Limits...
Speech in action: degree of hand preference for grasping predicts speech articulation competence in children.

Gonzalez CL, Li F, Mills KJ, Rosen N, Gibb RL - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: Specifically, we show that children (4-5 years old) who are more right-hand lateralized in picking up small food items for consumption show enhanced differentiation of the "s" and "sh" sounds.This result suggests that left hemisphere control of hand-to-mouth gestures may have provided an evolutionary platform for the development of language.The current investigation presents the exciting possibility that early right hand-to-mouth training could accelerate the development of articulation skills.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Brain in Action Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of Lethbridge Lethbridge, AB, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Highlights: Degree of lateralization for grasping predicts the maturity of the language production system in young, typically-developing children. In this report we provide compelling evidence for the relationship between right hand grasp-to-mouth (i.e., feeding) movements and language development. Specifically, we show that children (4-5 years old) who are more right-hand lateralized in picking up small food items for consumption show enhanced differentiation of the "s" and "sh" sounds. This result suggests that left hemisphere control of hand-to-mouth gestures may have provided an evolutionary platform for the development of language. The current investigation presents the exciting possibility that early right hand-to-mouth training could accelerate the development of articulation skills.

No MeSH data available.


Acoustic distance between “s” (in word seat) and “sh” (in word sheet) for a child who did not differentiate the two sounds (left) and one who clearly separated the two (right). Dotted lines indicate calculated spectral mean frequencies.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222128&req=5

Figure 1: Acoustic distance between “s” (in word seat) and “sh” (in word sheet) for a child who did not differentiate the two sounds (left) and one who clearly separated the two (right). Dotted lines indicate calculated spectral mean frequencies.

Mentions: Digital spectrographic techniques were used to quantify children's speech production as they capture the gradience of articulatory gestures in speech that are otherwise elusive through auditory perception. In articulation, the main difference between “s” and “sh” lies in the relative tongue tip position in the oral cavity as well as the presence/absence of lip protrusion. The “sh” sound is produced with rounded lips and with a more posterior tongue position than the “s” sound (Ladefoged and Maddieson, 1996). Such articulatory difference can be characterized acoustically using the spectral mean frequency, which calculates the weighted mean frequency of the sound noise spectrum (Forrest et al., 1988; Jongman et al., 2000). The “sh” displays a lower overall energy distribution frequency in the noise spectrum, resulting in lower value of spectral mean. The degree of articulatory distinction between “s” and “sh” was assessed through the acoustic distance by taking the difference of spectral mean frequency between the two sounds. The greater the distance, the more distinctly their “s” and “sh” are articulated, and the more robustly the two sounds are contrasted (Figure 1).


Speech in action: degree of hand preference for grasping predicts speech articulation competence in children.

Gonzalez CL, Li F, Mills KJ, Rosen N, Gibb RL - Front Psychol (2014)

Acoustic distance between “s” (in word seat) and “sh” (in word sheet) for a child who did not differentiate the two sounds (left) and one who clearly separated the two (right). Dotted lines indicate calculated spectral mean frequencies.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222128&req=5

Figure 1: Acoustic distance between “s” (in word seat) and “sh” (in word sheet) for a child who did not differentiate the two sounds (left) and one who clearly separated the two (right). Dotted lines indicate calculated spectral mean frequencies.
Mentions: Digital spectrographic techniques were used to quantify children's speech production as they capture the gradience of articulatory gestures in speech that are otherwise elusive through auditory perception. In articulation, the main difference between “s” and “sh” lies in the relative tongue tip position in the oral cavity as well as the presence/absence of lip protrusion. The “sh” sound is produced with rounded lips and with a more posterior tongue position than the “s” sound (Ladefoged and Maddieson, 1996). Such articulatory difference can be characterized acoustically using the spectral mean frequency, which calculates the weighted mean frequency of the sound noise spectrum (Forrest et al., 1988; Jongman et al., 2000). The “sh” displays a lower overall energy distribution frequency in the noise spectrum, resulting in lower value of spectral mean. The degree of articulatory distinction between “s” and “sh” was assessed through the acoustic distance by taking the difference of spectral mean frequency between the two sounds. The greater the distance, the more distinctly their “s” and “sh” are articulated, and the more robustly the two sounds are contrasted (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Specifically, we show that children (4-5 years old) who are more right-hand lateralized in picking up small food items for consumption show enhanced differentiation of the "s" and "sh" sounds.This result suggests that left hemisphere control of hand-to-mouth gestures may have provided an evolutionary platform for the development of language.The current investigation presents the exciting possibility that early right hand-to-mouth training could accelerate the development of articulation skills.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Brain in Action Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of Lethbridge Lethbridge, AB, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Highlights: Degree of lateralization for grasping predicts the maturity of the language production system in young, typically-developing children. In this report we provide compelling evidence for the relationship between right hand grasp-to-mouth (i.e., feeding) movements and language development. Specifically, we show that children (4-5 years old) who are more right-hand lateralized in picking up small food items for consumption show enhanced differentiation of the "s" and "sh" sounds. This result suggests that left hemisphere control of hand-to-mouth gestures may have provided an evolutionary platform for the development of language. The current investigation presents the exciting possibility that early right hand-to-mouth training could accelerate the development of articulation skills.

No MeSH data available.