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Interplay of agency and ownership: the intentional binding and rubber hand illusion paradigm combined.

Braun N, Thorne JD, Hildebrandt H, Debener S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Implicit and explicit agency measures were not significantly correlated.Finally, intentional binding tended to be stronger in self-generated than observed voluntary actions.Results provide further evidence for a partial double dissociation between SoA and SoO, empirically distinct agency levels, and moderate intentional binding differences between self-generated and observed voluntary actions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Neuropsychology Lab, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The sense of agency (SoA) refers to the phenomenal experience of initiating and controlling an action, whereas the sense of ownership (SoO) describes the feeling of myness an agent experiences towards his or her own body parts. SoA has been investigated with intentional binding paradigms, and the sense of ownership (SoO) with the rubber-hand illusion (RHI). We investigated the relationship between SoA and SoO by incorporating intentional binding into the RHI. Explicit and implicit measures of agency (SoA-questionnaire, intentional binding) and ownership (SoO-questionnaire, proprioceptive drift) were used. Artificial hand position (congruent/incongruent) and mode of agent (self-agent/other-agent) were systematically varied. Reported SoO varied mainly with position (higher in congruent conditions), but also with agent (higher in self-agent conditions). Reported SoA was modulated by agent (higher in self-agent conditions), and moderately by position (higher in congruent conditions). Implicit and explicit agency measures were not significantly correlated. Finally, intentional binding tended to be stronger in self-generated than observed voluntary actions. Results provide further evidence for a partial double dissociation between SoA and SoO, empirically distinct agency levels, and moderate intentional binding differences between self-generated and observed voluntary actions.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental design, frontal view.Participants placed their right hand on the lower plate, whereas the artificial hand was placed directly above on the upper plate. The artificial hand's index finger and the lower button were connected via a string. Hence, whenever either the lower button was pressed by the participant (self-agency) or the ring was moved up or down by the experimenter (other-agency), the index finger of the artificial hand moved up or down accordingly. Lateral view. Illustrated is the measurement of the proprioceptive drift. Participants closed their eyes, stretched out their left arm and indicated with their left index finger the perceived height of their right hand. The height of the participant's left index finger was then marked by the experimenter onto the scale paper attached to each side of the table.
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pone-0111967-g001: Experimental design, frontal view.Participants placed their right hand on the lower plate, whereas the artificial hand was placed directly above on the upper plate. The artificial hand's index finger and the lower button were connected via a string. Hence, whenever either the lower button was pressed by the participant (self-agency) or the ring was moved up or down by the experimenter (other-agency), the index finger of the artificial hand moved up or down accordingly. Lateral view. Illustrated is the measurement of the proprioceptive drift. Participants closed their eyes, stretched out their left arm and indicated with their left index finger the perceived height of their right hand. The height of the participant's left index finger was then marked by the experimenter onto the scale paper attached to each side of the table.

Mentions: The experimental set-up is depicted in Fig. 1. Participants sat in front of a rectangular table (50×60 cm) consisting of a tabletop and a lower shelf. The vertical distance between the tabletop and lower shelf was 7.5 cm. One button press device was placed in the middle of the tabletop and another one directly below on the lower plate. The upper button was connected to a notebook so that button-presses could be recorded. Presentation software (version 14.9; Neurobehavioral Systems Inc., Albany, USA) was used for stimulus presentation. A life-sized plaster cast of a female human hand (18 cm in length, from the tip of the middle finger to the end of the wrist) was covered with a thin-gauge garden glove and served as our artificial hand. The hand was placed in the middle of the table top, parallel to the short sides. The artificial index finger was equipped with a rebounding joint and fixed to the upper response button, such that index finger movements could be realistically mimicked. A small string was attached to the lower side of the artificial finger's tip (invisibly covered under the glove) and was threaded through a hole in the tabletop to the area below, where it was split into two strands. The two strands were connected to the outer edges of the lower button, such that the participant's index finger could be comfortably placed on the lower key without touching the string. Attached to the string above the lower key was a small ring used by the experimenter in the other-agent conditions to move the string up and down. Hence, whenever either the lower button or the ring was moved up or down, the index finger of the artificial hand moved up or down accordingly.


Interplay of agency and ownership: the intentional binding and rubber hand illusion paradigm combined.

Braun N, Thorne JD, Hildebrandt H, Debener S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Experimental design, frontal view.Participants placed their right hand on the lower plate, whereas the artificial hand was placed directly above on the upper plate. The artificial hand's index finger and the lower button were connected via a string. Hence, whenever either the lower button was pressed by the participant (self-agency) or the ring was moved up or down by the experimenter (other-agency), the index finger of the artificial hand moved up or down accordingly. Lateral view. Illustrated is the measurement of the proprioceptive drift. Participants closed their eyes, stretched out their left arm and indicated with their left index finger the perceived height of their right hand. The height of the participant's left index finger was then marked by the experimenter onto the scale paper attached to each side of the table.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219820&req=5

pone-0111967-g001: Experimental design, frontal view.Participants placed their right hand on the lower plate, whereas the artificial hand was placed directly above on the upper plate. The artificial hand's index finger and the lower button were connected via a string. Hence, whenever either the lower button was pressed by the participant (self-agency) or the ring was moved up or down by the experimenter (other-agency), the index finger of the artificial hand moved up or down accordingly. Lateral view. Illustrated is the measurement of the proprioceptive drift. Participants closed their eyes, stretched out their left arm and indicated with their left index finger the perceived height of their right hand. The height of the participant's left index finger was then marked by the experimenter onto the scale paper attached to each side of the table.
Mentions: The experimental set-up is depicted in Fig. 1. Participants sat in front of a rectangular table (50×60 cm) consisting of a tabletop and a lower shelf. The vertical distance between the tabletop and lower shelf was 7.5 cm. One button press device was placed in the middle of the tabletop and another one directly below on the lower plate. The upper button was connected to a notebook so that button-presses could be recorded. Presentation software (version 14.9; Neurobehavioral Systems Inc., Albany, USA) was used for stimulus presentation. A life-sized plaster cast of a female human hand (18 cm in length, from the tip of the middle finger to the end of the wrist) was covered with a thin-gauge garden glove and served as our artificial hand. The hand was placed in the middle of the table top, parallel to the short sides. The artificial index finger was equipped with a rebounding joint and fixed to the upper response button, such that index finger movements could be realistically mimicked. A small string was attached to the lower side of the artificial finger's tip (invisibly covered under the glove) and was threaded through a hole in the tabletop to the area below, where it was split into two strands. The two strands were connected to the outer edges of the lower button, such that the participant's index finger could be comfortably placed on the lower key without touching the string. Attached to the string above the lower key was a small ring used by the experimenter in the other-agent conditions to move the string up and down. Hence, whenever either the lower button or the ring was moved up or down, the index finger of the artificial hand moved up or down accordingly.

Bottom Line: Implicit and explicit agency measures were not significantly correlated.Finally, intentional binding tended to be stronger in self-generated than observed voluntary actions.Results provide further evidence for a partial double dissociation between SoA and SoO, empirically distinct agency levels, and moderate intentional binding differences between self-generated and observed voluntary actions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Neuropsychology Lab, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The sense of agency (SoA) refers to the phenomenal experience of initiating and controlling an action, whereas the sense of ownership (SoO) describes the feeling of myness an agent experiences towards his or her own body parts. SoA has been investigated with intentional binding paradigms, and the sense of ownership (SoO) with the rubber-hand illusion (RHI). We investigated the relationship between SoA and SoO by incorporating intentional binding into the RHI. Explicit and implicit measures of agency (SoA-questionnaire, intentional binding) and ownership (SoO-questionnaire, proprioceptive drift) were used. Artificial hand position (congruent/incongruent) and mode of agent (self-agent/other-agent) were systematically varied. Reported SoO varied mainly with position (higher in congruent conditions), but also with agent (higher in self-agent conditions). Reported SoA was modulated by agent (higher in self-agent conditions), and moderately by position (higher in congruent conditions). Implicit and explicit agency measures were not significantly correlated. Finally, intentional binding tended to be stronger in self-generated than observed voluntary actions. Results provide further evidence for a partial double dissociation between SoA and SoO, empirically distinct agency levels, and moderate intentional binding differences between self-generated and observed voluntary actions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus