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A secure operational model for mobile payments.

Chang TK - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Bottom Line: A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate.This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only.The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Instead of paying by cash, check, or credit cards, customers can now also use their mobile devices to pay for a wide range of services and both digital and physical goods. However, customers' security concerns are a major barrier to the broad adoption and use of mobile payments. In this paper we present the design of a secure operational model for mobile payments in which access control is based on a service-oriented architecture. A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate. This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only. The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service.

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The process of securing an XML document.
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fig5: The process of securing an XML document.

Mentions: Figure 5 illustrates the relationship between XML, DSL, and the DSL securing tool. Figure 5(a) shows the process of encrypting and embedding digital signatures. The encryption and digital signature details are stored in a DSL document in DP, DT, and DSig: DP is the security pattern definition that specifies the combination of security algorithms and encryption and decryption keys, DT is the transformation description definition that specifies the actual data transformation of element-wise encryption, and DSig specifies how to embed digital signatures in the resulting XML document. The target XML document that is ready to be encrypted and signed is X. The DSL securing tool reads, parses, analyzes DP, DT, DSig, and X, and then generates Xs and DP′. Xs is still an XML document, but some of its elements contain ciphertexts that are translated by the DSL securing tool according to the encryption details recorded in DP and DT. In addition to the encrypted elements, Xs also contains signatures that are embedded by the DSL securing tool. Each signature signs a portion of the data in X. It should be noted that DP and DP′ may actually contain different information: DP holds information describing how to encrypt X, whereas DP′ should include details of how to decrypt Xs. Algorithm 1 is an example of a DSL document whose details are shown in [13].


A secure operational model for mobile payments.

Chang TK - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

The process of securing an XML document.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4217240&req=5

fig5: The process of securing an XML document.
Mentions: Figure 5 illustrates the relationship between XML, DSL, and the DSL securing tool. Figure 5(a) shows the process of encrypting and embedding digital signatures. The encryption and digital signature details are stored in a DSL document in DP, DT, and DSig: DP is the security pattern definition that specifies the combination of security algorithms and encryption and decryption keys, DT is the transformation description definition that specifies the actual data transformation of element-wise encryption, and DSig specifies how to embed digital signatures in the resulting XML document. The target XML document that is ready to be encrypted and signed is X. The DSL securing tool reads, parses, analyzes DP, DT, DSig, and X, and then generates Xs and DP′. Xs is still an XML document, but some of its elements contain ciphertexts that are translated by the DSL securing tool according to the encryption details recorded in DP and DT. In addition to the encrypted elements, Xs also contains signatures that are embedded by the DSL securing tool. Each signature signs a portion of the data in X. It should be noted that DP and DP′ may actually contain different information: DP holds information describing how to encrypt X, whereas DP′ should include details of how to decrypt Xs. Algorithm 1 is an example of a DSL document whose details are shown in [13].

Bottom Line: A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate.This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only.The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Instead of paying by cash, check, or credit cards, customers can now also use their mobile devices to pay for a wide range of services and both digital and physical goods. However, customers' security concerns are a major barrier to the broad adoption and use of mobile payments. In this paper we present the design of a secure operational model for mobile payments in which access control is based on a service-oriented architecture. A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate. This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only. The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service.

Show MeSH