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Nutritional and physical properties of organic Beauregard sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.)] as influenced by broiler litter application rate.

Gichuhi PN, Kpomblekou-A K, Bovell-Benjamin AC - Food Sci Nutr (2014)

Bottom Line: The current study evaluated the effect of broiler litter at rates 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 t ha(-1) (treatments T0, T0.5, T1, T2, and T3), on the nutritional and physical properties of Beauregard sweet potato.T0.5 had the highest β-carotene (262.0 μg/g), dry matter contents and had the most firm (0.040 kN) sweet potatoes with the deepest orange color (L = 60.7).Based on the study's findings, 0.5 t ha(-1) appeared to be appropriate level of broiler litter, which is consistent with Alabama's law and is also advantageous in terms of low cost of farming practices and water pollution reduction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Tuskegee University Tuskegee, Alabama, 36088.

ABSTRACT
Organic farming has been on an upward trend in recent years. However, the manures used like broiler litter have variable nutrient content, making it important to establish optimal application rate, for maximum crop yield and quality. Additionally, some states like Alabama restricts the amount of broiler litter to control excessive nutrients accumulation which can lead to surface and ground water contamination. The current study evaluated the effect of broiler litter at rates 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 t ha(-1) (treatments T0, T0.5, T1, T2, and T3), on the nutritional and physical properties of Beauregard sweet potato. Analyses were performed to determine moisture, ash, fiber, vitamin C, and β-carotene contents using oven, muffler furnace, dye, and spectrophotometric methods; texture; and color using compressive strength and L, a, b system, respectively. Ash content of the samples ranged from 0.9% to 1.4% with a very strong positive linear correlation (r = 0.9) to the broiler litter rate. However, vitamin C had a quadratic relationship with the broiler litter rate with a peaking at T0.5 (15.5 mg/100 g). The yellow color (b-value) also had a strong linear relationship with the broiler litter rate (r = 0.86). However, the other measures showed moderate, weak, or negligible correlations to the broiler litter level. T0.5 had the highest β-carotene (262.0 μg/g), dry matter contents and had the most firm (0.040 kN) sweet potatoes with the deepest orange color (L = 60.7). Based on the study's findings, 0.5 t ha(-1) appeared to be appropriate level of broiler litter, which is consistent with Alabama's law and is also advantageous in terms of low cost of farming practices and water pollution reduction.

No MeSH data available.


Correlation between the β-carotene content and color L-value of the sweet potato treatments.
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fig05: Correlation between the β-carotene content and color L-value of the sweet potato treatments.

Mentions: Treatment T0.5 sweet potatoes had the darkest (L = 60.7) orange color (Table 5), which may have been due to the high β-carotene content as reflected in Table 2. On the other hand, sweet potatoes grown with 1 t ha−1 of broiler litter which were lightest (L = 63.4) in color, had the least amount of β-carotene. Generally, deeper orange sweet potatoes had higher β-carotene content than the lighter ones as reflected in the correlation between β-carotene content and the color L-values (Fig. 5). The two characteristics had a negative correlation with r = −0.9189. Kidmose et al. (2007) observed that sweet potato with darker orange flesh had higher β-carotene content than the yellow-fleshed variety. Ameny and Wilson (1997) also found that the color L-value of sweet potatoes analyzed had a negative correlation (r = −0.74) to the β-carotene content. However, the color b-value which is the measure of yellowness, increased as the broiler litter rate increased, with a strong linear correlation of r = 0.8563.


Nutritional and physical properties of organic Beauregard sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.)] as influenced by broiler litter application rate.

Gichuhi PN, Kpomblekou-A K, Bovell-Benjamin AC - Food Sci Nutr (2014)

Correlation between the β-carotene content and color L-value of the sweet potato treatments.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4221831&req=5

fig05: Correlation between the β-carotene content and color L-value of the sweet potato treatments.
Mentions: Treatment T0.5 sweet potatoes had the darkest (L = 60.7) orange color (Table 5), which may have been due to the high β-carotene content as reflected in Table 2. On the other hand, sweet potatoes grown with 1 t ha−1 of broiler litter which were lightest (L = 63.4) in color, had the least amount of β-carotene. Generally, deeper orange sweet potatoes had higher β-carotene content than the lighter ones as reflected in the correlation between β-carotene content and the color L-values (Fig. 5). The two characteristics had a negative correlation with r = −0.9189. Kidmose et al. (2007) observed that sweet potato with darker orange flesh had higher β-carotene content than the yellow-fleshed variety. Ameny and Wilson (1997) also found that the color L-value of sweet potatoes analyzed had a negative correlation (r = −0.74) to the β-carotene content. However, the color b-value which is the measure of yellowness, increased as the broiler litter rate increased, with a strong linear correlation of r = 0.8563.

Bottom Line: The current study evaluated the effect of broiler litter at rates 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 t ha(-1) (treatments T0, T0.5, T1, T2, and T3), on the nutritional and physical properties of Beauregard sweet potato.T0.5 had the highest β-carotene (262.0 μg/g), dry matter contents and had the most firm (0.040 kN) sweet potatoes with the deepest orange color (L = 60.7).Based on the study's findings, 0.5 t ha(-1) appeared to be appropriate level of broiler litter, which is consistent with Alabama's law and is also advantageous in terms of low cost of farming practices and water pollution reduction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Tuskegee University Tuskegee, Alabama, 36088.

ABSTRACT
Organic farming has been on an upward trend in recent years. However, the manures used like broiler litter have variable nutrient content, making it important to establish optimal application rate, for maximum crop yield and quality. Additionally, some states like Alabama restricts the amount of broiler litter to control excessive nutrients accumulation which can lead to surface and ground water contamination. The current study evaluated the effect of broiler litter at rates 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 t ha(-1) (treatments T0, T0.5, T1, T2, and T3), on the nutritional and physical properties of Beauregard sweet potato. Analyses were performed to determine moisture, ash, fiber, vitamin C, and β-carotene contents using oven, muffler furnace, dye, and spectrophotometric methods; texture; and color using compressive strength and L, a, b system, respectively. Ash content of the samples ranged from 0.9% to 1.4% with a very strong positive linear correlation (r = 0.9) to the broiler litter rate. However, vitamin C had a quadratic relationship with the broiler litter rate with a peaking at T0.5 (15.5 mg/100 g). The yellow color (b-value) also had a strong linear relationship with the broiler litter rate (r = 0.86). However, the other measures showed moderate, weak, or negligible correlations to the broiler litter level. T0.5 had the highest β-carotene (262.0 μg/g), dry matter contents and had the most firm (0.040 kN) sweet potatoes with the deepest orange color (L = 60.7). Based on the study's findings, 0.5 t ha(-1) appeared to be appropriate level of broiler litter, which is consistent with Alabama's law and is also advantageous in terms of low cost of farming practices and water pollution reduction.

No MeSH data available.