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The effect of preterm birth on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in children.

Eshaghi Z, Jafari Z, Shaibanizadeh A, Jalaie S, Ghaseminejad A - Med J Islam Repub Iran (2014)

Bottom Line: No significant differences existed between groups for p13-n23 amplitude and the interaural amplitude difference ratio.The tested ear and gender did not affect the results of the test.It can be used in follow-ups of the long-term effects of preterm birth on the vestibular system.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Department of Audiology, School of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. z_eshaghi@razi.tums.ac.ir / Zahraeshaghi2011@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Preterm birth is a significant global health problem with serious short- and long-term consequences. This study examined the long term effects of preterm birth on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) among preschool-aged children.

Methods: Thirty-one children with preterm and 20 children with term birth histories aged 5.5 to 6.5 years were studied. Each child underwent VEMPs testing using a 500 Hz tone-burst stimulus with a 95 dB nHL (normal hearing level) intensity level.

Results: The mean peak latencies of the p13 and n23 waves in the very preterm group were significantly longer than for the full-term group (p≤ 0.041). There was a significant difference between very and mildly preterm children in the latency of peak p13 (p= 0.003). No significant differences existed between groups for p13-n23 amplitude and the interaural amplitude difference ratio. The tested ear and gender did not affect the results of the test.

Conclusion: Prolonged VEMPs in very preterm children may reflect neurodevelopmental impairment and incomplete maturity of the vestibulospinal tract (sacculocollic reflex pathway), especially myelination. VEMPs is a non-invasive technique for investigating the vestibular function in young children, and considered to be an appropriate tool for evaluating vestibular impairments at the low brainstem level. It can be used in follow-ups of the long-term effects of preterm birth on the vestibular system.

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Mentions: Significant differences were observed in the latency of the p13 (p= 0.002) and n23 (p= 0.041) waves between the VP group and control group. Fig. 2 shows sample responses recorded from the right ear in one VP and one normal child. A significantly prolonged p13 latency was observed in the VP group over the MP group (p= 0.003). Moreover there was no significant difference between the MP and control groups for all test parameters (p≥ 0.773).


The effect of preterm birth on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in children.

Eshaghi Z, Jafari Z, Shaibanizadeh A, Jalaie S, Ghaseminejad A - Med J Islam Repub Iran (2014)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219904&req=5

Mentions: Significant differences were observed in the latency of the p13 (p= 0.002) and n23 (p= 0.041) waves between the VP group and control group. Fig. 2 shows sample responses recorded from the right ear in one VP and one normal child. A significantly prolonged p13 latency was observed in the VP group over the MP group (p= 0.003). Moreover there was no significant difference between the MP and control groups for all test parameters (p≥ 0.773).

Bottom Line: No significant differences existed between groups for p13-n23 amplitude and the interaural amplitude difference ratio.The tested ear and gender did not affect the results of the test.It can be used in follow-ups of the long-term effects of preterm birth on the vestibular system.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Department of Audiology, School of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. z_eshaghi@razi.tums.ac.ir / Zahraeshaghi2011@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Preterm birth is a significant global health problem with serious short- and long-term consequences. This study examined the long term effects of preterm birth on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) among preschool-aged children.

Methods: Thirty-one children with preterm and 20 children with term birth histories aged 5.5 to 6.5 years were studied. Each child underwent VEMPs testing using a 500 Hz tone-burst stimulus with a 95 dB nHL (normal hearing level) intensity level.

Results: The mean peak latencies of the p13 and n23 waves in the very preterm group were significantly longer than for the full-term group (p≤ 0.041). There was a significant difference between very and mildly preterm children in the latency of peak p13 (p= 0.003). No significant differences existed between groups for p13-n23 amplitude and the interaural amplitude difference ratio. The tested ear and gender did not affect the results of the test.

Conclusion: Prolonged VEMPs in very preterm children may reflect neurodevelopmental impairment and incomplete maturity of the vestibulospinal tract (sacculocollic reflex pathway), especially myelination. VEMPs is a non-invasive technique for investigating the vestibular function in young children, and considered to be an appropriate tool for evaluating vestibular impairments at the low brainstem level. It can be used in follow-ups of the long-term effects of preterm birth on the vestibular system.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus