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Mild hypothermia in combination with minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma reduces inflammatory damage in patients via the nuclear factor-κB pathway.

Bi Y, Huan Y, Cai W, Wang X, Liang Z, Liu Z, Duan R - Exp Ther Med (2014)

Bottom Line: NIHSS scores in the MHMIHE group were significantly lower than those in the MIHE group on days three and seven.TNF-α and NF-κB levels peaked on day three, and the MHMIHE group had significantly lower levels of TNF-α and NF-κB than the MIHE group.In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that mild hypothermia and minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma can effectively reduce inflammation and improve the brain function of patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Emergency, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250014, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mild hypothermia and minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma on the brain function of patients with cerebral hemorrhage. Seventy-six patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage were divided into the minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma (MIHE) and mild hypothermia and minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma (MHMIHE) groups. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores on the day of admission of the patient and one, three and seven days after the procedure were recorded. Perihematoma brain tissue morphology was observed using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level was detected by ELISA. NIHSS scores in the MHMIHE group were significantly lower than those in the MIHE group on days three and seven. TNF-α and NF-κB levels peaked on day three, and the MHMIHE group had significantly lower levels of TNF-α and NF-κB than the MIHE group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that mild hypothermia and minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma can effectively reduce inflammation and improve the brain function of patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Brain CT film results of patients treated with (A–D) minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma 3 h after the onset, and (E–H) minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma and subsequent mild hypothermia 2 h after the onset. Brain CT film was obtained at (A) 3 h after the onset; (B) 1 day after surgery; (C) 3 days after surgery; (D) 7 days after surgery; (E) 2 h after the onset; (F) 1 day after surgery; (G) 3 days after surgery; and (H) 7 days after surgery. CT, computed tomography.
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f3-etm-08-06-1717: Brain CT film results of patients treated with (A–D) minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma 3 h after the onset, and (E–H) minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma and subsequent mild hypothermia 2 h after the onset. Brain CT film was obtained at (A) 3 h after the onset; (B) 1 day after surgery; (C) 3 days after surgery; (D) 7 days after surgery; (E) 2 h after the onset; (F) 1 day after surgery; (G) 3 days after surgery; and (H) 7 days after surgery. CT, computed tomography.

Mentions: To compare the effects of the two types of treatments on the two groups of patients with cerebral hemorrhage, the brains of the patients were examined by CT on days 1, 3 and 7. As shown in the brain CT film (Fig. 3) on admission and following surgery, lateral ventricle and local hematoma was significantly reduced on the first day after surgery, and this change became more significant on the seventh day after surgery. These results suggested that mild hypothermia and minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma effectively alleviated cerebral hemorrhage and improved brain function.


Mild hypothermia in combination with minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma reduces inflammatory damage in patients via the nuclear factor-κB pathway.

Bi Y, Huan Y, Cai W, Wang X, Liang Z, Liu Z, Duan R - Exp Ther Med (2014)

Brain CT film results of patients treated with (A–D) minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma 3 h after the onset, and (E–H) minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma and subsequent mild hypothermia 2 h after the onset. Brain CT film was obtained at (A) 3 h after the onset; (B) 1 day after surgery; (C) 3 days after surgery; (D) 7 days after surgery; (E) 2 h after the onset; (F) 1 day after surgery; (G) 3 days after surgery; and (H) 7 days after surgery. CT, computed tomography.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4217783&req=5

f3-etm-08-06-1717: Brain CT film results of patients treated with (A–D) minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma 3 h after the onset, and (E–H) minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma and subsequent mild hypothermia 2 h after the onset. Brain CT film was obtained at (A) 3 h after the onset; (B) 1 day after surgery; (C) 3 days after surgery; (D) 7 days after surgery; (E) 2 h after the onset; (F) 1 day after surgery; (G) 3 days after surgery; and (H) 7 days after surgery. CT, computed tomography.
Mentions: To compare the effects of the two types of treatments on the two groups of patients with cerebral hemorrhage, the brains of the patients were examined by CT on days 1, 3 and 7. As shown in the brain CT film (Fig. 3) on admission and following surgery, lateral ventricle and local hematoma was significantly reduced on the first day after surgery, and this change became more significant on the seventh day after surgery. These results suggested that mild hypothermia and minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma effectively alleviated cerebral hemorrhage and improved brain function.

Bottom Line: NIHSS scores in the MHMIHE group were significantly lower than those in the MIHE group on days three and seven.TNF-α and NF-κB levels peaked on day three, and the MHMIHE group had significantly lower levels of TNF-α and NF-κB than the MIHE group.In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that mild hypothermia and minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma can effectively reduce inflammation and improve the brain function of patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Emergency, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250014, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mild hypothermia and minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma on the brain function of patients with cerebral hemorrhage. Seventy-six patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage were divided into the minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma (MIHE) and mild hypothermia and minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma (MHMIHE) groups. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores on the day of admission of the patient and one, three and seven days after the procedure were recorded. Perihematoma brain tissue morphology was observed using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level was detected by ELISA. NIHSS scores in the MHMIHE group were significantly lower than those in the MIHE group on days three and seven. TNF-α and NF-κB levels peaked on day three, and the MHMIHE group had significantly lower levels of TNF-α and NF-κB than the MIHE group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that mild hypothermia and minimally invasive evacuation of hematoma can effectively reduce inflammation and improve the brain function of patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus