Limits...
Early wound reactions of Japanese maple during winter dormancy: the effect of two contrasting temperature regimes.

Copini P, den Ouden J, Decuyper M, Mohren GM, Loomans AJ, Sass-Klaassen U - AoB Plants (2014)

Bottom Line: We investigated the effect of two contrasting temperature regimes on early reactions of Acer palmatum trees to wounding during winter bud dormancy.In the 15 °C treatment, however, trees reacted to wounding by dieback of the cortex and phloem and by the formation of ligno-suberized layers.In the xylem, compartmentalization took place by deposition of inhibitory compounds in fibre cells and vessel elements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forest Ecology and Forest Management Group, Wageningen University, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands Paul.copini@wur.nl.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Wound reactions of dormant A. palmatum trees after being stored for 3 weeks in a climate chamber at a temperature of 4 °C. (A) Xylem and bark surrounding the wound (Wo). The virtual absence of Cd is characteristic for this cold treatment. (B) Details of the cambial zone near the wound margin, showing the TRB and dormant cambium (c). (C) Transverse section through the wood and bark surrounding the wound (arrowed). Compartmentalization of the wound by inhibitory compounds is virtually absent.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222136&req=5

PLU059F3: Wound reactions of dormant A. palmatum trees after being stored for 3 weeks in a climate chamber at a temperature of 4 °C. (A) Xylem and bark surrounding the wound (Wo). The virtual absence of Cd is characteristic for this cold treatment. (B) Details of the cambial zone near the wound margin, showing the TRB and dormant cambium (c). (C) Transverse section through the wood and bark surrounding the wound (arrowed). Compartmentalization of the wound by inhibitory compounds is virtually absent.

Mentions: In the living bark, i.e. phloem and cortex, no wound periderms were observed. Nevertheless, during both the winters (P < 0.001), we detected the formation of a ligno-suberized layer between the wounded and intact living bark in all the trees subjected to the warm treatment (Fig. 2A). This layer was absent in the trees subjected to the cold treatment. Furthermore, we observed that discolouration in the phloem and cortex was minor in trees subjected to the cold treatment (Fig. 3A), but appreciably greater in trees from the warm treatment (Fig. 2A).Figure 2.


Early wound reactions of Japanese maple during winter dormancy: the effect of two contrasting temperature regimes.

Copini P, den Ouden J, Decuyper M, Mohren GM, Loomans AJ, Sass-Klaassen U - AoB Plants (2014)

Wound reactions of dormant A. palmatum trees after being stored for 3 weeks in a climate chamber at a temperature of 4 °C. (A) Xylem and bark surrounding the wound (Wo). The virtual absence of Cd is characteristic for this cold treatment. (B) Details of the cambial zone near the wound margin, showing the TRB and dormant cambium (c). (C) Transverse section through the wood and bark surrounding the wound (arrowed). Compartmentalization of the wound by inhibitory compounds is virtually absent.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222136&req=5

PLU059F3: Wound reactions of dormant A. palmatum trees after being stored for 3 weeks in a climate chamber at a temperature of 4 °C. (A) Xylem and bark surrounding the wound (Wo). The virtual absence of Cd is characteristic for this cold treatment. (B) Details of the cambial zone near the wound margin, showing the TRB and dormant cambium (c). (C) Transverse section through the wood and bark surrounding the wound (arrowed). Compartmentalization of the wound by inhibitory compounds is virtually absent.
Mentions: In the living bark, i.e. phloem and cortex, no wound periderms were observed. Nevertheless, during both the winters (P < 0.001), we detected the formation of a ligno-suberized layer between the wounded and intact living bark in all the trees subjected to the warm treatment (Fig. 2A). This layer was absent in the trees subjected to the cold treatment. Furthermore, we observed that discolouration in the phloem and cortex was minor in trees subjected to the cold treatment (Fig. 3A), but appreciably greater in trees from the warm treatment (Fig. 2A).Figure 2.

Bottom Line: We investigated the effect of two contrasting temperature regimes on early reactions of Acer palmatum trees to wounding during winter bud dormancy.In the 15 °C treatment, however, trees reacted to wounding by dieback of the cortex and phloem and by the formation of ligno-suberized layers.In the xylem, compartmentalization took place by deposition of inhibitory compounds in fibre cells and vessel elements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forest Ecology and Forest Management Group, Wageningen University, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands Paul.copini@wur.nl.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus