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The expansion of the pulmonary rib cage during breath stacking is influenced by age in obese women.

Barcelar Jde M, Aliverti A, Rattes C, Ximenes ME, Campos SL, Brandão DC, Fregonezi G, de Andrade AD - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Age was significantly lower in group 1 than group 2.During breath stacking, inspiratory capacity was significant differences in obese subjects with a smaller expansion of the pulmonary rib cage and a greater expansion of the abdomen compared to controls and also between groups 1 and 2.A significant inverse linear relationship was found between age and inspiratory capacity of the pulmonary rib cage but not of the abdomen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Pernambuco, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze in obese women the acute effects of the breath stacking technique on thoraco-abdominal expansion.

Design and methods: Nineteen obese women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) were evaluated by anthropometry, spirometry and maximal respiratory muscle pressures and successively analyzed by Opto-Electronic Plethysmography and a Wright respirometer during quiet breathing and breath stacking maneuvers and compared with a group of 15 normal-weighted healthy women. The acute effects of the maneuvers were assessed in terms of total and compartmental chest wall volumes at baseline, end of the breath stacking maneuver and after the maneuver. Obese subjects were successively classified into two groups, accordingly to the response during the maneuver, group 1 = prevalent rib cage or group 2 = abdominal expansion.

Results: Age was significantly lower in group 1 than group 2. When considering the two obese groups, FEV1 was lower and minute ventilation was higher only in group 2 compared to controls group. During breath stacking, inspiratory capacity was significant differences in obese subjects with a smaller expansion of the pulmonary rib cage and a greater expansion of the abdomen compared to controls and also between groups 1 and 2. A significant inverse linear relationship was found between age and inspiratory capacity of the pulmonary rib cage but not of the abdomen.

Conclusions: In obese women the maximal expansion of the rib cage and abdomen is influenced by age and breath stacking maneuver could be a possible therapy for preventing respiratory complications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between inspiratory capacity of pulmonary rib cage (IC,RCp)and age (left panel) and between inspiratory capacity of the abdomen and age (right panel).Closed symbols: individuals belonging to group 1. Open symbols: individuals belonging to group 2. The straight line in the left panel shows the linear regression of the data (IC,RCp = 1.308–0.0148 * age, r2 = 0.290, p = 0.0017).
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pone-0110959-g004: Relationship between inspiratory capacity of pulmonary rib cage (IC,RCp)and age (left panel) and between inspiratory capacity of the abdomen and age (right panel).Closed symbols: individuals belonging to group 1. Open symbols: individuals belonging to group 2. The straight line in the left panel shows the linear regression of the data (IC,RCp = 1.308–0.0148 * age, r2 = 0.290, p = 0.0017).

Mentions: A significant inverse linear relationship was found between age and inspiratory capacity of the pulmonary rib cage (IC,RCp = 1.308–0.0148 * age, r2 = 0.290, p = 0.0017) but not of the abdomen (Fig. 4).


The expansion of the pulmonary rib cage during breath stacking is influenced by age in obese women.

Barcelar Jde M, Aliverti A, Rattes C, Ximenes ME, Campos SL, Brandão DC, Fregonezi G, de Andrade AD - PLoS ONE (2014)

Relationship between inspiratory capacity of pulmonary rib cage (IC,RCp)and age (left panel) and between inspiratory capacity of the abdomen and age (right panel).Closed symbols: individuals belonging to group 1. Open symbols: individuals belonging to group 2. The straight line in the left panel shows the linear regression of the data (IC,RCp = 1.308–0.0148 * age, r2 = 0.290, p = 0.0017).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4220958&req=5

pone-0110959-g004: Relationship between inspiratory capacity of pulmonary rib cage (IC,RCp)and age (left panel) and between inspiratory capacity of the abdomen and age (right panel).Closed symbols: individuals belonging to group 1. Open symbols: individuals belonging to group 2. The straight line in the left panel shows the linear regression of the data (IC,RCp = 1.308–0.0148 * age, r2 = 0.290, p = 0.0017).
Mentions: A significant inverse linear relationship was found between age and inspiratory capacity of the pulmonary rib cage (IC,RCp = 1.308–0.0148 * age, r2 = 0.290, p = 0.0017) but not of the abdomen (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: Age was significantly lower in group 1 than group 2.During breath stacking, inspiratory capacity was significant differences in obese subjects with a smaller expansion of the pulmonary rib cage and a greater expansion of the abdomen compared to controls and also between groups 1 and 2.A significant inverse linear relationship was found between age and inspiratory capacity of the pulmonary rib cage but not of the abdomen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Pernambuco, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze in obese women the acute effects of the breath stacking technique on thoraco-abdominal expansion.

Design and methods: Nineteen obese women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) were evaluated by anthropometry, spirometry and maximal respiratory muscle pressures and successively analyzed by Opto-Electronic Plethysmography and a Wright respirometer during quiet breathing and breath stacking maneuvers and compared with a group of 15 normal-weighted healthy women. The acute effects of the maneuvers were assessed in terms of total and compartmental chest wall volumes at baseline, end of the breath stacking maneuver and after the maneuver. Obese subjects were successively classified into two groups, accordingly to the response during the maneuver, group 1 = prevalent rib cage or group 2 = abdominal expansion.

Results: Age was significantly lower in group 1 than group 2. When considering the two obese groups, FEV1 was lower and minute ventilation was higher only in group 2 compared to controls group. During breath stacking, inspiratory capacity was significant differences in obese subjects with a smaller expansion of the pulmonary rib cage and a greater expansion of the abdomen compared to controls and also between groups 1 and 2. A significant inverse linear relationship was found between age and inspiratory capacity of the pulmonary rib cage but not of the abdomen.

Conclusions: In obese women the maximal expansion of the rib cage and abdomen is influenced by age and breath stacking maneuver could be a possible therapy for preventing respiratory complications.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus