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The power-proportion method for intracranial volume correction in volumetric imaging analysis.

Liu D, Johnson HJ, Long JD, Magnotta VA, Paulsen JS - Front Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: In volumetric brain imaging analysis, volumes of brain structures are typically assumed to be proportional or linearly related to intracranial volume (ICV).However, evidence abounds that many brain structures have power law relationships with ICV.The performance of the new method is demonstrated using data from the PREDICT-HD study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa Iowa City, IA, USA.

ABSTRACT
In volumetric brain imaging analysis, volumes of brain structures are typically assumed to be proportional or linearly related to intracranial volume (ICV). However, evidence abounds that many brain structures have power law relationships with ICV. To take this relationship into account in volumetric imaging analysis, we propose a power law based method-the power-proportion method-for ICV correction. The performance of the new method is demonstrated using data from the PREDICT-HD study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatterplots and linear regression lines of the power-proportion corrected volumes vs. intracranial volume. (A) Caudate; (B) putamen; (C) superior frontal cortex; (D) precuneus. ICV, intracranial volume. The subscript “PPC” in the label of y-axis represents “power-proportion correction.”
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Figure 3: Scatterplots and linear regression lines of the power-proportion corrected volumes vs. intracranial volume. (A) Caudate; (B) putamen; (C) superior frontal cortex; (D) precuneus. ICV, intracranial volume. The subscript “PPC” in the label of y-axis represents “power-proportion correction.”

Mentions: To visually inspect the performance of the power-proportion method in removing the confounding effect of ICV, scatterplots of VOIPPC vs. ICV for the four VOIs are presented in Figure 3. The straight line in each plot represents the regression line between VOIPPC and ICV. The plots show each line is parallel to the x-axis, which indicates after the power-proportion correction, the ICV-corrected VOIs are uncorrelated with ICV. This is in contrast to the plots in Figure 2 based on the proportion correction method, where almost all regression lines have a negative trend.


The power-proportion method for intracranial volume correction in volumetric imaging analysis.

Liu D, Johnson HJ, Long JD, Magnotta VA, Paulsen JS - Front Neurosci (2014)

Scatterplots and linear regression lines of the power-proportion corrected volumes vs. intracranial volume. (A) Caudate; (B) putamen; (C) superior frontal cortex; (D) precuneus. ICV, intracranial volume. The subscript “PPC” in the label of y-axis represents “power-proportion correction.”
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222222&req=5

Figure 3: Scatterplots and linear regression lines of the power-proportion corrected volumes vs. intracranial volume. (A) Caudate; (B) putamen; (C) superior frontal cortex; (D) precuneus. ICV, intracranial volume. The subscript “PPC” in the label of y-axis represents “power-proportion correction.”
Mentions: To visually inspect the performance of the power-proportion method in removing the confounding effect of ICV, scatterplots of VOIPPC vs. ICV for the four VOIs are presented in Figure 3. The straight line in each plot represents the regression line between VOIPPC and ICV. The plots show each line is parallel to the x-axis, which indicates after the power-proportion correction, the ICV-corrected VOIs are uncorrelated with ICV. This is in contrast to the plots in Figure 2 based on the proportion correction method, where almost all regression lines have a negative trend.

Bottom Line: In volumetric brain imaging analysis, volumes of brain structures are typically assumed to be proportional or linearly related to intracranial volume (ICV).However, evidence abounds that many brain structures have power law relationships with ICV.The performance of the new method is demonstrated using data from the PREDICT-HD study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa Iowa City, IA, USA.

ABSTRACT
In volumetric brain imaging analysis, volumes of brain structures are typically assumed to be proportional or linearly related to intracranial volume (ICV). However, evidence abounds that many brain structures have power law relationships with ICV. To take this relationship into account in volumetric imaging analysis, we propose a power law based method-the power-proportion method-for ICV correction. The performance of the new method is demonstrated using data from the PREDICT-HD study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus