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Leaf nitrogen and phosphorus of temperate desert plants in response to climate and soil nutrient availability.

He M, Dijkstra FA, Zhang K, Li X, Tan H, Gao Y, Li G - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: The effects of both climate and soil nutrient conditions on N and P concentrations among desert plant life forms (annual, perennial and shrub) remain unclear.Our study indicated that leaf N and P across the three life forms were influenced by soil P.Deep-rooted plants may enhance the availability of P in the surface soil facilitating growth of shallow-rooted life forms in this N and P limited system, but further research is warranted on this aspect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shapotou Desert Research and Experiment Station, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou. 730000, China.

ABSTRACT
In desert ecosystems, plant growth and nutrient uptake are restricted by availability of soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). The effects of both climate and soil nutrient conditions on N and P concentrations among desert plant life forms (annual, perennial and shrub) remain unclear. We assessed leaf N and P levels of 54 desert plants and measured the corresponding soil N and P in shallow (0-10 cm), middle (10-40 cm) and deep soil layers (40-100 cm), at 52 sites in a temperate desert of northwest China. Leaf P and N:P ratios varied markedly among life forms. Leaf P was higher in annuals and perennials than in shrubs. Leaf N and P showed a negative relationship with mean annual temperature (MAT) and no relationship with mean annual precipitation (MAP), but a positive relationship with soil P. Leaf P of shrubs was positively related to soil P in the deep soil. Our study indicated that leaf N and P across the three life forms were influenced by soil P. Deep-rooted plants may enhance the availability of P in the surface soil facilitating growth of shallow-rooted life forms in this N and P limited system, but further research is warranted on this aspect.

Show MeSH
Soil N, P and N:P with soil depth.The values of (a) total soil nitrogen (TN); (b) total soil phosphorus (TP) and (c) soil N:P ratio averaged by all sample sites (n = 52). Letters indicate significant differences of the mean ± SE at P ≤ 0.05 using Tukey's HSD test.
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f2: Soil N, P and N:P with soil depth.The values of (a) total soil nitrogen (TN); (b) total soil phosphorus (TP) and (c) soil N:P ratio averaged by all sample sites (n = 52). Letters indicate significant differences of the mean ± SE at P ≤ 0.05 using Tukey's HSD test.

Mentions: Across all sites, total soil N and P were strongly correlated (Figure 1). Total soil N and P concentrations were highest at the surface and decreased with depth (Figure 2). On the other hand, total soil N:P did not show a clear pattern with soil depth and there were no significant differences among the three layers.


Leaf nitrogen and phosphorus of temperate desert plants in response to climate and soil nutrient availability.

He M, Dijkstra FA, Zhang K, Li X, Tan H, Gao Y, Li G - Sci Rep (2014)

Soil N, P and N:P with soil depth.The values of (a) total soil nitrogen (TN); (b) total soil phosphorus (TP) and (c) soil N:P ratio averaged by all sample sites (n = 52). Letters indicate significant differences of the mean ± SE at P ≤ 0.05 using Tukey's HSD test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4221785&req=5

f2: Soil N, P and N:P with soil depth.The values of (a) total soil nitrogen (TN); (b) total soil phosphorus (TP) and (c) soil N:P ratio averaged by all sample sites (n = 52). Letters indicate significant differences of the mean ± SE at P ≤ 0.05 using Tukey's HSD test.
Mentions: Across all sites, total soil N and P were strongly correlated (Figure 1). Total soil N and P concentrations were highest at the surface and decreased with depth (Figure 2). On the other hand, total soil N:P did not show a clear pattern with soil depth and there were no significant differences among the three layers.

Bottom Line: The effects of both climate and soil nutrient conditions on N and P concentrations among desert plant life forms (annual, perennial and shrub) remain unclear.Our study indicated that leaf N and P across the three life forms were influenced by soil P.Deep-rooted plants may enhance the availability of P in the surface soil facilitating growth of shallow-rooted life forms in this N and P limited system, but further research is warranted on this aspect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shapotou Desert Research and Experiment Station, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou. 730000, China.

ABSTRACT
In desert ecosystems, plant growth and nutrient uptake are restricted by availability of soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). The effects of both climate and soil nutrient conditions on N and P concentrations among desert plant life forms (annual, perennial and shrub) remain unclear. We assessed leaf N and P levels of 54 desert plants and measured the corresponding soil N and P in shallow (0-10 cm), middle (10-40 cm) and deep soil layers (40-100 cm), at 52 sites in a temperate desert of northwest China. Leaf P and N:P ratios varied markedly among life forms. Leaf P was higher in annuals and perennials than in shrubs. Leaf N and P showed a negative relationship with mean annual temperature (MAT) and no relationship with mean annual precipitation (MAP), but a positive relationship with soil P. Leaf P of shrubs was positively related to soil P in the deep soil. Our study indicated that leaf N and P across the three life forms were influenced by soil P. Deep-rooted plants may enhance the availability of P in the surface soil facilitating growth of shallow-rooted life forms in this N and P limited system, but further research is warranted on this aspect.

Show MeSH