Limits...
Predicting the impacts of climate change on the potential distribution of major native non-food bioenergy plants in China.

Wang W, Tang X, Zhu Q, Pan K, Hu Q, He M, Li J - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The variables of "precipitation of the warmest quarter" and "annual mean temperature" were the most important bioclimatic variables for most of the nine plants according to the MaxEnt modeling results.Global warming in coming decades may result in a decrease in the extent of suitable habitat in the tropics but will have little effect on the total distribution area of each plant.The results indicated that it will be possible to grow these plants on marginal lands within these areas in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Development and Application of Rural Renewable Energy, Biogas Institute of Ministry of Agriculture, Chengdu, 610064, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Planting non-food bioenergy crops on marginal lands is an alternative bioenergy development solution in China. Native non-food bioenergy plants are also considered to be a wise choice to reduce the threat of invasive plants. In this study, the impacts of climate change (a consensus of IPCC scenarios A2a for 2080) on the potential distribution of nine non-food bioenergy plants native to China (viz., Pistacia chinensis, Cornus wilsoniana, Xanthoceras sorbifolia, Vernicia fordii, Sapium sebiferum, Miscanthus sinensis, M. floridulus, M. sacchariflorus and Arundo donax) were analyzed using a MaxEnt species distribution model. The suitable habitats of the nine non-food plants were distributed in the regions east of the Mongolian Plateau and the Tibetan Plateau, where the arable land is primarily used for food production. Thus, the large-scale cultivation of those plants for energy production will have to rely on the marginal lands. The variables of "precipitation of the warmest quarter" and "annual mean temperature" were the most important bioclimatic variables for most of the nine plants according to the MaxEnt modeling results. Global warming in coming decades may result in a decrease in the extent of suitable habitat in the tropics but will have little effect on the total distribution area of each plant. The results indicated that it will be possible to grow these plants on marginal lands within these areas in the future. This work should be beneficial for the domestication and cultivation of those bioenergy plants and should facilitate land-use planning for bioenergy crops in China.

Show MeSH
Predicted current and future (2080) suitable habitats for five woody oil plants (Pistacia chinensis, Cornus wilsoniana, Xanthoceras sorbifolia, Vernicia fordii and Sapium sebiferum).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4218772&req=5

pone-0111587-g001: Predicted current and future (2080) suitable habitats for five woody oil plants (Pistacia chinensis, Cornus wilsoniana, Xanthoceras sorbifolia, Vernicia fordii and Sapium sebiferum).

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the suitable habitats predicted by MaxEnt for the five oil bioenergy plants in China. The main suitable habitats of the five plants, dominated by hills and plains, are distributed in the regions east of the Mongolian Plateau and the Tibetan Plateau. These plants are wildly or semi-wildly distributed on hills or slopes and in mountain forests, open forests or open field (Table 1). With the exception of X. sorbifolia, suitable areas for the plants are mainly found in the south of China, including the Yangtze Plain, the Southeast China Hill, the Sichuan Basin and the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau. In contrast, the suitable habitats of X. sorbifolia are distributed in the north of China, including the Northeast China Plain, the North China Plain and the Loess Plateau. P. chinensis, V. fordii and S. sebiferum are adapted to some parts of the tropics, while the other two oil trees were distributed in the temperate and subtropical regions. Among these five plants, P. chinensis has the widest suitable habitat according to the MaxEnt model's results.


Predicting the impacts of climate change on the potential distribution of major native non-food bioenergy plants in China.

Wang W, Tang X, Zhu Q, Pan K, Hu Q, He M, Li J - PLoS ONE (2014)

Predicted current and future (2080) suitable habitats for five woody oil plants (Pistacia chinensis, Cornus wilsoniana, Xanthoceras sorbifolia, Vernicia fordii and Sapium sebiferum).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4218772&req=5

pone-0111587-g001: Predicted current and future (2080) suitable habitats for five woody oil plants (Pistacia chinensis, Cornus wilsoniana, Xanthoceras sorbifolia, Vernicia fordii and Sapium sebiferum).
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the suitable habitats predicted by MaxEnt for the five oil bioenergy plants in China. The main suitable habitats of the five plants, dominated by hills and plains, are distributed in the regions east of the Mongolian Plateau and the Tibetan Plateau. These plants are wildly or semi-wildly distributed on hills or slopes and in mountain forests, open forests or open field (Table 1). With the exception of X. sorbifolia, suitable areas for the plants are mainly found in the south of China, including the Yangtze Plain, the Southeast China Hill, the Sichuan Basin and the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau. In contrast, the suitable habitats of X. sorbifolia are distributed in the north of China, including the Northeast China Plain, the North China Plain and the Loess Plateau. P. chinensis, V. fordii and S. sebiferum are adapted to some parts of the tropics, while the other two oil trees were distributed in the temperate and subtropical regions. Among these five plants, P. chinensis has the widest suitable habitat according to the MaxEnt model's results.

Bottom Line: The variables of "precipitation of the warmest quarter" and "annual mean temperature" were the most important bioclimatic variables for most of the nine plants according to the MaxEnt modeling results.Global warming in coming decades may result in a decrease in the extent of suitable habitat in the tropics but will have little effect on the total distribution area of each plant.The results indicated that it will be possible to grow these plants on marginal lands within these areas in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Development and Application of Rural Renewable Energy, Biogas Institute of Ministry of Agriculture, Chengdu, 610064, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Planting non-food bioenergy crops on marginal lands is an alternative bioenergy development solution in China. Native non-food bioenergy plants are also considered to be a wise choice to reduce the threat of invasive plants. In this study, the impacts of climate change (a consensus of IPCC scenarios A2a for 2080) on the potential distribution of nine non-food bioenergy plants native to China (viz., Pistacia chinensis, Cornus wilsoniana, Xanthoceras sorbifolia, Vernicia fordii, Sapium sebiferum, Miscanthus sinensis, M. floridulus, M. sacchariflorus and Arundo donax) were analyzed using a MaxEnt species distribution model. The suitable habitats of the nine non-food plants were distributed in the regions east of the Mongolian Plateau and the Tibetan Plateau, where the arable land is primarily used for food production. Thus, the large-scale cultivation of those plants for energy production will have to rely on the marginal lands. The variables of "precipitation of the warmest quarter" and "annual mean temperature" were the most important bioclimatic variables for most of the nine plants according to the MaxEnt modeling results. Global warming in coming decades may result in a decrease in the extent of suitable habitat in the tropics but will have little effect on the total distribution area of each plant. The results indicated that it will be possible to grow these plants on marginal lands within these areas in the future. This work should be beneficial for the domestication and cultivation of those bioenergy plants and should facilitate land-use planning for bioenergy crops in China.

Show MeSH