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Repeated predictable stress causes resilience against colitis-induced behavioral changes in mice.

Hassan AM, Jain P, Reichmann F, Mayerhofer R, Farzi A, Schuligoi R, Holzer P - Front Behav Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Repeated WAS significantly decreased the relative expression of corticotropin-releasing factor mRNA in the hippocampus.The effect of repeated WAS to blunt the DSS-evoked behavioral disturbances was associated with a rise of circulating corticosterone and an increase in the expression of hypothalamic NPY mRNA.We conclude that the mechanisms underlying the resilience effect of repeated WAS involves hypothalamic NPY and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Unit of Translational Neurogastroenterology, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Graz Graz, Austria.

ABSTRACT
Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an increased risk of mental disorders and can be exacerbated by stress. In this study which was performed with male 10-week old C57Bl/6N mice, we used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis to evaluate behavioral changes caused by intestinal inflammation, to assess the interaction between repeated psychological stress (water avoidance stress, WAS) and colitis in modifying behavior, and to analyze neurochemical correlates of this interaction. A 7-day treatment with DSS (2% in drinking water) decreased locomotion and enhanced anxiety-like behavior in the open field test and reduced social interaction. Repeated exposure to WAS for 7 days had little influence on behavior but prevented the DSS-induced behavioral disturbances in the open field and SI tests. In contrast, repeated WAS did not modify colon length, colonic myeloperoxidase content and circulating proinflammatory cytokines, parameters used to assess colitis severity. DSS-induced colitis was associated with an increase in circulating neuropeptide Y (NPY), a rise in the hypothalamic expression of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and a decrease in the hippocampal expression of NPY mRNA, brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA. Repeated WAS significantly decreased the relative expression of corticotropin-releasing factor mRNA in the hippocampus. The effect of repeated WAS to blunt the DSS-evoked behavioral disturbances was associated with a rise of circulating corticosterone and an increase in the expression of hypothalamic NPY mRNA. These results show that experimental colitis leads to a particular range of behavioral alterations which can be prevented by repeated WAS, a model of predictable chronic stress, while the severity of colitis remains unabated. We conclude that the mechanisms underlying the resilience effect of repeated WAS involves hypothalamic NPY and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of a 7-day treatment with DSS and WAS, alone and in combination, on behavior in the SI test as carried out 2 days after the end of the treatment period. The left (A) and middle (B) panel explain the procedure of the SI test that consisted of two sessions, the first session being conducted without a target mouse in the cylindrical container. Panel (C) presents the results of the SI test as percentage social interaction, calculated as the percent ratio of the time spent in the interaction zone in the presence of the target mouse divided by the time spent in the interaction zone in the absence of the target mouse. There was a significant interaction between WAS and DSS in modifying social interaction percent (p < 0.05). The data shown are means + s.e.m., n = 16–17 per group; *p < 0.05 vs. control, §§p < 0.01 vs. DSS.
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Figure 4: Effect of a 7-day treatment with DSS and WAS, alone and in combination, on behavior in the SI test as carried out 2 days after the end of the treatment period. The left (A) and middle (B) panel explain the procedure of the SI test that consisted of two sessions, the first session being conducted without a target mouse in the cylindrical container. Panel (C) presents the results of the SI test as percentage social interaction, calculated as the percent ratio of the time spent in the interaction zone in the presence of the target mouse divided by the time spent in the interaction zone in the absence of the target mouse. There was a significant interaction between WAS and DSS in modifying social interaction percent (p < 0.05). The data shown are means + s.e.m., n = 16–17 per group; *p < 0.05 vs. control, §§p < 0.01 vs. DSS.

Mentions: In the SI test it was found that DSS treatment reduced SI and that there was a significant interaction between WAS and DSS [F(1, 61) = 5.2; p = 0.027]. Post-hoc analysis showed that DSS significantly reduced the social activity of mice only in the absence of WAS while, in the presence of WAS, DSS did not affect social activity (Figure 4).


Repeated predictable stress causes resilience against colitis-induced behavioral changes in mice.

Hassan AM, Jain P, Reichmann F, Mayerhofer R, Farzi A, Schuligoi R, Holzer P - Front Behav Neurosci (2014)

Effect of a 7-day treatment with DSS and WAS, alone and in combination, on behavior in the SI test as carried out 2 days after the end of the treatment period. The left (A) and middle (B) panel explain the procedure of the SI test that consisted of two sessions, the first session being conducted without a target mouse in the cylindrical container. Panel (C) presents the results of the SI test as percentage social interaction, calculated as the percent ratio of the time spent in the interaction zone in the presence of the target mouse divided by the time spent in the interaction zone in the absence of the target mouse. There was a significant interaction between WAS and DSS in modifying social interaction percent (p < 0.05). The data shown are means + s.e.m., n = 16–17 per group; *p < 0.05 vs. control, §§p < 0.01 vs. DSS.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222228&req=5

Figure 4: Effect of a 7-day treatment with DSS and WAS, alone and in combination, on behavior in the SI test as carried out 2 days after the end of the treatment period. The left (A) and middle (B) panel explain the procedure of the SI test that consisted of two sessions, the first session being conducted without a target mouse in the cylindrical container. Panel (C) presents the results of the SI test as percentage social interaction, calculated as the percent ratio of the time spent in the interaction zone in the presence of the target mouse divided by the time spent in the interaction zone in the absence of the target mouse. There was a significant interaction between WAS and DSS in modifying social interaction percent (p < 0.05). The data shown are means + s.e.m., n = 16–17 per group; *p < 0.05 vs. control, §§p < 0.01 vs. DSS.
Mentions: In the SI test it was found that DSS treatment reduced SI and that there was a significant interaction between WAS and DSS [F(1, 61) = 5.2; p = 0.027]. Post-hoc analysis showed that DSS significantly reduced the social activity of mice only in the absence of WAS while, in the presence of WAS, DSS did not affect social activity (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: Repeated WAS significantly decreased the relative expression of corticotropin-releasing factor mRNA in the hippocampus.The effect of repeated WAS to blunt the DSS-evoked behavioral disturbances was associated with a rise of circulating corticosterone and an increase in the expression of hypothalamic NPY mRNA.We conclude that the mechanisms underlying the resilience effect of repeated WAS involves hypothalamic NPY and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Unit of Translational Neurogastroenterology, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Graz Graz, Austria.

ABSTRACT
Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an increased risk of mental disorders and can be exacerbated by stress. In this study which was performed with male 10-week old C57Bl/6N mice, we used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis to evaluate behavioral changes caused by intestinal inflammation, to assess the interaction between repeated psychological stress (water avoidance stress, WAS) and colitis in modifying behavior, and to analyze neurochemical correlates of this interaction. A 7-day treatment with DSS (2% in drinking water) decreased locomotion and enhanced anxiety-like behavior in the open field test and reduced social interaction. Repeated exposure to WAS for 7 days had little influence on behavior but prevented the DSS-induced behavioral disturbances in the open field and SI tests. In contrast, repeated WAS did not modify colon length, colonic myeloperoxidase content and circulating proinflammatory cytokines, parameters used to assess colitis severity. DSS-induced colitis was associated with an increase in circulating neuropeptide Y (NPY), a rise in the hypothalamic expression of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and a decrease in the hippocampal expression of NPY mRNA, brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA. Repeated WAS significantly decreased the relative expression of corticotropin-releasing factor mRNA in the hippocampus. The effect of repeated WAS to blunt the DSS-evoked behavioral disturbances was associated with a rise of circulating corticosterone and an increase in the expression of hypothalamic NPY mRNA. These results show that experimental colitis leads to a particular range of behavioral alterations which can be prevented by repeated WAS, a model of predictable chronic stress, while the severity of colitis remains unabated. We conclude that the mechanisms underlying the resilience effect of repeated WAS involves hypothalamic NPY and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus