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Differentiation-inducing and anti-proliferative activities of lupeol on canine melanoma cells.

Ogihara K, Naya Y, Okamoto Y, Hata K - Springerplus (2014)

Bottom Line: We found that lupeol, a lupine triterpene, inhibited mouse melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing cell differentiation.Furthermore, we transplanted canine melanoma cells into a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse, and studied the anti-progressive effects of lupeol on tumor tissue.The gene expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, tyrosinase, and tyrosinase-related protein-2, which are markers of pigment cell differentiation, was induced in 4 canine oral malignant melanoma cells by lupeol, and the agent markedly inhibited tumor progression in canine melanoma-bearing mice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Life and Environmental Science, Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5201 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Canine melanoma is the most common oral malignant tumor reported in the field of veterinary medicine. We found that lupeol, a lupine triterpene, inhibited mouse melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing cell differentiation. In the present study, we examined the differentiation-inducing activities of lupeol on 4 canine melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The induction of canine melanoma cell differentiation by lupeol was confirmed by evaluating some differentiation markers such as tyrosinase with real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, we transplanted canine melanoma cells into a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse, and studied the anti-progressive effects of lupeol on tumor tissue. The gene expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, tyrosinase, and tyrosinase-related protein-2, which are markers of pigment cell differentiation, was induced in 4 canine oral malignant melanoma cells by lupeol, and the agent markedly inhibited tumor progression in canine melanoma-bearing mice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Antiproliferative activity against 4 canine melanoma cells. Canine melanoma cells (1 × 104 cells) were treated without (white bar) or with 10 μM lupeol (gray bar) for 4 days, and the viable cell number was subsequently counted by the Trypan blue exclusion method. * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01 vs untreated cells (n = 3).
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Fig2: Antiproliferative activity against 4 canine melanoma cells. Canine melanoma cells (1 × 104 cells) were treated without (white bar) or with 10 μM lupeol (gray bar) for 4 days, and the viable cell number was subsequently counted by the Trypan blue exclusion method. * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01 vs untreated cells (n = 3).

Mentions: Data are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation (SD). The significance of differences was analyzed using the Student’s t-test (Figures 1, 2, 3) and one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s multiple comparison test (Figure 4). A value of p < 0.05 was considered significant.Figure 1


Differentiation-inducing and anti-proliferative activities of lupeol on canine melanoma cells.

Ogihara K, Naya Y, Okamoto Y, Hata K - Springerplus (2014)

Antiproliferative activity against 4 canine melanoma cells. Canine melanoma cells (1 × 104 cells) were treated without (white bar) or with 10 μM lupeol (gray bar) for 4 days, and the viable cell number was subsequently counted by the Trypan blue exclusion method. * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01 vs untreated cells (n = 3).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4221559&req=5

Fig2: Antiproliferative activity against 4 canine melanoma cells. Canine melanoma cells (1 × 104 cells) were treated without (white bar) or with 10 μM lupeol (gray bar) for 4 days, and the viable cell number was subsequently counted by the Trypan blue exclusion method. * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01 vs untreated cells (n = 3).
Mentions: Data are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation (SD). The significance of differences was analyzed using the Student’s t-test (Figures 1, 2, 3) and one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s multiple comparison test (Figure 4). A value of p < 0.05 was considered significant.Figure 1

Bottom Line: We found that lupeol, a lupine triterpene, inhibited mouse melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing cell differentiation.Furthermore, we transplanted canine melanoma cells into a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse, and studied the anti-progressive effects of lupeol on tumor tissue.The gene expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, tyrosinase, and tyrosinase-related protein-2, which are markers of pigment cell differentiation, was induced in 4 canine oral malignant melanoma cells by lupeol, and the agent markedly inhibited tumor progression in canine melanoma-bearing mice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Life and Environmental Science, Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5201 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Canine melanoma is the most common oral malignant tumor reported in the field of veterinary medicine. We found that lupeol, a lupine triterpene, inhibited mouse melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing cell differentiation. In the present study, we examined the differentiation-inducing activities of lupeol on 4 canine melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The induction of canine melanoma cell differentiation by lupeol was confirmed by evaluating some differentiation markers such as tyrosinase with real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, we transplanted canine melanoma cells into a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse, and studied the anti-progressive effects of lupeol on tumor tissue. The gene expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, tyrosinase, and tyrosinase-related protein-2, which are markers of pigment cell differentiation, was induced in 4 canine oral malignant melanoma cells by lupeol, and the agent markedly inhibited tumor progression in canine melanoma-bearing mice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus