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How the cerebellum may monitor sensory information for spatial representation.

Rondi-Reig L, Paradis AL, Lefort JM, Babayan BM, Tobin C - Front Syst Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: We propose here that this structure is involved in maintaining a sense of direction and location during self-motion by monitoring sensory information and interacting with navigation circuits to update the mental representation of space.This review highlights that the cerebellum is adequately wired to combine the diversity of sensory signals to be monitored during self-motion and fuel the navigation circuits.The direct anatomical projections of the cerebellum toward the head-direction cell system and the parietal cortex make those structures possible relays of the cerebellum influence on the hippocampal spatial map.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 8246/UM 119, Neuroscience Paris Seine, Cerebellum, Navigation and Memory Team Paris, France ; Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale 1130, Neuroscience Paris Seine, Cerebellum, Navigation and Memory Team Paris, France ; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 8246, Neuroscience Paris Seine, Cerebellum, Navigation and Memory Team Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
The cerebellum has already been shown to participate in the navigation function. We propose here that this structure is involved in maintaining a sense of direction and location during self-motion by monitoring sensory information and interacting with navigation circuits to update the mental representation of space. To better understand the processing performed by the cerebellum in the navigation function, we have reviewed: the anatomical pathways that convey self-motion information to the cerebellum; the computational algorithm(s) thought to be performed by the cerebellum from these multi-source inputs; the cerebellar outputs directed toward navigation circuits and the influence of self-motion information on space-modulated cells receiving cerebellar outputs. This review highlights that the cerebellum is adequately wired to combine the diversity of sensory signals to be monitored during self-motion and fuel the navigation circuits. The direct anatomical projections of the cerebellum toward the head-direction cell system and the parietal cortex make those structures possible relays of the cerebellum influence on the hippocampal spatial map. We describe computational models of the cerebellar function showing that the cerebellum can filter out the components of the sensory signals that are predictable, and provides a novelty output. We finally speculate that this novelty output is taken into account by the navigation structures, which implement an update over time of position and stabilize perception during navigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cerebellar lobules. Dorsal view of the rat cerebellum. Lobules in the vermis are numbered according to Larsell's schema (Larsell, 1952). The lobules discussed in the review are highlighted in black. The flocculus and paraflocculus correspond to the hemispheric part of the flocculo-nodular lobe whereas lobules IX and X refer to its vermal part. Similarly Crus I and II are hemispheric regions in the posterior lobe whereas lobule VII is the corresponding vermal lobule. ParaFL, paraflocculus; FL, flocculus; PML, paramedian lobe; COP, copula pyramidis.
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Figure 1: Cerebellar lobules. Dorsal view of the rat cerebellum. Lobules in the vermis are numbered according to Larsell's schema (Larsell, 1952). The lobules discussed in the review are highlighted in black. The flocculus and paraflocculus correspond to the hemispheric part of the flocculo-nodular lobe whereas lobules IX and X refer to its vermal part. Similarly Crus I and II are hemispheric regions in the posterior lobe whereas lobule VII is the corresponding vermal lobule. ParaFL, paraflocculus; FL, flocculus; PML, paramedian lobe; COP, copula pyramidis.

Mentions: In the following we briefly detail anatomical projections of visuo-vestibular and neck proprioception signals which are well documented in terms of pathway and computational combination in optokinetic and vestibulo-ocular reflexes. We also describe whisker signal afferences, the processing of which is usually considered independently from that of visual and vestibular signals. We will question whether a convergence may exist between those signals within the context of navigation, and whether the efference copy signal, which targets the cerebellum and circuits engaged in self motion information process, may also be integrated with sensory signals in the cerebellum. The cerebro-cerebellar pathway which transmits already processed information, in particular from the sensory and associative cerebral cortices (Morissette and Bower, 1996) will not be described here. We will focus our description on the inputs to the vestibulocerebellum lobules IX, X (Figure 1), to the flocculus and paraflocculus, as well as the posterior lobules (VII, Crus I, Crus II) of the cerebellar cortex, which are often associated with the involvement of the cerebellum in cognitive functions (see Buckner, 2013 for a review). Figures 2, 3 illustrate the anatomical projections of these sensory inputs to the cerebellar cortex in rodents and rabbits.


How the cerebellum may monitor sensory information for spatial representation.

Rondi-Reig L, Paradis AL, Lefort JM, Babayan BM, Tobin C - Front Syst Neurosci (2014)

Cerebellar lobules. Dorsal view of the rat cerebellum. Lobules in the vermis are numbered according to Larsell's schema (Larsell, 1952). The lobules discussed in the review are highlighted in black. The flocculus and paraflocculus correspond to the hemispheric part of the flocculo-nodular lobe whereas lobules IX and X refer to its vermal part. Similarly Crus I and II are hemispheric regions in the posterior lobe whereas lobule VII is the corresponding vermal lobule. ParaFL, paraflocculus; FL, flocculus; PML, paramedian lobe; COP, copula pyramidis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219422&req=5

Figure 1: Cerebellar lobules. Dorsal view of the rat cerebellum. Lobules in the vermis are numbered according to Larsell's schema (Larsell, 1952). The lobules discussed in the review are highlighted in black. The flocculus and paraflocculus correspond to the hemispheric part of the flocculo-nodular lobe whereas lobules IX and X refer to its vermal part. Similarly Crus I and II are hemispheric regions in the posterior lobe whereas lobule VII is the corresponding vermal lobule. ParaFL, paraflocculus; FL, flocculus; PML, paramedian lobe; COP, copula pyramidis.
Mentions: In the following we briefly detail anatomical projections of visuo-vestibular and neck proprioception signals which are well documented in terms of pathway and computational combination in optokinetic and vestibulo-ocular reflexes. We also describe whisker signal afferences, the processing of which is usually considered independently from that of visual and vestibular signals. We will question whether a convergence may exist between those signals within the context of navigation, and whether the efference copy signal, which targets the cerebellum and circuits engaged in self motion information process, may also be integrated with sensory signals in the cerebellum. The cerebro-cerebellar pathway which transmits already processed information, in particular from the sensory and associative cerebral cortices (Morissette and Bower, 1996) will not be described here. We will focus our description on the inputs to the vestibulocerebellum lobules IX, X (Figure 1), to the flocculus and paraflocculus, as well as the posterior lobules (VII, Crus I, Crus II) of the cerebellar cortex, which are often associated with the involvement of the cerebellum in cognitive functions (see Buckner, 2013 for a review). Figures 2, 3 illustrate the anatomical projections of these sensory inputs to the cerebellar cortex in rodents and rabbits.

Bottom Line: We propose here that this structure is involved in maintaining a sense of direction and location during self-motion by monitoring sensory information and interacting with navigation circuits to update the mental representation of space.This review highlights that the cerebellum is adequately wired to combine the diversity of sensory signals to be monitored during self-motion and fuel the navigation circuits.The direct anatomical projections of the cerebellum toward the head-direction cell system and the parietal cortex make those structures possible relays of the cerebellum influence on the hippocampal spatial map.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 8246/UM 119, Neuroscience Paris Seine, Cerebellum, Navigation and Memory Team Paris, France ; Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale 1130, Neuroscience Paris Seine, Cerebellum, Navigation and Memory Team Paris, France ; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 8246, Neuroscience Paris Seine, Cerebellum, Navigation and Memory Team Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
The cerebellum has already been shown to participate in the navigation function. We propose here that this structure is involved in maintaining a sense of direction and location during self-motion by monitoring sensory information and interacting with navigation circuits to update the mental representation of space. To better understand the processing performed by the cerebellum in the navigation function, we have reviewed: the anatomical pathways that convey self-motion information to the cerebellum; the computational algorithm(s) thought to be performed by the cerebellum from these multi-source inputs; the cerebellar outputs directed toward navigation circuits and the influence of self-motion information on space-modulated cells receiving cerebellar outputs. This review highlights that the cerebellum is adequately wired to combine the diversity of sensory signals to be monitored during self-motion and fuel the navigation circuits. The direct anatomical projections of the cerebellum toward the head-direction cell system and the parietal cortex make those structures possible relays of the cerebellum influence on the hippocampal spatial map. We describe computational models of the cerebellar function showing that the cerebellum can filter out the components of the sensory signals that are predictable, and provides a novelty output. We finally speculate that this novelty output is taken into account by the navigation structures, which implement an update over time of position and stabilize perception during navigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus