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Patient perspective on the management of atrial fibrillation in five European countries.

Bakhai A, Sandberg A, Mittendorf T, Greiner W, Oberdiek AM, Berto P, Franczok E, Lobban T, Zamorano JL - BMC Cardiovasc Disord (2013)

Bottom Line: Most respondents were satisfied with their treatment for AF over the previous 12 months, with 85.5% (n = 1289) rating their care as good or better.In the context of Europe-wide guidelines for management of AF, most patients with AF were satisfied with their care, but for a greater proportion of patients, some aspects are unsatisfactory.Patient-centred surveys, such as the EUPS-AF, are crucial for understanding the factors that contribute to patient satisfaction and compliance with long-term treatment for chronic conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust, The Ridgeway, Enfield, EN2 8JL Middlesex, UK. abakhai@nhs.net.

ABSTRACT

Background: Long-term management of chronic conditions, such as atrial fibrillation (AF), require frequent interactions with the healthcare systems. The multinational EUropean Patient Survey in Atrial Fibrillation (EUPS-AF) was conducted to investigate patient satisfaction with AF management in different of five European healthcare systems at a time of changing treatment paradigms for stroke prophylaxis, prior to the advent of newer oral anticoagulants.

Methods: Adults (>18 years) were recruited at random from the total populations of France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK using a randomized telephone dialling system. At least 300 respondents per country reporting to have a diagnosis of AF or receiving oral anticoagulation therapy for suspected AF or to have a heart rhythm disturbance completed a structured telephone interview.

Results: Most respondents were satisfied with their treatment for AF over the previous 12 months, with 85.5% (n = 1289) rating their care as good or better. Suboptimal clinical practices, however, were identified in several key areas. Coordination of primary and secondary care and a lack of patient engagement and support were particular issues, especially for those patients likely to have extensive contact with their healthcare system.

Conclusions: In the context of Europe-wide guidelines for management of AF, most patients with AF were satisfied with their care, but for a greater proportion of patients, some aspects are unsatisfactory. Patient-centred surveys, such as the EUPS-AF, are crucial for understanding the factors that contribute to patient satisfaction and compliance with long-term treatment for chronic conditions.

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Patient rating of quality of medical care. (a) Patient rating of quality of medical care received during the previous 12 months and (b) overall rating of quality of care by age and sex. Survey question: Overall, how do you rate the quality of medical care that you have received in the past 12 months?
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Figure 2: Patient rating of quality of medical care. (a) Patient rating of quality of medical care received during the previous 12 months and (b) overall rating of quality of care by age and sex. Survey question: Overall, how do you rate the quality of medical care that you have received in the past 12 months?

Mentions: Participants were asked to rate the quality of care they had received in the previous 12 months using a five-point Likert scale (excellent, very good, good, fair or poor). Overall, 85.5% of respondents (n = 1289) rated the quality of care they had received in the previous 12 months as good, very good, or excellent (range, 71.5 – 91.7% [n = 216 – 275]) (Figure 2a). Respondents in Germany, the UK, and France were more likely to report care that was good, very good, or excellent (Germany, 90.7% [n = 272] of participants; UK, 91.7% [n = 275]; France, 89.7% [n = 269]) than were individuals in Italy or Spain (71.5% [n = 216] and 84.3% [n = 257], respectively). Dissatisfaction with medical care was higher in Italy (26.8% [n = 81] rated care as fair or poor) than in the other four countries surveyed (range, 6.7–14.8% [n = 20–45]).


Patient perspective on the management of atrial fibrillation in five European countries.

Bakhai A, Sandberg A, Mittendorf T, Greiner W, Oberdiek AM, Berto P, Franczok E, Lobban T, Zamorano JL - BMC Cardiovasc Disord (2013)

Patient rating of quality of medical care. (a) Patient rating of quality of medical care received during the previous 12 months and (b) overall rating of quality of care by age and sex. Survey question: Overall, how do you rate the quality of medical care that you have received in the past 12 months?
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219387&req=5

Figure 2: Patient rating of quality of medical care. (a) Patient rating of quality of medical care received during the previous 12 months and (b) overall rating of quality of care by age and sex. Survey question: Overall, how do you rate the quality of medical care that you have received in the past 12 months?
Mentions: Participants were asked to rate the quality of care they had received in the previous 12 months using a five-point Likert scale (excellent, very good, good, fair or poor). Overall, 85.5% of respondents (n = 1289) rated the quality of care they had received in the previous 12 months as good, very good, or excellent (range, 71.5 – 91.7% [n = 216 – 275]) (Figure 2a). Respondents in Germany, the UK, and France were more likely to report care that was good, very good, or excellent (Germany, 90.7% [n = 272] of participants; UK, 91.7% [n = 275]; France, 89.7% [n = 269]) than were individuals in Italy or Spain (71.5% [n = 216] and 84.3% [n = 257], respectively). Dissatisfaction with medical care was higher in Italy (26.8% [n = 81] rated care as fair or poor) than in the other four countries surveyed (range, 6.7–14.8% [n = 20–45]).

Bottom Line: Most respondents were satisfied with their treatment for AF over the previous 12 months, with 85.5% (n = 1289) rating their care as good or better.In the context of Europe-wide guidelines for management of AF, most patients with AF were satisfied with their care, but for a greater proportion of patients, some aspects are unsatisfactory.Patient-centred surveys, such as the EUPS-AF, are crucial for understanding the factors that contribute to patient satisfaction and compliance with long-term treatment for chronic conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust, The Ridgeway, Enfield, EN2 8JL Middlesex, UK. abakhai@nhs.net.

ABSTRACT

Background: Long-term management of chronic conditions, such as atrial fibrillation (AF), require frequent interactions with the healthcare systems. The multinational EUropean Patient Survey in Atrial Fibrillation (EUPS-AF) was conducted to investigate patient satisfaction with AF management in different of five European healthcare systems at a time of changing treatment paradigms for stroke prophylaxis, prior to the advent of newer oral anticoagulants.

Methods: Adults (>18 years) were recruited at random from the total populations of France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK using a randomized telephone dialling system. At least 300 respondents per country reporting to have a diagnosis of AF or receiving oral anticoagulation therapy for suspected AF or to have a heart rhythm disturbance completed a structured telephone interview.

Results: Most respondents were satisfied with their treatment for AF over the previous 12 months, with 85.5% (n = 1289) rating their care as good or better. Suboptimal clinical practices, however, were identified in several key areas. Coordination of primary and secondary care and a lack of patient engagement and support were particular issues, especially for those patients likely to have extensive contact with their healthcare system.

Conclusions: In the context of Europe-wide guidelines for management of AF, most patients with AF were satisfied with their care, but for a greater proportion of patients, some aspects are unsatisfactory. Patient-centred surveys, such as the EUPS-AF, are crucial for understanding the factors that contribute to patient satisfaction and compliance with long-term treatment for chronic conditions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus