Limits...
Penetrating orbit injury: challenge to emergency medicine.

Malla G, Bhandari R, Gupta PP, Giri R - BMC Res Notes (2013)

Bottom Line: The case discussion will review the initial presentation, examination, resultant management decisions, and final outcome.Resource availability and conditions at presentations may also influence the management decisions.This case presentation has described such a scenario in developing country like Nepal and is expected to be interest across various medical specialties.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Practice and Emergency Medicine, B,P,Koirala Institute of Health Sciences Dharan-18, Dharan, Nepal. dr.pramen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Penetrating orbital injuries pose a serious threat to vision, ocular motility, and in some cases, life. The setting and causes of eye injury are diverse, but previous studies have demonstrated that the risk and type of injury is often correlated with age, gender, and race. Pediatric ocular injury is often accidental and may be preventable. A focused history and prompt ocular examination are essential to immediate management.

Case presentation: This article describes a case of protruding foreign body-related penetrating orbit injury with a retained foreign body in a 4-year-old male from a town in the eastern part of Nepal. The child presented to the emergency with foreign body in situ without receiving any pre emergency care without any medical attendance. The patient was managed with non-operative removal of foreign body in the emergency. The case discussion will review the initial presentation, examination, resultant management decisions, and final outcome.

Conclusion: Foreign body presentations may be diverse and non-operative management may be considered in selected cases. Resource availability and conditions at presentations may also influence the management decisions. This case presentation has described such a scenario in developing country like Nepal and is expected to be interest across various medical specialties.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Child with foreign body in situ.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222094&req=5

Figure 2: Child with foreign body in situ.

Mentions: On arrival in our emergency department the child was fully conscious. He was hemodynamically stable with no airway or respiratory compromise. He had no past medical history and was not taking any regular medication. History revealed he was up to date with his immunizations, but history was considered unreliable. He lived with his parents and younger brother in a town in Eastern Nepal. On further examination, no other injuries were found specifically the cervical spine. Gross neurological examination was normal. The foreign body, still in situ, was a sharp wooden peg. It had penetrated the right orbit along the medial side. The cumbersome protruding object constituted a rock and a wire mesh attached to the wooden peg. The weight (approx. 1 kg) and shape of the object made stabilization of the object particularly difficult. It was impossible to evaluate the eye further due to the eye being obscured by the protruding object (Figure 2).


Penetrating orbit injury: challenge to emergency medicine.

Malla G, Bhandari R, Gupta PP, Giri R - BMC Res Notes (2013)

Child with foreign body in situ.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4222094&req=5

Figure 2: Child with foreign body in situ.
Mentions: On arrival in our emergency department the child was fully conscious. He was hemodynamically stable with no airway or respiratory compromise. He had no past medical history and was not taking any regular medication. History revealed he was up to date with his immunizations, but history was considered unreliable. He lived with his parents and younger brother in a town in Eastern Nepal. On further examination, no other injuries were found specifically the cervical spine. Gross neurological examination was normal. The foreign body, still in situ, was a sharp wooden peg. It had penetrated the right orbit along the medial side. The cumbersome protruding object constituted a rock and a wire mesh attached to the wooden peg. The weight (approx. 1 kg) and shape of the object made stabilization of the object particularly difficult. It was impossible to evaluate the eye further due to the eye being obscured by the protruding object (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The case discussion will review the initial presentation, examination, resultant management decisions, and final outcome.Resource availability and conditions at presentations may also influence the management decisions.This case presentation has described such a scenario in developing country like Nepal and is expected to be interest across various medical specialties.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Practice and Emergency Medicine, B,P,Koirala Institute of Health Sciences Dharan-18, Dharan, Nepal. dr.pramen@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Penetrating orbital injuries pose a serious threat to vision, ocular motility, and in some cases, life. The setting and causes of eye injury are diverse, but previous studies have demonstrated that the risk and type of injury is often correlated with age, gender, and race. Pediatric ocular injury is often accidental and may be preventable. A focused history and prompt ocular examination are essential to immediate management.

Case presentation: This article describes a case of protruding foreign body-related penetrating orbit injury with a retained foreign body in a 4-year-old male from a town in the eastern part of Nepal. The child presented to the emergency with foreign body in situ without receiving any pre emergency care without any medical attendance. The patient was managed with non-operative removal of foreign body in the emergency. The case discussion will review the initial presentation, examination, resultant management decisions, and final outcome.

Conclusion: Foreign body presentations may be diverse and non-operative management may be considered in selected cases. Resource availability and conditions at presentations may also influence the management decisions. This case presentation has described such a scenario in developing country like Nepal and is expected to be interest across various medical specialties.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus