuals; furthermore, the incidence of micropters was significantly higher when the middle legs were removed at 45 and 60 days than when they were removed at 25 days (P < 0.05; Kruskal-Wallis test; Fig. 4). These results indicate that the penultimate and last nymphal instars were most sensitive to injury as indicated by the formation of short-winged individuals.

Bottom Line: The percentage of micropters was more than 95% when the nymphs were reared at constant photoperiods, and changing photoperiod did not affect wing variation in V. ornatus at 25 or 30°C.These results indicate that low and high rearing densities induce micropters, but intermediate rearing density stimulates the formation of macropters.Meanwhile, severance of appendages, such as antennae, femora, and tibiae, in the nymph stage exerted a micropterizing effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Insect Behavior & Evolutionary Ecology, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410004, China zhaolvquan80@163.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus