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Assessing the survival of exogenous plant microRNA in mice.

Liang G, Zhu Y, Sun B, Shao Y, Jing A, Wang J, Xiao Z - Food Sci Nutr (2014)

Bottom Line: The survival of plant small RNAs from the diet in animals, however, remains unclear, and the persistence of miRNAs from dietary plants in the animal gastrointestinal (GI) tract is still under debate.Exogenous plant miRNAs were present in the sera, feces, and tissues of animals and these exogenous plant miRNAs were primarily acquired orally.The amount of miR-172 that survived passage through the GI tract varied among individuals, with a maximum of 4.5% recovered at the stomach of one individual, and had a range of 0.05-4.5% in different organs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University Nanjing, 210096, China ; School of Medical Technology and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology Luo Yang 471003, Henan, China.

ABSTRACT
MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small RNAs, are important molecules that influence several developmental processes and regulate RNA interference (RNAi), and are abundant in animals, plants, and plant tissues that are traditionally consumed in the diet. The survival of plant small RNAs from the diet in animals, however, remains unclear, and the persistence of miRNAs from dietary plants in the animal gastrointestinal (GI) tract is still under debate. In this study, ICR mice were fed plant total RNAs in quantities of 10-50 μg, extracted from Brassica oleracea. Serum, feces, and various tissues were collected from the mice after RNA consumption and analyzed for several miRNAs. Exogenous plant miRNAs were present in the sera, feces, and tissues of animals and these exogenous plant miRNAs were primarily acquired orally. MiR-172, the most highly enriched exogenous plant miRNA in B. oleracea, was found in the stomach, intestine, serum, and feces of mice that were fed plant RNA extracts including miR-172. The amount of miR-172 that survived passage through the GI tract varied among individuals, with a maximum of 4.5% recovered at the stomach of one individual, and had a range of 0.05-4.5% in different organs. Furthermore, miR-172 was detected in the blood, spleen, liver, and kidney of mice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

General characterization of small RNAs in different species. (A) Visualization of small RNAs in Brassica rapa (bra), rice, and corn. Total RNA from bra tissue, mature dry rice grain, and corn seeds. (B) RT-PCR characterized the expression of miRNA in different species. Upper, middle, lower panel: detection of miR-171, miR-172, and miR-824 in B. oleracea (bol), B. rapa (bra), B. napus (bna), Arabidopsis thaliana (ath), Solanum lycopersicum (sly), and mouse (mmu). The expression levels of indicated miRNAs evaluated by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis with 30 cycles.
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fig01: General characterization of small RNAs in different species. (A) Visualization of small RNAs in Brassica rapa (bra), rice, and corn. Total RNA from bra tissue, mature dry rice grain, and corn seeds. (B) RT-PCR characterized the expression of miRNA in different species. Upper, middle, lower panel: detection of miR-171, miR-172, and miR-824 in B. oleracea (bol), B. rapa (bra), B. napus (bna), Arabidopsis thaliana (ath), Solanum lycopersicum (sly), and mouse (mmu). The expression levels of indicated miRNAs evaluated by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis with 30 cycles.

Mentions: Total RNA extracts from plants showed a maximal yield of 905.3 μg total RNA per gram of mature plant sample, with 371.6 μg being the average total RNA yield per gram of mature seeds or plant tissue from seven independent RNA extractions (range 214.2–905.3 μg per gram of sample) (Table S1). After electrophoresis, distinct bands ∼20 and 24 nt long (small RNAs) were detected on the agarose gel. Interestingly, small RNAs were only slightly more abundant in developing tissue (B. rapa) than in mature seeds (rice, corn) (Fig. 1A). Gel analysis was repeated three times with independent RNA extractions and similar results were obtained.


Assessing the survival of exogenous plant microRNA in mice.

Liang G, Zhu Y, Sun B, Shao Y, Jing A, Wang J, Xiao Z - Food Sci Nutr (2014)

General characterization of small RNAs in different species. (A) Visualization of small RNAs in Brassica rapa (bra), rice, and corn. Total RNA from bra tissue, mature dry rice grain, and corn seeds. (B) RT-PCR characterized the expression of miRNA in different species. Upper, middle, lower panel: detection of miR-171, miR-172, and miR-824 in B. oleracea (bol), B. rapa (bra), B. napus (bna), Arabidopsis thaliana (ath), Solanum lycopersicum (sly), and mouse (mmu). The expression levels of indicated miRNAs evaluated by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis with 30 cycles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4221836&req=5

fig01: General characterization of small RNAs in different species. (A) Visualization of small RNAs in Brassica rapa (bra), rice, and corn. Total RNA from bra tissue, mature dry rice grain, and corn seeds. (B) RT-PCR characterized the expression of miRNA in different species. Upper, middle, lower panel: detection of miR-171, miR-172, and miR-824 in B. oleracea (bol), B. rapa (bra), B. napus (bna), Arabidopsis thaliana (ath), Solanum lycopersicum (sly), and mouse (mmu). The expression levels of indicated miRNAs evaluated by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis with 30 cycles.
Mentions: Total RNA extracts from plants showed a maximal yield of 905.3 μg total RNA per gram of mature plant sample, with 371.6 μg being the average total RNA yield per gram of mature seeds or plant tissue from seven independent RNA extractions (range 214.2–905.3 μg per gram of sample) (Table S1). After electrophoresis, distinct bands ∼20 and 24 nt long (small RNAs) were detected on the agarose gel. Interestingly, small RNAs were only slightly more abundant in developing tissue (B. rapa) than in mature seeds (rice, corn) (Fig. 1A). Gel analysis was repeated three times with independent RNA extractions and similar results were obtained.

Bottom Line: The survival of plant small RNAs from the diet in animals, however, remains unclear, and the persistence of miRNAs from dietary plants in the animal gastrointestinal (GI) tract is still under debate.Exogenous plant miRNAs were present in the sera, feces, and tissues of animals and these exogenous plant miRNAs were primarily acquired orally.The amount of miR-172 that survived passage through the GI tract varied among individuals, with a maximum of 4.5% recovered at the stomach of one individual, and had a range of 0.05-4.5% in different organs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University Nanjing, 210096, China ; School of Medical Technology and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology Luo Yang 471003, Henan, China.

ABSTRACT
MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small RNAs, are important molecules that influence several developmental processes and regulate RNA interference (RNAi), and are abundant in animals, plants, and plant tissues that are traditionally consumed in the diet. The survival of plant small RNAs from the diet in animals, however, remains unclear, and the persistence of miRNAs from dietary plants in the animal gastrointestinal (GI) tract is still under debate. In this study, ICR mice were fed plant total RNAs in quantities of 10-50 μg, extracted from Brassica oleracea. Serum, feces, and various tissues were collected from the mice after RNA consumption and analyzed for several miRNAs. Exogenous plant miRNAs were present in the sera, feces, and tissues of animals and these exogenous plant miRNAs were primarily acquired orally. MiR-172, the most highly enriched exogenous plant miRNA in B. oleracea, was found in the stomach, intestine, serum, and feces of mice that were fed plant RNA extracts including miR-172. The amount of miR-172 that survived passage through the GI tract varied among individuals, with a maximum of 4.5% recovered at the stomach of one individual, and had a range of 0.05-4.5% in different organs. Furthermore, miR-172 was detected in the blood, spleen, liver, and kidney of mice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus