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Differentiation-inducing and anti-proliferative activities of lupeol on canine melanoma cells.

Ogihara K, Naya Y, Okamoto Y, Hata K - Springerplus (2014)

Bottom Line: We found that lupeol, a lupine triterpene, inhibited mouse melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing cell differentiation.Furthermore, we transplanted canine melanoma cells into a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse, and studied the anti-progressive effects of lupeol on tumor tissue.The gene expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, tyrosinase, and tyrosinase-related protein-2, which are markers of pigment cell differentiation, was induced in 4 canine oral malignant melanoma cells by lupeol, and the agent markedly inhibited tumor progression in canine melanoma-bearing mice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Life and Environmental Science, Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5201 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Canine melanoma is the most common oral malignant tumor reported in the field of veterinary medicine. We found that lupeol, a lupine triterpene, inhibited mouse melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing cell differentiation. In the present study, we examined the differentiation-inducing activities of lupeol on 4 canine melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The induction of canine melanoma cell differentiation by lupeol was confirmed by evaluating some differentiation markers such as tyrosinase with real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, we transplanted canine melanoma cells into a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse, and studied the anti-progressive effects of lupeol on tumor tissue. The gene expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, tyrosinase, and tyrosinase-related protein-2, which are markers of pigment cell differentiation, was induced in 4 canine oral malignant melanoma cells by lupeol, and the agent markedly inhibited tumor progression in canine melanoma-bearing mice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Attenuation of the expression of PCNA and Ki67 genes by lupeol. Four canine melanoma cells (2 × 105 cells) were treated without (white bar) or with lupeol at IC50 values against each melanoma cell (gray bar) for 48 h, and the gene expression of PCNA and Ki67 was measured by real-time RT-PCR. ** p < 0.01 vs untreated cells (n = 3).
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Fig3: Attenuation of the expression of PCNA and Ki67 genes by lupeol. Four canine melanoma cells (2 × 105 cells) were treated without (white bar) or with lupeol at IC50 values against each melanoma cell (gray bar) for 48 h, and the gene expression of PCNA and Ki67 was measured by real-time RT-PCR. ** p < 0.01 vs untreated cells (n = 3).

Mentions: Data are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation (SD). The significance of differences was analyzed using the Student’s t-test (Figures 1, 2, 3) and one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s multiple comparison test (Figure 4). A value of p < 0.05 was considered significant.Figure 1


Differentiation-inducing and anti-proliferative activities of lupeol on canine melanoma cells.

Ogihara K, Naya Y, Okamoto Y, Hata K - Springerplus (2014)

Attenuation of the expression of PCNA and Ki67 genes by lupeol. Four canine melanoma cells (2 × 105 cells) were treated without (white bar) or with lupeol at IC50 values against each melanoma cell (gray bar) for 48 h, and the gene expression of PCNA and Ki67 was measured by real-time RT-PCR. ** p < 0.01 vs untreated cells (n = 3).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4221559&req=5

Fig3: Attenuation of the expression of PCNA and Ki67 genes by lupeol. Four canine melanoma cells (2 × 105 cells) were treated without (white bar) or with lupeol at IC50 values against each melanoma cell (gray bar) for 48 h, and the gene expression of PCNA and Ki67 was measured by real-time RT-PCR. ** p < 0.01 vs untreated cells (n = 3).
Mentions: Data are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation (SD). The significance of differences was analyzed using the Student’s t-test (Figures 1, 2, 3) and one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s multiple comparison test (Figure 4). A value of p < 0.05 was considered significant.Figure 1

Bottom Line: We found that lupeol, a lupine triterpene, inhibited mouse melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing cell differentiation.Furthermore, we transplanted canine melanoma cells into a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse, and studied the anti-progressive effects of lupeol on tumor tissue.The gene expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, tyrosinase, and tyrosinase-related protein-2, which are markers of pigment cell differentiation, was induced in 4 canine oral malignant melanoma cells by lupeol, and the agent markedly inhibited tumor progression in canine melanoma-bearing mice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Life and Environmental Science, Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5201 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Canine melanoma is the most common oral malignant tumor reported in the field of veterinary medicine. We found that lupeol, a lupine triterpene, inhibited mouse melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing cell differentiation. In the present study, we examined the differentiation-inducing activities of lupeol on 4 canine melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The induction of canine melanoma cell differentiation by lupeol was confirmed by evaluating some differentiation markers such as tyrosinase with real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, we transplanted canine melanoma cells into a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse, and studied the anti-progressive effects of lupeol on tumor tissue. The gene expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, tyrosinase, and tyrosinase-related protein-2, which are markers of pigment cell differentiation, was induced in 4 canine oral malignant melanoma cells by lupeol, and the agent markedly inhibited tumor progression in canine melanoma-bearing mice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus