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Early wound reactions of Japanese maple during winter dormancy: the effect of two contrasting temperature regimes.

Copini P, den Ouden J, Decuyper M, Mohren GM, Loomans AJ, Sass-Klaassen U - AoB Plants (2014)

Bottom Line: We investigated the effect of two contrasting temperature regimes on early reactions of Acer palmatum trees to wounding during winter bud dormancy.In the xylem, compartmentalization took place by deposition of inhibitory compounds in fibre cells and vessel elements.It therefore seems likely that trees that have been wounded during dormancy in areas with mild or warm winters might cope better with wounding, as unlike trees in cold environments, they may compartmentalize wounds even during winter dormancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forest Ecology and Forest Management Group, Wageningen University, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands Paul.copini@wur.nl.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic overview of the anatomical features which occur after wounding (Wo, wound) and were recorded or measured in the phloem (Ph), cortex (Co), cambial region (C) and xylem (Xy). In the living bark, i.e. phloem and cortex, we recorded the presence of ligno-suberized layers (Ls) and wound periderms. In the cambial zone, we measured the extent of tangential cambial dieback (Cd) and recorded the presence of callus (Ca) and local growth (Lg) of wound xylem, which develops after the TRB has been formed. In the xylem, we measured the extent of tangential xylem discolouration (Xd) left and right of the wound (Wo).
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PLU059F1: Schematic overview of the anatomical features which occur after wounding (Wo, wound) and were recorded or measured in the phloem (Ph), cortex (Co), cambial region (C) and xylem (Xy). In the living bark, i.e. phloem and cortex, we recorded the presence of ligno-suberized layers (Ls) and wound periderms. In the cambial zone, we measured the extent of tangential cambial dieback (Cd) and recorded the presence of callus (Ca) and local growth (Lg) of wound xylem, which develops after the TRB has been formed. In the xylem, we measured the extent of tangential xylem discolouration (Xd) left and right of the wound (Wo).

Mentions: We examined all the treated thin sections and recorded the presence or absence of the formation of ligno-suberized layers and wound periderms in the living bark (Fig. 1). All other analyses were based on thin sections that were stained with safranin/astra-blue solution and not treated with potassium hypochlorite. In the cambial zone, we measured the extent of tangential cambial dieback as the distance between the wound and the intact cambium (Fig. 1), using the software Leica Application Suite (version 3.6, Heerbrugg, Switzerland). In addition, the presence of callus tissue (traumatic parenchyma cells) and the locally present wound xylem were recorded after the outermost tree-ring boundary (TRB) had been located (Fig. 1). We used Leica Application Suite software (version 3.6) to determine the mean tangential width of xylem discolouration from measurements taken left and right of the wound (Fig. 1). Differences in wound response between the warm and cold treatments were tested per winter with the statistical software package SPSS version 19 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA), applying a significance level of 0.05. The effects of temperature on cambial dieback and xylem discolouration were analysed using the non-parametric Mann–Whitney U-test; the presence of ligno-suberized layers, callus and wound xylem was analysed using Pearson's Chi-square tests.Figure 1.


Early wound reactions of Japanese maple during winter dormancy: the effect of two contrasting temperature regimes.

Copini P, den Ouden J, Decuyper M, Mohren GM, Loomans AJ, Sass-Klaassen U - AoB Plants (2014)

Schematic overview of the anatomical features which occur after wounding (Wo, wound) and were recorded or measured in the phloem (Ph), cortex (Co), cambial region (C) and xylem (Xy). In the living bark, i.e. phloem and cortex, we recorded the presence of ligno-suberized layers (Ls) and wound periderms. In the cambial zone, we measured the extent of tangential cambial dieback (Cd) and recorded the presence of callus (Ca) and local growth (Lg) of wound xylem, which develops after the TRB has been formed. In the xylem, we measured the extent of tangential xylem discolouration (Xd) left and right of the wound (Wo).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222136&req=5

PLU059F1: Schematic overview of the anatomical features which occur after wounding (Wo, wound) and were recorded or measured in the phloem (Ph), cortex (Co), cambial region (C) and xylem (Xy). In the living bark, i.e. phloem and cortex, we recorded the presence of ligno-suberized layers (Ls) and wound periderms. In the cambial zone, we measured the extent of tangential cambial dieback (Cd) and recorded the presence of callus (Ca) and local growth (Lg) of wound xylem, which develops after the TRB has been formed. In the xylem, we measured the extent of tangential xylem discolouration (Xd) left and right of the wound (Wo).
Mentions: We examined all the treated thin sections and recorded the presence or absence of the formation of ligno-suberized layers and wound periderms in the living bark (Fig. 1). All other analyses were based on thin sections that were stained with safranin/astra-blue solution and not treated with potassium hypochlorite. In the cambial zone, we measured the extent of tangential cambial dieback as the distance between the wound and the intact cambium (Fig. 1), using the software Leica Application Suite (version 3.6, Heerbrugg, Switzerland). In addition, the presence of callus tissue (traumatic parenchyma cells) and the locally present wound xylem were recorded after the outermost tree-ring boundary (TRB) had been located (Fig. 1). We used Leica Application Suite software (version 3.6) to determine the mean tangential width of xylem discolouration from measurements taken left and right of the wound (Fig. 1). Differences in wound response between the warm and cold treatments were tested per winter with the statistical software package SPSS version 19 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA), applying a significance level of 0.05. The effects of temperature on cambial dieback and xylem discolouration were analysed using the non-parametric Mann–Whitney U-test; the presence of ligno-suberized layers, callus and wound xylem was analysed using Pearson's Chi-square tests.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: We investigated the effect of two contrasting temperature regimes on early reactions of Acer palmatum trees to wounding during winter bud dormancy.In the xylem, compartmentalization took place by deposition of inhibitory compounds in fibre cells and vessel elements.It therefore seems likely that trees that have been wounded during dormancy in areas with mild or warm winters might cope better with wounding, as unlike trees in cold environments, they may compartmentalize wounds even during winter dormancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forest Ecology and Forest Management Group, Wageningen University, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands Paul.copini@wur.nl.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus