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Walk, Look, Remember: The Influence of the Gallery's Spatial Layout on Human Memory for an Art Exhibition.

Krukar J - Behav Sci (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: In the museum context, where spatial layout is one of the most powerful curatorial tools available, attention and memory can be measured as a means of establishing whether or not the gallery fulfils its function as a space for contemplating art.In this exploratory experiment, 32 participants split into two groups explored an experimental, non-public exhibition and completed two unanticipated memory tests afterwards.The results show that some spatial characteristics of an exhibition can inhibit the recall of pictures and shift the focus to perceptual salience of the artworks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Architecture and the Built Environment, Northumbria University, NE1 8ST Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK; E-Mail: jakub.krukar@northumbria.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
The spatial organisation of museums and its influence on the visitor experience has been the subject of numerous studies. Previous research, despite reporting some actual behavioural correlates, rarely had the possibility to investigate the cognitive processes of the art viewers. In the museum context, where spatial layout is one of the most powerful curatorial tools available, attention and memory can be measured as a means of establishing whether or not the gallery fulfils its function as a space for contemplating art. In this exploratory experiment, 32 participants split into two groups explored an experimental, non-public exhibition and completed two unanticipated memory tests afterwards. The results show that some spatial characteristics of an exhibition can inhibit the recall of pictures and shift the focus to perceptual salience of the artworks.

No MeSH data available.


Location-based correlations for Mean Reaction Time and Visibility Catchment Area (VCA). Data points represent locations.
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behavsci-04-00181-f009: Location-based correlations for Mean Reaction Time and Visibility Catchment Area (VCA). Data points represent locations.

Mentions: Another strong negative correlation between VCA and Mean RT scores occurred in Condition 2, meaning that locations with larger Visibility Catchment Areas facilitated faster recognition of pictures seen at those locations. This effect was not present in Condition 1, where VCAs were larger on average. Figure 9 presents the relevant scatter plots.


Walk, Look, Remember: The Influence of the Gallery's Spatial Layout on Human Memory for an Art Exhibition.

Krukar J - Behav Sci (Basel) (2014)

Location-based correlations for Mean Reaction Time and Visibility Catchment Area (VCA). Data points represent locations.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219265&req=5

behavsci-04-00181-f009: Location-based correlations for Mean Reaction Time and Visibility Catchment Area (VCA). Data points represent locations.
Mentions: Another strong negative correlation between VCA and Mean RT scores occurred in Condition 2, meaning that locations with larger Visibility Catchment Areas facilitated faster recognition of pictures seen at those locations. This effect was not present in Condition 1, where VCAs were larger on average. Figure 9 presents the relevant scatter plots.

Bottom Line: In the museum context, where spatial layout is one of the most powerful curatorial tools available, attention and memory can be measured as a means of establishing whether or not the gallery fulfils its function as a space for contemplating art.In this exploratory experiment, 32 participants split into two groups explored an experimental, non-public exhibition and completed two unanticipated memory tests afterwards.The results show that some spatial characteristics of an exhibition can inhibit the recall of pictures and shift the focus to perceptual salience of the artworks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Architecture and the Built Environment, Northumbria University, NE1 8ST Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK; E-Mail: jakub.krukar@northumbria.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
The spatial organisation of museums and its influence on the visitor experience has been the subject of numerous studies. Previous research, despite reporting some actual behavioural correlates, rarely had the possibility to investigate the cognitive processes of the art viewers. In the museum context, where spatial layout is one of the most powerful curatorial tools available, attention and memory can be measured as a means of establishing whether or not the gallery fulfils its function as a space for contemplating art. In this exploratory experiment, 32 participants split into two groups explored an experimental, non-public exhibition and completed two unanticipated memory tests afterwards. The results show that some spatial characteristics of an exhibition can inhibit the recall of pictures and shift the focus to perceptual salience of the artworks.

No MeSH data available.