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Spatial patterns and associations between species belonging to four genera of the Lauraceae family.

Li L, Ye WH, Wei SG, Lian JY, Huang ZL - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Our results suggested that spatial aggregations were common, but the differences between spatial patterns were reduced at the genus level.Aggregation intensity clearly reduced at the genus level.Negative association frequencies decreased at the genus level, such that independent association was commonplace among all four genera.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin, China.

ABSTRACT
Spatial distribution pattern of biological related species present unique opportunities and challenges to explain species coexistence. In this study, we explored the spatial distributions and associations among congeneric species at both the species and genus levels to explain their coexistence through examining the similarities and differences at these two levels. We first used DNA and cluster analysis to confirmed the relative relationship of eight species within a 20 ha subtropical forest in southern China. We compared Diameter at breast height (DBH) classes, aggregation intensities and spatial patterns, associations, and distributions of four closely related species pairs to reveal similarities and differences at the species and genus levels. These comparisons provided insight into the mechanisms of coexistence of these congeners. O-ring statistics were used to measure spatial patterns of species. Ω0-10, the mean conspecific density within 10 m of a tree, was used as a measure of the intensity of aggregation of a species, and g-function was used to analyze spatial associations. Our results suggested that spatial aggregations were common, but the differences between spatial patterns were reduced at the genus level. Aggregation intensity clearly reduced at the genus level. Negative association frequencies decreased at the genus level, such that independent association was commonplace among all four genera. Relationships between more closely related species appeared to be more competitive at both the species and genus levels. The importance of competition on interactions is most likely influenced by similarity in lifestyle, and the habitat diversity within the species' distribution areas. Relatives with different lifestyles likely produce different distribution patterns through different interaction process. In order to fully understand the mechanisms generating spatial distributions of coexisting siblings, further research is required to determine the spatial patterns and associations at other classification levels.

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Spatial patterns of the four genera of Lauraceae species.The solid line curve is the Ωr value. Dashed lines correspond to the confidence intervals generated from 999 Monte Carlo simulations under the  hypothesis of complete spatial randomness.
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pone-0111500-g005: Spatial patterns of the four genera of Lauraceae species.The solid line curve is the Ωr value. Dashed lines correspond to the confidence intervals generated from 999 Monte Carlo simulations under the hypothesis of complete spatial randomness.

Mentions: When examined at the genera level, the differences in spatial patterns were reduced. The four genera showed similar tendencies (Fig. 5). Aggregation patterns were at small and middle scales (Cryptocarya<200 m, Lindera<220 m, Machilus<160 m and Neolitsea<180 m), then random and then regular at larger scales, corresponding to their spatial pattern in the plot (Fig. 5).


Spatial patterns and associations between species belonging to four genera of the Lauraceae family.

Li L, Ye WH, Wei SG, Lian JY, Huang ZL - PLoS ONE (2014)

Spatial patterns of the four genera of Lauraceae species.The solid line curve is the Ωr value. Dashed lines correspond to the confidence intervals generated from 999 Monte Carlo simulations under the  hypothesis of complete spatial randomness.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4218757&req=5

pone-0111500-g005: Spatial patterns of the four genera of Lauraceae species.The solid line curve is the Ωr value. Dashed lines correspond to the confidence intervals generated from 999 Monte Carlo simulations under the hypothesis of complete spatial randomness.
Mentions: When examined at the genera level, the differences in spatial patterns were reduced. The four genera showed similar tendencies (Fig. 5). Aggregation patterns were at small and middle scales (Cryptocarya<200 m, Lindera<220 m, Machilus<160 m and Neolitsea<180 m), then random and then regular at larger scales, corresponding to their spatial pattern in the plot (Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: Our results suggested that spatial aggregations were common, but the differences between spatial patterns were reduced at the genus level.Aggregation intensity clearly reduced at the genus level.Negative association frequencies decreased at the genus level, such that independent association was commonplace among all four genera.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin, China.

ABSTRACT
Spatial distribution pattern of biological related species present unique opportunities and challenges to explain species coexistence. In this study, we explored the spatial distributions and associations among congeneric species at both the species and genus levels to explain their coexistence through examining the similarities and differences at these two levels. We first used DNA and cluster analysis to confirmed the relative relationship of eight species within a 20 ha subtropical forest in southern China. We compared Diameter at breast height (DBH) classes, aggregation intensities and spatial patterns, associations, and distributions of four closely related species pairs to reveal similarities and differences at the species and genus levels. These comparisons provided insight into the mechanisms of coexistence of these congeners. O-ring statistics were used to measure spatial patterns of species. Ω0-10, the mean conspecific density within 10 m of a tree, was used as a measure of the intensity of aggregation of a species, and g-function was used to analyze spatial associations. Our results suggested that spatial aggregations were common, but the differences between spatial patterns were reduced at the genus level. Aggregation intensity clearly reduced at the genus level. Negative association frequencies decreased at the genus level, such that independent association was commonplace among all four genera. Relationships between more closely related species appeared to be more competitive at both the species and genus levels. The importance of competition on interactions is most likely influenced by similarity in lifestyle, and the habitat diversity within the species' distribution areas. Relatives with different lifestyles likely produce different distribution patterns through different interaction process. In order to fully understand the mechanisms generating spatial distributions of coexisting siblings, further research is required to determine the spatial patterns and associations at other classification levels.

Show MeSH