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Trajectories of metabolic syndrome development in young adults.

Poon VT, Kuk JL, Ardern CI - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study (n = 3 804; 18-30 y) was obtained by limited access application from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and used for this analysis.After adjusting for covariates, individuals in the At-Risk groups (Low, Moderate and High MetS) were more likely to be of black ethnicity (1.37, 1.14-1.66), have a family history of cardiovascular disease (1.61, 1.31-1.97) and history of dieting (1.69, 1.20-2.39) when compared to the No Risk trajectory group (No MetS).Conversely, increasing baseline education (0.76, 0.65-0.89) and aerobic fitness (0.55, 0.47-0.64) was inversely associated with At-Risk group membership.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of metabolic aberrations that collectively increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Greater understanding of MetS developments may provide insight into targeted prevention strategies for individuals at greatest risk. The purpose of this study was to i) identify distinct patterns of longitudinal MetS development and; ii) develop a character profile that differentiates groups by level of MetS risk.

Methods and results: Data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study (n = 3 804; 18-30 y) was obtained by limited access application from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and used for this analysis. MetS, as defined by the Harmonized criteria, was assessed over a 20 year follow-up period. Group-level trajectory analysis identified 4 distinct groups with varying rates of component development [No (23.8% of sample); Low (33.5%); Moderate (35.3%); and High MetS (7.4%)]. After adjusting for covariates, individuals in the At-Risk groups (Low, Moderate and High MetS) were more likely to be of black ethnicity (1.37, 1.14-1.66), have a family history of cardiovascular disease (1.61, 1.31-1.97) and history of dieting (1.69, 1.20-2.39) when compared to the No Risk trajectory group (No MetS). Conversely, increasing baseline education (0.76, 0.65-0.89) and aerobic fitness (0.55, 0.47-0.64) was inversely associated with At-Risk group membership.

Conclusions: Results suggest distinct profiles of MetS development that can be identified by baseline risk factors. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical implication of intermediate MetS development groups with respect to overall cardiometabolic risk.

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Evolution of individual MetS Components based on trajectory groups (No, Low, Mod and High).
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pone-0111647-g004: Evolution of individual MetS Components based on trajectory groups (No, Low, Mod and High).

Mentions: Baseline characteristics between each of the trajectory groups are presented in Table 1. Compared to the No MetS group, High MetS group members were more likely to be non-drinkers, black ethnicity, obese, consume fast food more than twice a week, and have lower PA, aerobic fitness level, and family history of CHD. Differences in biophysical characteristics were also observed (Table 1 and Figure 4). Most notably, the mean WC was 13.6 cm larger amongst males and 19.7 cm amongst females in the High MetS group than the No MetS group. Similarly, compared to the No MetS group, both TG and HDL levels were 0.5 mM higher in the High MetS group.


Trajectories of metabolic syndrome development in young adults.

Poon VT, Kuk JL, Ardern CI - PLoS ONE (2014)

Evolution of individual MetS Components based on trajectory groups (No, Low, Mod and High).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219745&req=5

pone-0111647-g004: Evolution of individual MetS Components based on trajectory groups (No, Low, Mod and High).
Mentions: Baseline characteristics between each of the trajectory groups are presented in Table 1. Compared to the No MetS group, High MetS group members were more likely to be non-drinkers, black ethnicity, obese, consume fast food more than twice a week, and have lower PA, aerobic fitness level, and family history of CHD. Differences in biophysical characteristics were also observed (Table 1 and Figure 4). Most notably, the mean WC was 13.6 cm larger amongst males and 19.7 cm amongst females in the High MetS group than the No MetS group. Similarly, compared to the No MetS group, both TG and HDL levels were 0.5 mM higher in the High MetS group.

Bottom Line: Data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study (n = 3 804; 18-30 y) was obtained by limited access application from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and used for this analysis.After adjusting for covariates, individuals in the At-Risk groups (Low, Moderate and High MetS) were more likely to be of black ethnicity (1.37, 1.14-1.66), have a family history of cardiovascular disease (1.61, 1.31-1.97) and history of dieting (1.69, 1.20-2.39) when compared to the No Risk trajectory group (No MetS).Conversely, increasing baseline education (0.76, 0.65-0.89) and aerobic fitness (0.55, 0.47-0.64) was inversely associated with At-Risk group membership.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of metabolic aberrations that collectively increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Greater understanding of MetS developments may provide insight into targeted prevention strategies for individuals at greatest risk. The purpose of this study was to i) identify distinct patterns of longitudinal MetS development and; ii) develop a character profile that differentiates groups by level of MetS risk.

Methods and results: Data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study (n = 3 804; 18-30 y) was obtained by limited access application from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and used for this analysis. MetS, as defined by the Harmonized criteria, was assessed over a 20 year follow-up period. Group-level trajectory analysis identified 4 distinct groups with varying rates of component development [No (23.8% of sample); Low (33.5%); Moderate (35.3%); and High MetS (7.4%)]. After adjusting for covariates, individuals in the At-Risk groups (Low, Moderate and High MetS) were more likely to be of black ethnicity (1.37, 1.14-1.66), have a family history of cardiovascular disease (1.61, 1.31-1.97) and history of dieting (1.69, 1.20-2.39) when compared to the No Risk trajectory group (No MetS). Conversely, increasing baseline education (0.76, 0.65-0.89) and aerobic fitness (0.55, 0.47-0.64) was inversely associated with At-Risk group membership.

Conclusions: Results suggest distinct profiles of MetS development that can be identified by baseline risk factors. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical implication of intermediate MetS development groups with respect to overall cardiometabolic risk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus