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Listening to Mozart K.448 decreases electroencephalography oscillatory power associated with an increase in sympathetic tone in adults: a post-intervention study.

Lin LC, Ouyang CS, Chiang CT, Wu RC, Wu HC, Yang RC - JRSM Open (2014)

Bottom Line: The results showed a significant decrease in alpha, theta and beta power when they listened to Mozart K.448.In addition, the average root mean square successive difference, the proportion derived by dividing NN50 by the total number of NN intervals, standard deviations of NN intervals and standard deviations of differences between adjacent NN intervals showed a significant decrease, while the high frequency revealed a significant decrease with a significantly elevated low-frequency/high-frequency ratio.Listening to Mozart K.448 significantly decreased EEG alpha, theta and beta power and HRV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan ; Departments of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Listening to Mozart K.448 has been demonstrated to improve spatial task scores, leading to what is known as the Mozart Effect. However, most of these reports only describe the phenomena but lack the scientific evidence needed to properly investigate the mechanism of Mozart Effect. In this study, we used electroencephalography (EEG) and heart rate variability (HRV) to evaluate the effects of Mozart K.448 on healthy volunteers to explore Mozart Effect.

Design: An EEG-based post-intervention analysis.

Setting: Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Participants: Twenty-nine college students were enrolled. They received EEG and electrocardiogram examinations simultaneously before, during and after listening to the first movement of Mozart K.448.

Main outcome measure: EEG alpha, theta and beta power and HRV were compared in each stage.

Results: The results showed a significant decrease in alpha, theta and beta power when they listened to Mozart K.448. In addition, the average root mean square successive difference, the proportion derived by dividing NN50 by the total number of NN intervals, standard deviations of NN intervals and standard deviations of differences between adjacent NN intervals showed a significant decrease, while the high frequency revealed a significant decrease with a significantly elevated low-frequency/high-frequency ratio.

Conclusion: Listening to Mozart K.448 significantly decreased EEG alpha, theta and beta power and HRV. This study indicates that there is brain cortical function and sympathetic tone activation in healthy adults when listening to Mozart K.448, which may play an important role in the mechanism of Mozart Effect.

No MeSH data available.


EEG theta power during and after listening to Mozart K.448. Comparisons made with pre-music EEG. Percentage decreases in theta power over C3-T3, C4-T4 (a), T3-O1, T4-O2 (b) and O1-C3, O2-C4 (c) observed in subjects during Mozart K.448 (n = 29) and after listening to Mozart K.448. **p < 0.001, *p < 0.01.
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fig3-2054270414551657: EEG theta power during and after listening to Mozart K.448. Comparisons made with pre-music EEG. Percentage decreases in theta power over C3-T3, C4-T4 (a), T3-O1, T4-O2 (b) and O1-C3, O2-C4 (c) observed in subjects during Mozart K.448 (n = 29) and after listening to Mozart K.448. **p < 0.001, *p < 0.01.

Mentions: Similarly, significant average decreases in theta power were observed during the music listening stage when compared to the pre-music stage: 5.5 ± 11.5% in C3-T3 (p = 0.015), 5.6 ± 12.1% in C4-T4 (p = 0.019) (Figure 3(a)), 10.0 ± 15.6% in T3-O1 (p = 0.002), 12.3 ± 16.1% in T4-O2 (p < 0.001) (Figure 3(b)) and 10.6 ± 15.1% in O1-C3 (p < 0.001), 11.2 ± 15.5% in O2-C4 (p < 0.001) (Figure 3(c)). In addition, significant reductions in theta power were observed during the post-music stage when compared with the pre-music stage: 7.9 ± 19.7% in T3-O1 (p = 0.041) and 8.3 ± 19.9% in O1-C3 (p = 0.032) (Figure 3(b) and (c)).Figure 3.


Listening to Mozart K.448 decreases electroencephalography oscillatory power associated with an increase in sympathetic tone in adults: a post-intervention study.

Lin LC, Ouyang CS, Chiang CT, Wu RC, Wu HC, Yang RC - JRSM Open (2014)

EEG theta power during and after listening to Mozart K.448. Comparisons made with pre-music EEG. Percentage decreases in theta power over C3-T3, C4-T4 (a), T3-O1, T4-O2 (b) and O1-C3, O2-C4 (c) observed in subjects during Mozart K.448 (n = 29) and after listening to Mozart K.448. **p < 0.001, *p < 0.01.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4221897&req=5

fig3-2054270414551657: EEG theta power during and after listening to Mozart K.448. Comparisons made with pre-music EEG. Percentage decreases in theta power over C3-T3, C4-T4 (a), T3-O1, T4-O2 (b) and O1-C3, O2-C4 (c) observed in subjects during Mozart K.448 (n = 29) and after listening to Mozart K.448. **p < 0.001, *p < 0.01.
Mentions: Similarly, significant average decreases in theta power were observed during the music listening stage when compared to the pre-music stage: 5.5 ± 11.5% in C3-T3 (p = 0.015), 5.6 ± 12.1% in C4-T4 (p = 0.019) (Figure 3(a)), 10.0 ± 15.6% in T3-O1 (p = 0.002), 12.3 ± 16.1% in T4-O2 (p < 0.001) (Figure 3(b)) and 10.6 ± 15.1% in O1-C3 (p < 0.001), 11.2 ± 15.5% in O2-C4 (p < 0.001) (Figure 3(c)). In addition, significant reductions in theta power were observed during the post-music stage when compared with the pre-music stage: 7.9 ± 19.7% in T3-O1 (p = 0.041) and 8.3 ± 19.9% in O1-C3 (p = 0.032) (Figure 3(b) and (c)).Figure 3.

Bottom Line: The results showed a significant decrease in alpha, theta and beta power when they listened to Mozart K.448.In addition, the average root mean square successive difference, the proportion derived by dividing NN50 by the total number of NN intervals, standard deviations of NN intervals and standard deviations of differences between adjacent NN intervals showed a significant decrease, while the high frequency revealed a significant decrease with a significantly elevated low-frequency/high-frequency ratio.Listening to Mozart K.448 significantly decreased EEG alpha, theta and beta power and HRV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan ; Departments of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Listening to Mozart K.448 has been demonstrated to improve spatial task scores, leading to what is known as the Mozart Effect. However, most of these reports only describe the phenomena but lack the scientific evidence needed to properly investigate the mechanism of Mozart Effect. In this study, we used electroencephalography (EEG) and heart rate variability (HRV) to evaluate the effects of Mozart K.448 on healthy volunteers to explore Mozart Effect.

Design: An EEG-based post-intervention analysis.

Setting: Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Participants: Twenty-nine college students were enrolled. They received EEG and electrocardiogram examinations simultaneously before, during and after listening to the first movement of Mozart K.448.

Main outcome measure: EEG alpha, theta and beta power and HRV were compared in each stage.

Results: The results showed a significant decrease in alpha, theta and beta power when they listened to Mozart K.448. In addition, the average root mean square successive difference, the proportion derived by dividing NN50 by the total number of NN intervals, standard deviations of NN intervals and standard deviations of differences between adjacent NN intervals showed a significant decrease, while the high frequency revealed a significant decrease with a significantly elevated low-frequency/high-frequency ratio.

Conclusion: Listening to Mozart K.448 significantly decreased EEG alpha, theta and beta power and HRV. This study indicates that there is brain cortical function and sympathetic tone activation in healthy adults when listening to Mozart K.448, which may play an important role in the mechanism of Mozart Effect.

No MeSH data available.