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Gender disparities in latent tuberculosis infection in high-risk individuals: a cross-sectional study.

Ting WY, Huang SF, Lee MC, Lin YY, Lee YC, Feng JY, Su WJ - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The proportion of LTBI was significantly higher in males than in females (32.6% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.010).In multivariate analysis, independent clinical factors associated with LTBI were age (p = 0.014), smoking (p = 0.048), and fibro-calcified lesions on chest radiogram (p = 0.009).In conclusion, although the proportion of LTBI is higher in men, there is no significant disparity in terms of sex in LTBI among high-risk individuals after adjusting for age, smoking status, and other clinical factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chest Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.

ABSTRACT
Male predominance in active tuberculosis (TB) is widely-reported globally. Gender inequalities in socio-cultural status are frequently regarded as contributing factors for disparities in sex in active TB. The disparities of sex in the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) are less frequently investigated and deserve clarification. In this cross-sectional study conducted in a TB endemic area, we enrolled patients at high-risk for LTBI and progression from LTBI to active TB from 2011 to 2012. Diagnosis of LTBI was made by QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT). Differences in sex in terms of prevalence of LTBI and clinical predictors for LTBI were investigated. Associations among age, smoking status, and sex disparities in LTBI were also analyzed. A total of 1018 high-risk individuals with definite QFT-GIT results were included for analysis, including 534 males and 484 females. The proportion of LTBI was significantly higher in males than in females (32.6% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.010). Differences in the proportion of LTBI between sexes were most prominent in older patients (age ≥ 55 years). In multivariate analysis, independent clinical factors associated with LTBI were age (p = 0.014), smoking (p = 0.048), and fibro-calcified lesions on chest radiogram (p = 0.009). Male sex was not an independent factor for LTBI (p = 0.88). When stratifying patients according to the smoking status, the proportion of LTBI remained comparable between sexes among smokers and non-smokers. In conclusion, although the proportion of LTBI is higher in men, there is no significant disparity in terms of sex in LTBI among high-risk individuals after adjusting for age, smoking status, and other clinical factors.

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Proportions of latent TB infection between sexes in various age groups.
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pone-0110104-g002: Proportions of latent TB infection between sexes in various age groups.

Mentions: Because older age was associated with LTBI in both males and females, the proportion of LTBI between sexes in various age groups was analyzed. The proportion of LTBI in males dramatically increased with increasing age, especially in those older than 55 years old (Figure 2). The proportion of LTBI in females also increased with increasing age but the differences were less remarkable. Sex disparities in LTBI were most prominent in patients with age ranged of 55–84 years. The proportion of LTBI declined in the extremely old population, i.e. >85 years old, in both sexes.


Gender disparities in latent tuberculosis infection in high-risk individuals: a cross-sectional study.

Ting WY, Huang SF, Lee MC, Lin YY, Lee YC, Feng JY, Su WJ - PLoS ONE (2014)

Proportions of latent TB infection between sexes in various age groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219689&req=5

pone-0110104-g002: Proportions of latent TB infection between sexes in various age groups.
Mentions: Because older age was associated with LTBI in both males and females, the proportion of LTBI between sexes in various age groups was analyzed. The proportion of LTBI in males dramatically increased with increasing age, especially in those older than 55 years old (Figure 2). The proportion of LTBI in females also increased with increasing age but the differences were less remarkable. Sex disparities in LTBI were most prominent in patients with age ranged of 55–84 years. The proportion of LTBI declined in the extremely old population, i.e. >85 years old, in both sexes.

Bottom Line: The proportion of LTBI was significantly higher in males than in females (32.6% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.010).In multivariate analysis, independent clinical factors associated with LTBI were age (p = 0.014), smoking (p = 0.048), and fibro-calcified lesions on chest radiogram (p = 0.009).In conclusion, although the proportion of LTBI is higher in men, there is no significant disparity in terms of sex in LTBI among high-risk individuals after adjusting for age, smoking status, and other clinical factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chest Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.

ABSTRACT
Male predominance in active tuberculosis (TB) is widely-reported globally. Gender inequalities in socio-cultural status are frequently regarded as contributing factors for disparities in sex in active TB. The disparities of sex in the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) are less frequently investigated and deserve clarification. In this cross-sectional study conducted in a TB endemic area, we enrolled patients at high-risk for LTBI and progression from LTBI to active TB from 2011 to 2012. Diagnosis of LTBI was made by QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT). Differences in sex in terms of prevalence of LTBI and clinical predictors for LTBI were investigated. Associations among age, smoking status, and sex disparities in LTBI were also analyzed. A total of 1018 high-risk individuals with definite QFT-GIT results were included for analysis, including 534 males and 484 females. The proportion of LTBI was significantly higher in males than in females (32.6% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.010). Differences in the proportion of LTBI between sexes were most prominent in older patients (age ≥ 55 years). In multivariate analysis, independent clinical factors associated with LTBI were age (p = 0.014), smoking (p = 0.048), and fibro-calcified lesions on chest radiogram (p = 0.009). Male sex was not an independent factor for LTBI (p = 0.88). When stratifying patients according to the smoking status, the proportion of LTBI remained comparable between sexes among smokers and non-smokers. In conclusion, although the proportion of LTBI is higher in men, there is no significant disparity in terms of sex in LTBI among high-risk individuals after adjusting for age, smoking status, and other clinical factors.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus