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Malaria, schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminth burden and their correlation with anemia in children attending primary schools in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.

Matangila JR, Doua JY, Linsuke S, Madinga J, Inocêncio da Luz R, Van Geertruyden JP, Lutumba P - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Girls were associated with S. mansoni infection (p = 0.04).Co-infection with malaria-S. mansoni and malaria-STH was, respectively, 1.5% (CI95%:0.7-3.3) and 6.4% (CI95% 4.4-9.1).Therefore, specific school-based interventions, such as intermittent preventive treatment or prophylaxis, LLITN distribution, anthelminthic mass treatment and micronutrient supplementation are needed to improve school children's health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Département de Médecine Tropicale, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, République Démocratique du Congo; Department of Epidemiology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Background: Anaemia reduces cognitive potential in school children, retards their growth and predisposes them to other diseases. As there is a paucity of data on the current burden of P. falciparum, S. mansoni and soil transmitted helminths (STH) infections and their correlation with schoolchildren's anemia in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), we collect these data.

Methods: This study reports baseline data collected from a randomized controlled trial investigating the impact of IPT with SP and SP-PQ on anemia and malaria morbidity in Congolese schoolchildren (Trial registration: NCT01722539; PACTR201211000449323). S. mansoni and STH infections were assessed using kato-katz technique. Malaria infection and hemoglobin concentration were assessed using Blood smear and Hemocontrol device, respectively.

Results: A total of 616 primary schoolchildren from 4 to 13 years old were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of Plasmodium spp. infection was 18.5% (95%CI:15.6-21.9). Amongst those infected, 24 (21%), 40 (35.1%), 40 (35.1%), 10 (8.8%), had light, moderate, heavy, very high malaria parasite density, respectively. Above 9 years of age (p = 0.02), male and history of fever (p = 0.04) were both associated with malaria infection. The overall prevalence of S. mansoni infection was 6.4% (95%CI:4.4-9.1). Girls were associated with S. mansoni infection (p = 0.04). T. trichiura was the most prevalent STH infection (26.3%), followed by A. lumbricoides (20.1%). Co-infection with malaria-S. mansoni and malaria-STH was, respectively, 1.5% (CI95%:0.7-3.3) and 6.4% (CI95% 4.4-9.1). The prevalence of anemia was found to be 41.6% (95%CI:37.7-45.6) and anemia was strongly related with Plasmodium ssp infection (aOR:4.1; CI95%:2.6-6.5;p<0.001) and S. mansoni infection (aOR:3.3;CI95%:1.4-7.8;p<0.01).

Conclusion: Malaria and S. mansoni infection were strongly associated with high prevalence of anemia in schoolchildren. Therefore, specific school-based interventions, such as intermittent preventive treatment or prophylaxis, LLITN distribution, anthelminthic mass treatment and micronutrient supplementation are needed to improve school children's health.

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Venn diagram showing Malaria – S. mansoni and malaria – STH infections co-infections.
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pone-0110789-g002: Venn diagram showing Malaria – S. mansoni and malaria – STH infections co-infections.

Mentions: Co-infection with malaria and a helminth was common though we did not observe any S. mansoni-STH co-infection. The prevalence rate of malaria-S. mansoni and malaria-STH co-infections was respectively 1.5% (CI95%:0.7–3.3) and 6.4% (CI95% 4.4–9.1) (fig. 2). There was no association found between helminth status and malaria infection (p = 0.3) or schistosomiasis and malaria infection (p = 0.7) (data not shown). Co-infection with at least two parasite species (Malaria-S. mansoni, Malaria- STH or between two STH species) was found in 79 participants (17,3%;CI95%:15.3–20.8).


Malaria, schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminth burden and their correlation with anemia in children attending primary schools in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.

Matangila JR, Doua JY, Linsuke S, Madinga J, Inocêncio da Luz R, Van Geertruyden JP, Lutumba P - PLoS ONE (2014)

Venn diagram showing Malaria – S. mansoni and malaria – STH infections co-infections.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4220949&req=5

pone-0110789-g002: Venn diagram showing Malaria – S. mansoni and malaria – STH infections co-infections.
Mentions: Co-infection with malaria and a helminth was common though we did not observe any S. mansoni-STH co-infection. The prevalence rate of malaria-S. mansoni and malaria-STH co-infections was respectively 1.5% (CI95%:0.7–3.3) and 6.4% (CI95% 4.4–9.1) (fig. 2). There was no association found between helminth status and malaria infection (p = 0.3) or schistosomiasis and malaria infection (p = 0.7) (data not shown). Co-infection with at least two parasite species (Malaria-S. mansoni, Malaria- STH or between two STH species) was found in 79 participants (17,3%;CI95%:15.3–20.8).

Bottom Line: Girls were associated with S. mansoni infection (p = 0.04).Co-infection with malaria-S. mansoni and malaria-STH was, respectively, 1.5% (CI95%:0.7-3.3) and 6.4% (CI95% 4.4-9.1).Therefore, specific school-based interventions, such as intermittent preventive treatment or prophylaxis, LLITN distribution, anthelminthic mass treatment and micronutrient supplementation are needed to improve school children's health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Département de Médecine Tropicale, Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, République Démocratique du Congo; Department of Epidemiology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Background: Anaemia reduces cognitive potential in school children, retards their growth and predisposes them to other diseases. As there is a paucity of data on the current burden of P. falciparum, S. mansoni and soil transmitted helminths (STH) infections and their correlation with schoolchildren's anemia in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), we collect these data.

Methods: This study reports baseline data collected from a randomized controlled trial investigating the impact of IPT with SP and SP-PQ on anemia and malaria morbidity in Congolese schoolchildren (Trial registration: NCT01722539; PACTR201211000449323). S. mansoni and STH infections were assessed using kato-katz technique. Malaria infection and hemoglobin concentration were assessed using Blood smear and Hemocontrol device, respectively.

Results: A total of 616 primary schoolchildren from 4 to 13 years old were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of Plasmodium spp. infection was 18.5% (95%CI:15.6-21.9). Amongst those infected, 24 (21%), 40 (35.1%), 40 (35.1%), 10 (8.8%), had light, moderate, heavy, very high malaria parasite density, respectively. Above 9 years of age (p = 0.02), male and history of fever (p = 0.04) were both associated with malaria infection. The overall prevalence of S. mansoni infection was 6.4% (95%CI:4.4-9.1). Girls were associated with S. mansoni infection (p = 0.04). T. trichiura was the most prevalent STH infection (26.3%), followed by A. lumbricoides (20.1%). Co-infection with malaria-S. mansoni and malaria-STH was, respectively, 1.5% (CI95%:0.7-3.3) and 6.4% (CI95% 4.4-9.1). The prevalence of anemia was found to be 41.6% (95%CI:37.7-45.6) and anemia was strongly related with Plasmodium ssp infection (aOR:4.1; CI95%:2.6-6.5;p<0.001) and S. mansoni infection (aOR:3.3;CI95%:1.4-7.8;p<0.01).

Conclusion: Malaria and S. mansoni infection were strongly associated with high prevalence of anemia in schoolchildren. Therefore, specific school-based interventions, such as intermittent preventive treatment or prophylaxis, LLITN distribution, anthelminthic mass treatment and micronutrient supplementation are needed to improve school children's health.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus