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Dynamic cell culture on calcium phosphate microcarriers for bone tissue engineering applications.

Perez RA, Riccardi K, Altankov G, Ginebra MP - J Tissue Eng (2014)

Bottom Line: Initial cell attachment on the microcarriers was strongly influenced by the speed of the dynamic culture, achieving higher attachment at low speed (40 r/min) as compared to high speed (80 r/min).Under moderate culture speeds (40 r/min), the number of cells present in the culture as well as the number of microcarrier-containing cells considerably increased after 3 days, particularly in the gelatin-containing microcarriers.At longer culture times in dynamic culture, hydroxyapatite-containing microcarriers formed aggregates containing viable and extracellular matrix proteins, with a significantly higher number of cells compared to static cultures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona, Spain ; Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Zaragoza, Spain ; Department of NanoBioMedical Sciences, Dankook University, Cheonan, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Developing appropriate cell culturing techniques to populate scaffolds has become a great challenge in tissue engineering. This work describes the use of spinner flask dynamic cell cultures to populate hydroxyapatite microcarriers for bone tissue engineering. The microcarriers were obtained through the emulsion of a self-setting aqueous α-tricalcium phosphate slurry in oil. After setting, hydroxyapatite microcarriers were obtained. The incorporation of gelatin in the liquid phase of the α-tricalcium phosphate slurry allowed obtaining hybrid gelatin/hydroxyapatite-microcarriers. Initial cell attachment on the microcarriers was strongly influenced by the speed of the dynamic culture, achieving higher attachment at low speed (40 r/min) as compared to high speed (80 r/min). Under moderate culture speeds (40 r/min), the number of cells present in the culture as well as the number of microcarrier-containing cells considerably increased after 3 days, particularly in the gelatin-containing microcarriers. At longer culture times in dynamic culture, hydroxyapatite-containing microcarriers formed aggregates containing viable and extracellular matrix proteins, with a significantly higher number of cells compared to static cultures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The 2D static culture versus 3D dynamic culture in a spinner flask.2D: two-dimensional; 3D: three-dimensional.
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fig1-2041731414543965: The 2D static culture versus 3D dynamic culture in a spinner flask.2D: two-dimensional; 3D: three-dimensional.

Mentions: We have previously shown that on the HA-MC and the gelatin/HA-MC under static conditions, cells were able to attach, proliferate, and differentiate properly, although the number of cells was shown to be significantly lower than the control.13 Therefore, as represented in Figure 1, this work investigates the use of dynamic cell culturing techniques with the microporous HA and gelatin/HA-MC as a strategy to increase the yield of the cell culture, comparing their behavior in dynamic cultures with that of polymer MCs that are used as control. Although the density of the inorganic and hybrid MC is higher than that of the polymer MC, and therefore different behaviors are to be expected in dynamic cultures, our hypothesis is that the continuous agitation of the cell culture medium can increase cell attachment and consequently cell proliferation.


Dynamic cell culture on calcium phosphate microcarriers for bone tissue engineering applications.

Perez RA, Riccardi K, Altankov G, Ginebra MP - J Tissue Eng (2014)

The 2D static culture versus 3D dynamic culture in a spinner flask.2D: two-dimensional; 3D: three-dimensional.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4221955&req=5

fig1-2041731414543965: The 2D static culture versus 3D dynamic culture in a spinner flask.2D: two-dimensional; 3D: three-dimensional.
Mentions: We have previously shown that on the HA-MC and the gelatin/HA-MC under static conditions, cells were able to attach, proliferate, and differentiate properly, although the number of cells was shown to be significantly lower than the control.13 Therefore, as represented in Figure 1, this work investigates the use of dynamic cell culturing techniques with the microporous HA and gelatin/HA-MC as a strategy to increase the yield of the cell culture, comparing their behavior in dynamic cultures with that of polymer MCs that are used as control. Although the density of the inorganic and hybrid MC is higher than that of the polymer MC, and therefore different behaviors are to be expected in dynamic cultures, our hypothesis is that the continuous agitation of the cell culture medium can increase cell attachment and consequently cell proliferation.

Bottom Line: Initial cell attachment on the microcarriers was strongly influenced by the speed of the dynamic culture, achieving higher attachment at low speed (40 r/min) as compared to high speed (80 r/min).Under moderate culture speeds (40 r/min), the number of cells present in the culture as well as the number of microcarrier-containing cells considerably increased after 3 days, particularly in the gelatin-containing microcarriers.At longer culture times in dynamic culture, hydroxyapatite-containing microcarriers formed aggregates containing viable and extracellular matrix proteins, with a significantly higher number of cells compared to static cultures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona, Spain ; Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Zaragoza, Spain ; Department of NanoBioMedical Sciences, Dankook University, Cheonan, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Developing appropriate cell culturing techniques to populate scaffolds has become a great challenge in tissue engineering. This work describes the use of spinner flask dynamic cell cultures to populate hydroxyapatite microcarriers for bone tissue engineering. The microcarriers were obtained through the emulsion of a self-setting aqueous α-tricalcium phosphate slurry in oil. After setting, hydroxyapatite microcarriers were obtained. The incorporation of gelatin in the liquid phase of the α-tricalcium phosphate slurry allowed obtaining hybrid gelatin/hydroxyapatite-microcarriers. Initial cell attachment on the microcarriers was strongly influenced by the speed of the dynamic culture, achieving higher attachment at low speed (40 r/min) as compared to high speed (80 r/min). Under moderate culture speeds (40 r/min), the number of cells present in the culture as well as the number of microcarrier-containing cells considerably increased after 3 days, particularly in the gelatin-containing microcarriers. At longer culture times in dynamic culture, hydroxyapatite-containing microcarriers formed aggregates containing viable and extracellular matrix proteins, with a significantly higher number of cells compared to static cultures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus