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Age-related association of refractive error with intraocular pressure in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Choi JA, Han K, Park YM, Park CK - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Myopia and high myopia were more prevalent in the young- (70.8% and 16.1%, respectively), compared to the middle- (44.6% and 10.9%) and old- (8.9% and 2.2%) age groups.Univariate analysis in the total population showed that higher IOP was associated with myopic refractive error, the female gender, higher body mass index (BMI), diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia (all P<0.05).In multiple linear regression analysis, similar significant relationships between the refractive error and IOP were found in the young- and middle-age groups (beta =  -0.08 and -0.12; P = 0.002 and <0.001 for young- and middle-age group, respectively), but not in the old-age group (beta = 0.03; P = 0.728), after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, region of habitation, diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: St. Vincent's Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: To investigate the distribution of intraocular pressure (IOP) and refractive errors according to age group in a representative sample of non-glaucomatous Korean adults.

Methods: A total of 7,277 adults (≥ 19 years) who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) from 2008 to 2011 underwent ophthalmic examination were divided into three groups according to age: the young- (19-39 years), middle- (40-59 years), and old- (≥ 60 years) age groups. Simple and multiple regression analyses between IOP and various parameters (including the refractive error) were conducted.

Results: The mean IOP of the total population was 14.0 ± 0.1 mmHg [young: 13.9 ± 0.1 mmHg; middle: 14.1 ± 0.1 mmHg; old: 13.8 ± 0.2 mmHg (P for trend = 0.085)]. Myopia and high myopia were more prevalent in the young- (70.8% and 16.1%, respectively), compared to the middle- (44.6% and 10.9%) and old- (8.9% and 2.2%) age groups. Univariate analysis in the total population showed that higher IOP was associated with myopic refractive error, the female gender, higher body mass index (BMI), diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia (all P<0.05). In the young- and middle-age groups, higher IOP was associated with myopic refractive error, the female gender, higher BMI, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes (all P<0.05). In the old-age group, the association between IOP and refractive error was not significant (P = 0.828). In multiple linear regression analysis, similar significant relationships between the refractive error and IOP were found in the young- and middle-age groups (beta =  -0.08 and -0.12; P = 0.002 and <0.001 for young- and middle-age group, respectively), but not in the old-age group (beta = 0.03; P = 0.728), after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, region of habitation, diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia.

Conclusions: Myopic refractive error was an independent predictor of higher IOP in non- glaucomatous eyes, and the association between refractive error and IOP differed according to age.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of myopia (−0.5 D or greater myopia) and high myopia (−6.0 D or greater myopia) in different age groups.
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pone-0111879-g001: Prevalence of myopia (−0.5 D or greater myopia) and high myopia (−6.0 D or greater myopia) in different age groups.

Mentions: The prevalence of myopia and high myopia according to age groups are shown in Figure 1. The prevalence of myopia and high myopia was dramatically higher in the young- (70.8% and 16.1%, respectively), compared to the middle- (44.6% and 10.9%) and old-age groups (8.9% and 2.2%). The mean IOP of the sample was 14.0±0.1 mmHg [(13.9±0.1 mmHg in the young-, 14.1±0.1 mmHg in the middle-, and 13.8±0.2 mmHg in the old-age group (P for trend = 0.085)].


Age-related association of refractive error with intraocular pressure in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Choi JA, Han K, Park YM, Park CK - PLoS ONE (2014)

Prevalence of myopia (−0.5 D or greater myopia) and high myopia (−6.0 D or greater myopia) in different age groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219793&req=5

pone-0111879-g001: Prevalence of myopia (−0.5 D or greater myopia) and high myopia (−6.0 D or greater myopia) in different age groups.
Mentions: The prevalence of myopia and high myopia according to age groups are shown in Figure 1. The prevalence of myopia and high myopia was dramatically higher in the young- (70.8% and 16.1%, respectively), compared to the middle- (44.6% and 10.9%) and old-age groups (8.9% and 2.2%). The mean IOP of the sample was 14.0±0.1 mmHg [(13.9±0.1 mmHg in the young-, 14.1±0.1 mmHg in the middle-, and 13.8±0.2 mmHg in the old-age group (P for trend = 0.085)].

Bottom Line: Myopia and high myopia were more prevalent in the young- (70.8% and 16.1%, respectively), compared to the middle- (44.6% and 10.9%) and old- (8.9% and 2.2%) age groups.Univariate analysis in the total population showed that higher IOP was associated with myopic refractive error, the female gender, higher body mass index (BMI), diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia (all P<0.05).In multiple linear regression analysis, similar significant relationships between the refractive error and IOP were found in the young- and middle-age groups (beta =  -0.08 and -0.12; P = 0.002 and <0.001 for young- and middle-age group, respectively), but not in the old-age group (beta = 0.03; P = 0.728), after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, region of habitation, diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: St. Vincent's Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: To investigate the distribution of intraocular pressure (IOP) and refractive errors according to age group in a representative sample of non-glaucomatous Korean adults.

Methods: A total of 7,277 adults (≥ 19 years) who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) from 2008 to 2011 underwent ophthalmic examination were divided into three groups according to age: the young- (19-39 years), middle- (40-59 years), and old- (≥ 60 years) age groups. Simple and multiple regression analyses between IOP and various parameters (including the refractive error) were conducted.

Results: The mean IOP of the total population was 14.0 ± 0.1 mmHg [young: 13.9 ± 0.1 mmHg; middle: 14.1 ± 0.1 mmHg; old: 13.8 ± 0.2 mmHg (P for trend = 0.085)]. Myopia and high myopia were more prevalent in the young- (70.8% and 16.1%, respectively), compared to the middle- (44.6% and 10.9%) and old- (8.9% and 2.2%) age groups. Univariate analysis in the total population showed that higher IOP was associated with myopic refractive error, the female gender, higher body mass index (BMI), diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia (all P<0.05). In the young- and middle-age groups, higher IOP was associated with myopic refractive error, the female gender, higher BMI, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes (all P<0.05). In the old-age group, the association between IOP and refractive error was not significant (P = 0.828). In multiple linear regression analysis, similar significant relationships between the refractive error and IOP were found in the young- and middle-age groups (beta =  -0.08 and -0.12; P = 0.002 and <0.001 for young- and middle-age group, respectively), but not in the old-age group (beta = 0.03; P = 0.728), after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, region of habitation, diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia.

Conclusions: Myopic refractive error was an independent predictor of higher IOP in non- glaucomatous eyes, and the association between refractive error and IOP differed according to age.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus