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Intrinsic electrical properties of mammalian neurons and CNS function: a historical perspective.

Llinás RR - Front Cell Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons.It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function.The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, New York University School of Medicine New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons. It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function. The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings in three functional states. (A) Magnetic recording demonstrating gamma band activity following a sensory stimulus in awake subject. (B) Recordings from same subject during deep, dreamless sleep. (C) Gamma band activity while dreaming. (D) Instrument noise in the absence of a subject. (E) Localization of gamma band activity in an awake subject note frontal and parietal and temporal association lobe activity. (F) Localization of gamma band activity recorded when the subject was dreaming. Note the lack of frontal lobe activity and the powerful activation of the temporal pole. (Llinás and Ribary, 1993 and unpublished observations.).
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Figure 15: Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings in three functional states. (A) Magnetic recording demonstrating gamma band activity following a sensory stimulus in awake subject. (B) Recordings from same subject during deep, dreamless sleep. (C) Gamma band activity while dreaming. (D) Instrument noise in the absence of a subject. (E) Localization of gamma band activity in an awake subject note frontal and parietal and temporal association lobe activity. (F) Localization of gamma band activity recorded when the subject was dreaming. Note the lack of frontal lobe activity and the powerful activation of the temporal pole. (Llinás and Ribary, 1993 and unpublished observations.).

Mentions: The MEG recordings shown in Figure 15 suggest that mostly somatosensory and visual auditory association cortices are active as well as the anterior temporal pole (amygdala) are the main players during dreaming while the frontal lobe remains only sparsely active (Figure 15F). Similar findings have been reported using MEG by Ioannides et al. (2004).


Intrinsic electrical properties of mammalian neurons and CNS function: a historical perspective.

Llinás RR - Front Cell Neurosci (2014)

Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings in three functional states. (A) Magnetic recording demonstrating gamma band activity following a sensory stimulus in awake subject. (B) Recordings from same subject during deep, dreamless sleep. (C) Gamma band activity while dreaming. (D) Instrument noise in the absence of a subject. (E) Localization of gamma band activity in an awake subject note frontal and parietal and temporal association lobe activity. (F) Localization of gamma band activity recorded when the subject was dreaming. Note the lack of frontal lobe activity and the powerful activation of the temporal pole. (Llinás and Ribary, 1993 and unpublished observations.).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219458&req=5

Figure 15: Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings in three functional states. (A) Magnetic recording demonstrating gamma band activity following a sensory stimulus in awake subject. (B) Recordings from same subject during deep, dreamless sleep. (C) Gamma band activity while dreaming. (D) Instrument noise in the absence of a subject. (E) Localization of gamma band activity in an awake subject note frontal and parietal and temporal association lobe activity. (F) Localization of gamma band activity recorded when the subject was dreaming. Note the lack of frontal lobe activity and the powerful activation of the temporal pole. (Llinás and Ribary, 1993 and unpublished observations.).
Mentions: The MEG recordings shown in Figure 15 suggest that mostly somatosensory and visual auditory association cortices are active as well as the anterior temporal pole (amygdala) are the main players during dreaming while the frontal lobe remains only sparsely active (Figure 15F). Similar findings have been reported using MEG by Ioannides et al. (2004).

Bottom Line: This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons.It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function.The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, New York University School of Medicine New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons. It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function. The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus