Limits...
Type 1 diabetes and autoimmunity.

Kawasaki E - Clin Pediatr Endocrinol (2014)

Bottom Line: In a combined analysis, 94% of Japanese patients with T1D can be defined as having type 1A diabetes.Furthermore, autoantibodies to ZnT8 and IA-2 are associated with childhood-onset and acute-onset patients.Thus, it is important to develop a diagnostic strategy for patients with type 1A diabetes in consideration of the age or mode of disease onset.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diabetes and Metabolism, Nagasaki Harbor Medical Center City Hospital, Nagasaki, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by the autoimmune response against pancreatic β cells. T1D is often complicated with other autoimmune diseases, and anti-islet autoantibodies precede the clinical onset of disease. The most common coexisting organ-specific autoimmune disease in patients with T1D is autoimmune thyroid disease, and its frequency is estimated at > 90% among patients with T1D and autoimmune diseases. The prevalence of anti-thyroid antibodies in children with T1D at disease onset is about 20% and is particularly common in girls. Furthermore, patients with anti-thyroid antibodies are 18 times more likely to develop thyroid disease than patients without anti-thyroid antibodies. Therefore, for early detection of autoimmune thyroid disease in children with T1D, measurement of anti-thyroid antibodies and TSH at T1D onset and in yearly intervals after the age of 12 yr is recommended. Anti-islet autoantibodies are predictive and diagnostic markers for T1D. The most frequently detected autoantibodies in Japanese patients are GAD autoantibodies (~80%) followed by IA-2 autoantibodies (~60%), insulin autoantibodies (~55%) and ZnT8 autoantibodies (~50%). In a combined analysis, 94% of Japanese patients with T1D can be defined as having type 1A diabetes. Furthermore, autoantibodies to ZnT8 and IA-2 are associated with childhood-onset and acute-onset patients. Thus, it is important to develop a diagnostic strategy for patients with type 1A diabetes in consideration of the age or mode of disease onset.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Risk for the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in children with type 1diabetes. TPO, thyroid peroxidase antibodies. (Material from this publication has beenused with the permission of American Diabetes Association from Glastras SJ, etal.: The role of autoimmunity at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in thedevelopment of thyroid and celiac disease and microvascular complications. DiabetesCare 2005; 28(9): 2170-2175. Copyright and allrights reserved.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219937&req=5

fig_001: Risk for the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in children with type 1diabetes. TPO, thyroid peroxidase antibodies. (Material from this publication has beenused with the permission of American Diabetes Association from Glastras SJ, etal.: The role of autoimmunity at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in thedevelopment of thyroid and celiac disease and microvascular complications. DiabetesCare 2005; 28(9): 2170-2175. Copyright and allrights reserved.)

Mentions: It is well known that T1D is frequently associated with other organ-specific autoimmunediseases, including autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), pernicious anemia, and idiopathicAddison’s disease (4). Table 1Table 1The prevalence of autoimmune disease complicating type 1 diabetes summarizes the prevalence of organ-specific autoimmune disease complicatingT1D in Japanese and Caucasoid patients (5). InJapanese patients with T1D, the most common coexisting organ-specific autoimmune disease isAITD (> 90%). The prevalence of anti-thyroid autoantibodies in children with T1D atdisease onset is about 20%, and anti-thyroid autoantibodies are particularly common ingirls. Furthermore, it is reported that the prevalence of anti-thyroid antibodies increaseswith increasing age and that the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies at diagnosis of T1Dpredicts the development of future thyroid disease (6). Patients with anti-thyroid antibodies are 18 times more likely to developthyroid disease than patients without anti-thyroid antibodies (7) (Fig.1Fig. 1.


Type 1 diabetes and autoimmunity.

Kawasaki E - Clin Pediatr Endocrinol (2014)

Risk for the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in children with type 1diabetes. TPO, thyroid peroxidase antibodies. (Material from this publication has beenused with the permission of American Diabetes Association from Glastras SJ, etal.: The role of autoimmunity at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in thedevelopment of thyroid and celiac disease and microvascular complications. DiabetesCare 2005; 28(9): 2170-2175. Copyright and allrights reserved.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219937&req=5

fig_001: Risk for the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in children with type 1diabetes. TPO, thyroid peroxidase antibodies. (Material from this publication has beenused with the permission of American Diabetes Association from Glastras SJ, etal.: The role of autoimmunity at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in thedevelopment of thyroid and celiac disease and microvascular complications. DiabetesCare 2005; 28(9): 2170-2175. Copyright and allrights reserved.)
Mentions: It is well known that T1D is frequently associated with other organ-specific autoimmunediseases, including autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), pernicious anemia, and idiopathicAddison’s disease (4). Table 1Table 1The prevalence of autoimmune disease complicating type 1 diabetes summarizes the prevalence of organ-specific autoimmune disease complicatingT1D in Japanese and Caucasoid patients (5). InJapanese patients with T1D, the most common coexisting organ-specific autoimmune disease isAITD (> 90%). The prevalence of anti-thyroid autoantibodies in children with T1D atdisease onset is about 20%, and anti-thyroid autoantibodies are particularly common ingirls. Furthermore, it is reported that the prevalence of anti-thyroid antibodies increaseswith increasing age and that the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies at diagnosis of T1Dpredicts the development of future thyroid disease (6). Patients with anti-thyroid antibodies are 18 times more likely to developthyroid disease than patients without anti-thyroid antibodies (7) (Fig.1Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: In a combined analysis, 94% of Japanese patients with T1D can be defined as having type 1A diabetes.Furthermore, autoantibodies to ZnT8 and IA-2 are associated with childhood-onset and acute-onset patients.Thus, it is important to develop a diagnostic strategy for patients with type 1A diabetes in consideration of the age or mode of disease onset.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diabetes and Metabolism, Nagasaki Harbor Medical Center City Hospital, Nagasaki, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by the autoimmune response against pancreatic β cells. T1D is often complicated with other autoimmune diseases, and anti-islet autoantibodies precede the clinical onset of disease. The most common coexisting organ-specific autoimmune disease in patients with T1D is autoimmune thyroid disease, and its frequency is estimated at > 90% among patients with T1D and autoimmune diseases. The prevalence of anti-thyroid antibodies in children with T1D at disease onset is about 20% and is particularly common in girls. Furthermore, patients with anti-thyroid antibodies are 18 times more likely to develop thyroid disease than patients without anti-thyroid antibodies. Therefore, for early detection of autoimmune thyroid disease in children with T1D, measurement of anti-thyroid antibodies and TSH at T1D onset and in yearly intervals after the age of 12 yr is recommended. Anti-islet autoantibodies are predictive and diagnostic markers for T1D. The most frequently detected autoantibodies in Japanese patients are GAD autoantibodies (~80%) followed by IA-2 autoantibodies (~60%), insulin autoantibodies (~55%) and ZnT8 autoantibodies (~50%). In a combined analysis, 94% of Japanese patients with T1D can be defined as having type 1A diabetes. Furthermore, autoantibodies to ZnT8 and IA-2 are associated with childhood-onset and acute-onset patients. Thus, it is important to develop a diagnostic strategy for patients with type 1A diabetes in consideration of the age or mode of disease onset.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus