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Levels of circulating TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in celiac disease.

Celeghini C, Not T, Norcio A, Monasta L, Secchiero P - Exp Ther Med (2014)

Bottom Line: It has previously been demonstrated that the circulating levels of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) are significantly lower in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) than in normal age- and gender-matched controls.Patients with CD associated with other auto-immune diseases showed significantly lower levels of TRAIL when compared with patients with CD alone.Thus, although T1D and CD share common immunological features, the circulating levels of TRAIL show a significant difference between the two pathologies, and do not appear to be modulated in CD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste I-34138, Italy.

ABSTRACT
It has previously been demonstrated that the circulating levels of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) are significantly lower in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) than in normal age- and gender-matched controls. Since celiac disease (CD) is often associated with T1D, a retrospective study was performed to analyze the sera of a cohort of pediatric subjects: i) patients with CD at onset (n=100); ii) patients with potential CD (n=45); iii) patients with CD associated with other auto-immune diseases (n=17); and iv) patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (n=15). Among the patients with CD, 49 were also analyzed after six months on a gluten-free diet, while data were also available for 13 patients after one year on a gluten-free diet. No significant differences were found in the circulating levels of TRAIL between the patients with CD and the patients with either eosinophilic esophagitis or potential CD. Patients with CD associated with other auto-immune diseases showed significantly lower levels of TRAIL when compared with patients with CD alone. The gluten-free diet did not significantly modify the levels of circulating TRAIL at 6 or 12 months. Thus, although T1D and CD share common immunological features, the circulating levels of TRAIL show a significant difference between the two pathologies, and do not appear to be modulated in CD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Levels of circulating TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in patients with different pathologies. CD, celiac disease.
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f1-etm-08-06-1906: Levels of circulating TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in patients with different pathologies. CD, celiac disease.

Mentions: As mentioned in Materials and methods, the cohort of individuals analyzed in the present study included: 100 patients with CD at onset, 45 patients with potential CD, 17 patients with CD associated with another autoimmunity, and 15 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (Table I). No significant differences among the groups were observed in relation to the male to female ratio and no significant correlation was observed between serum TRAIL levels and the age of the patients. The circulating levels of TRAIL assessed in patients with CD were not significantly different when compared with those in patients with potential CD, nor when compared with those in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (Table I, Fig. 1). Notably, the analysis of TRAIL levels between patients with CD with and without other concomitant autoimmune disorders (T1D, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Addison’s disease, vitiligo, autoimmune atrophic gastritis and psoriasis) revealed significantly lower levels in patients with other autoimmune disorders (P=0.047). This suggests that the concomitant presence of other autoimmune diseases impacts on the circulating levels of TRAIL in CD.


Levels of circulating TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in celiac disease.

Celeghini C, Not T, Norcio A, Monasta L, Secchiero P - Exp Ther Med (2014)

Levels of circulating TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in patients with different pathologies. CD, celiac disease.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4218685&req=5

f1-etm-08-06-1906: Levels of circulating TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in patients with different pathologies. CD, celiac disease.
Mentions: As mentioned in Materials and methods, the cohort of individuals analyzed in the present study included: 100 patients with CD at onset, 45 patients with potential CD, 17 patients with CD associated with another autoimmunity, and 15 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (Table I). No significant differences among the groups were observed in relation to the male to female ratio and no significant correlation was observed between serum TRAIL levels and the age of the patients. The circulating levels of TRAIL assessed in patients with CD were not significantly different when compared with those in patients with potential CD, nor when compared with those in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (Table I, Fig. 1). Notably, the analysis of TRAIL levels between patients with CD with and without other concomitant autoimmune disorders (T1D, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Addison’s disease, vitiligo, autoimmune atrophic gastritis and psoriasis) revealed significantly lower levels in patients with other autoimmune disorders (P=0.047). This suggests that the concomitant presence of other autoimmune diseases impacts on the circulating levels of TRAIL in CD.

Bottom Line: It has previously been demonstrated that the circulating levels of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) are significantly lower in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) than in normal age- and gender-matched controls.Patients with CD associated with other auto-immune diseases showed significantly lower levels of TRAIL when compared with patients with CD alone.Thus, although T1D and CD share common immunological features, the circulating levels of TRAIL show a significant difference between the two pathologies, and do not appear to be modulated in CD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste I-34138, Italy.

ABSTRACT
It has previously been demonstrated that the circulating levels of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) are significantly lower in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) than in normal age- and gender-matched controls. Since celiac disease (CD) is often associated with T1D, a retrospective study was performed to analyze the sera of a cohort of pediatric subjects: i) patients with CD at onset (n=100); ii) patients with potential CD (n=45); iii) patients with CD associated with other auto-immune diseases (n=17); and iv) patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (n=15). Among the patients with CD, 49 were also analyzed after six months on a gluten-free diet, while data were also available for 13 patients after one year on a gluten-free diet. No significant differences were found in the circulating levels of TRAIL between the patients with CD and the patients with either eosinophilic esophagitis or potential CD. Patients with CD associated with other auto-immune diseases showed significantly lower levels of TRAIL when compared with patients with CD alone. The gluten-free diet did not significantly modify the levels of circulating TRAIL at 6 or 12 months. Thus, although T1D and CD share common immunological features, the circulating levels of TRAIL show a significant difference between the two pathologies, and do not appear to be modulated in CD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus