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Age-related cataract, cataract surgery and subsequent mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Song E, Sun H, Xu Y, Ma Y, Zhu H, Pan CW - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: We pooled the effect estimates (hazards ratios [HRs]) under a random effects model.In the meta-analysis of 8 study findings, cortical cataract was associated with higher risks of mortality (pooled HR: 1.26, 95% CI, 1.12, 1.42; P<0.001, I(2) = 29.7%).These findings indicated that changes in lens may serve as markers for ageing and systemic health in general population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lixiang Eye Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Changes in lens may reflect the status of systemic health of human beings but the supporting evidences are not well summarized yet. We aimed to determine the relationship of age-related cataract, cataract surgery and long-term mortality by pooling the results of published population-based studies.

Methods: We searched PubMed and Embase from their inception till March, 2014 for population-based studies reporting the associations of any subtypes of age-related cataract, cataract surgery with all-cause mortality. We pooled the effect estimates (hazards ratios [HRs]) under a random effects model.

Results: Totally, we identified 10 unique population-based studies including 39,659 individuals at baseline reporting the associations of any subtypes of cataract with all-cause mortality from 6 countries. The presence of any cataract including cataract surgery was significantly associated with a higher risk of death (pooled HR: 1.43, 95% CI, 1.21, 2.02; P<0.001; I(2) = 64.2%). In the meta-analysis of 9 study findings, adults with nuclear cataract were at higher risks of mortality (pooled HR: 1.55, 95% CI, 1.17, 2.05; P = 0.002; I(2) = 89.2%). In the meta-analysis of 8 study findings, cortical cataract was associated with higher risks of mortality (pooled HR: 1.26, 95% CI, 1.12, 1.42; P<0.001, I(2) = 29.7%). In the meta-analysis of 6 study findings, PSC cataract was associated with higher risks of mortality (pooled HR: 1.37, 95% CI, 1.04, 1.80; P = 0.03; I(2) = 67.3%). The association between cataract surgery and mortality was marginally non-significant by pooling 8 study findings (pooled HR: 1.27, 95% CI, 0.97, 1.66; P = 0.08; I(2)= 76.6%).

Conclusions: All subtypes of age-related cataract were associated with an increased mortality with nuclear cataract having the strongest association among the 3 cataract subtypes. However, cataract surgery was not significantly related to mortality. These findings indicated that changes in lens may serve as markers for ageing and systemic health in general population.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram showing the selection process for inclusion of studies.
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pone-0112054-g001: Flow diagram showing the selection process for inclusion of studies.

Mentions: The literature search yielded 4288 unique titles from the two electronic databases. In total, 91 articles were retrieved for full-text review, 12 of which met all the predefined inclusion criteria. However, two studies reported 2 results at different follow-up periods [2], [5], [20]–[21] and only the result with a longer follow-up period were included. Finally, 10 unique population-based studies [1]–[2],[21]–[28] were included in this meta-analysis. (Figure 1)


Age-related cataract, cataract surgery and subsequent mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Song E, Sun H, Xu Y, Ma Y, Zhu H, Pan CW - PLoS ONE (2014)

Flow diagram showing the selection process for inclusion of studies.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219834&req=5

pone-0112054-g001: Flow diagram showing the selection process for inclusion of studies.
Mentions: The literature search yielded 4288 unique titles from the two electronic databases. In total, 91 articles were retrieved for full-text review, 12 of which met all the predefined inclusion criteria. However, two studies reported 2 results at different follow-up periods [2], [5], [20]–[21] and only the result with a longer follow-up period were included. Finally, 10 unique population-based studies [1]–[2],[21]–[28] were included in this meta-analysis. (Figure 1)

Bottom Line: We pooled the effect estimates (hazards ratios [HRs]) under a random effects model.In the meta-analysis of 8 study findings, cortical cataract was associated with higher risks of mortality (pooled HR: 1.26, 95% CI, 1.12, 1.42; P<0.001, I(2) = 29.7%).These findings indicated that changes in lens may serve as markers for ageing and systemic health in general population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lixiang Eye Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Changes in lens may reflect the status of systemic health of human beings but the supporting evidences are not well summarized yet. We aimed to determine the relationship of age-related cataract, cataract surgery and long-term mortality by pooling the results of published population-based studies.

Methods: We searched PubMed and Embase from their inception till March, 2014 for population-based studies reporting the associations of any subtypes of age-related cataract, cataract surgery with all-cause mortality. We pooled the effect estimates (hazards ratios [HRs]) under a random effects model.

Results: Totally, we identified 10 unique population-based studies including 39,659 individuals at baseline reporting the associations of any subtypes of cataract with all-cause mortality from 6 countries. The presence of any cataract including cataract surgery was significantly associated with a higher risk of death (pooled HR: 1.43, 95% CI, 1.21, 2.02; P<0.001; I(2) = 64.2%). In the meta-analysis of 9 study findings, adults with nuclear cataract were at higher risks of mortality (pooled HR: 1.55, 95% CI, 1.17, 2.05; P = 0.002; I(2) = 89.2%). In the meta-analysis of 8 study findings, cortical cataract was associated with higher risks of mortality (pooled HR: 1.26, 95% CI, 1.12, 1.42; P<0.001, I(2) = 29.7%). In the meta-analysis of 6 study findings, PSC cataract was associated with higher risks of mortality (pooled HR: 1.37, 95% CI, 1.04, 1.80; P = 0.03; I(2) = 67.3%). The association between cataract surgery and mortality was marginally non-significant by pooling 8 study findings (pooled HR: 1.27, 95% CI, 0.97, 1.66; P = 0.08; I(2)= 76.6%).

Conclusions: All subtypes of age-related cataract were associated with an increased mortality with nuclear cataract having the strongest association among the 3 cataract subtypes. However, cataract surgery was not significantly related to mortality. These findings indicated that changes in lens may serve as markers for ageing and systemic health in general population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus