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Walk, Look, Remember: The Influence of the Gallery's Spatial Layout on Human Memory for an Art Exhibition.

Krukar J - Behav Sci (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: In the museum context, where spatial layout is one of the most powerful curatorial tools available, attention and memory can be measured as a means of establishing whether or not the gallery fulfils its function as a space for contemplating art.In this exploratory experiment, 32 participants split into two groups explored an experimental, non-public exhibition and completed two unanticipated memory tests afterwards.The results show that some spatial characteristics of an exhibition can inhibit the recall of pictures and shift the focus to perceptual salience of the artworks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Architecture and the Built Environment, Northumbria University, NE1 8ST Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK; E-Mail: jakub.krukar@northumbria.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
The spatial organisation of museums and its influence on the visitor experience has been the subject of numerous studies. Previous research, despite reporting some actual behavioural correlates, rarely had the possibility to investigate the cognitive processes of the art viewers. In the museum context, where spatial layout is one of the most powerful curatorial tools available, attention and memory can be measured as a means of establishing whether or not the gallery fulfils its function as a space for contemplating art. In this exploratory experiment, 32 participants split into two groups explored an experimental, non-public exhibition and completed two unanticipated memory tests afterwards. The results show that some spatial characteristics of an exhibition can inhibit the recall of pictures and shift the focus to perceptual salience of the artworks.

No MeSH data available.


Some spatial analyses used in the study: (a) Boundary Visibility Graph (BVG); (b) Visibility Graph Analysis (VGA); (c) Sample isovist derived for location x105; (d) Sample Visibility Catchment Area (VCA), derived for location x105 (equal to its isovist restricted to a 60° cone).
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behavsci-04-00181-f003: Some spatial analyses used in the study: (a) Boundary Visibility Graph (BVG); (b) Visibility Graph Analysis (VGA); (c) Sample isovist derived for location x105; (d) Sample Visibility Catchment Area (VCA), derived for location x105 (equal to its isovist restricted to a 60° cone).

Mentions: For each picture location, two additional, non-standard variables were derived: the number of other pictures present within the isovist of each picture location and its Visibility Catchment Area (VCA). The former indicates a potential co-visibility of other pictures with the analysed picture location (e.g., this number equals 2 for location x104 and 0 for x201). In the art gallery context, pictures’ co-visibility has been shown to influence viewers’ understanding of the exhibition [33]. The latter measure is equivalent to the area of an isovist generated from each location, but restricted by a cone of 60°. This partial isovist generated from the centre of the picture has been suggested for defining the area where viewers wish to position themselves in order to comfortably enjoy the visual experience provided by an artwork [29]. Note that such an area of comfortable viewing is a non-trivial issue and a subject of separate studies [39,40]. Figure 3 presents a visual example of few major analyses.


Walk, Look, Remember: The Influence of the Gallery's Spatial Layout on Human Memory for an Art Exhibition.

Krukar J - Behav Sci (Basel) (2014)

Some spatial analyses used in the study: (a) Boundary Visibility Graph (BVG); (b) Visibility Graph Analysis (VGA); (c) Sample isovist derived for location x105; (d) Sample Visibility Catchment Area (VCA), derived for location x105 (equal to its isovist restricted to a 60° cone).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4219265&req=5

behavsci-04-00181-f003: Some spatial analyses used in the study: (a) Boundary Visibility Graph (BVG); (b) Visibility Graph Analysis (VGA); (c) Sample isovist derived for location x105; (d) Sample Visibility Catchment Area (VCA), derived for location x105 (equal to its isovist restricted to a 60° cone).
Mentions: For each picture location, two additional, non-standard variables were derived: the number of other pictures present within the isovist of each picture location and its Visibility Catchment Area (VCA). The former indicates a potential co-visibility of other pictures with the analysed picture location (e.g., this number equals 2 for location x104 and 0 for x201). In the art gallery context, pictures’ co-visibility has been shown to influence viewers’ understanding of the exhibition [33]. The latter measure is equivalent to the area of an isovist generated from each location, but restricted by a cone of 60°. This partial isovist generated from the centre of the picture has been suggested for defining the area where viewers wish to position themselves in order to comfortably enjoy the visual experience provided by an artwork [29]. Note that such an area of comfortable viewing is a non-trivial issue and a subject of separate studies [39,40]. Figure 3 presents a visual example of few major analyses.

Bottom Line: In the museum context, where spatial layout is one of the most powerful curatorial tools available, attention and memory can be measured as a means of establishing whether or not the gallery fulfils its function as a space for contemplating art.In this exploratory experiment, 32 participants split into two groups explored an experimental, non-public exhibition and completed two unanticipated memory tests afterwards.The results show that some spatial characteristics of an exhibition can inhibit the recall of pictures and shift the focus to perceptual salience of the artworks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Architecture and the Built Environment, Northumbria University, NE1 8ST Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK; E-Mail: jakub.krukar@northumbria.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
The spatial organisation of museums and its influence on the visitor experience has been the subject of numerous studies. Previous research, despite reporting some actual behavioural correlates, rarely had the possibility to investigate the cognitive processes of the art viewers. In the museum context, where spatial layout is one of the most powerful curatorial tools available, attention and memory can be measured as a means of establishing whether or not the gallery fulfils its function as a space for contemplating art. In this exploratory experiment, 32 participants split into two groups explored an experimental, non-public exhibition and completed two unanticipated memory tests afterwards. The results show that some spatial characteristics of an exhibition can inhibit the recall of pictures and shift the focus to perceptual salience of the artworks.

No MeSH data available.