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Evaluating Midwifery Units (EMU): a prospective cohort study of freestanding midwifery units in New South Wales, Australia.

Monk A, Tracy M, Foureur M, Grigg C, Tracy S - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Women who planned to give birth at a freestanding midwifery unit were significantly more likely to have a spontaneous vaginal birth (AOR 1.57; 95% CI 1.20 to 2.06) and significantly less likely to have a caesarean section (AOR 0.65; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.88).Analysis of secondary outcomes indicated that planning to give birth in a freestanding midwifery unit was associated with similar or reduced odds of intrapartum interventions and similar or improved odds of indicators of neonatal well-being.The results of this study support the provision of care in freestanding midwifery units as an alternative to tertiary-level maternity units for women with low risk pregnancies at the time of booking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Study population and transfers from freestanding midwifery units (FMU) to tertiary level maternity unit (TMU). Percentages expressed by planned place of birth.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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BMJOPEN2014006252F1: Study population and transfers from freestanding midwifery units (FMU) to tertiary level maternity unit (TMU). Percentages expressed by planned place of birth.

Mentions: Data were obtained for all 3651 eligible women identified. In total, 494 planned to give birth at a freestanding midwifery unit and 3157 planned to give birth at a tertiary-level maternity unit (figure 1). Of the 494 women who planned to give birth at the freestanding midwifery unit 238 women (48.2%) gave birth at a tertiary-level maternity unit, 244 women (49.4%) gave birth at the freestanding midwifery unit as planned, and a further 12 (2.4%) gave birth before admission to the freestanding midwifery unit. Of the 494 women who planned to give birth in a freestanding midwifery unit, 256 (51.8%) transferred to a tertiary-level maternity unit (34% antenatal, 13.2% intrapartum, 3.6% postnatal and 1% unknown stage of transfer). The majority of women who planned to give birth at a tertiary-level maternity unit actually gave birth there (98%), with 28 women (0.9%) giving birth before arriving. Thirty-four women (1.1%) who intended to give birth at a tertiary-level maternity unit actually gave birth at a freestanding midwifery unit, and four of these women transferred to a tertiary-level maternity unit postnatally.


Evaluating Midwifery Units (EMU): a prospective cohort study of freestanding midwifery units in New South Wales, Australia.

Monk A, Tracy M, Foureur M, Grigg C, Tracy S - BMJ Open (2014)

Study population and transfers from freestanding midwifery units (FMU) to tertiary level maternity unit (TMU). Percentages expressed by planned place of birth.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4216868&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006252F1: Study population and transfers from freestanding midwifery units (FMU) to tertiary level maternity unit (TMU). Percentages expressed by planned place of birth.
Mentions: Data were obtained for all 3651 eligible women identified. In total, 494 planned to give birth at a freestanding midwifery unit and 3157 planned to give birth at a tertiary-level maternity unit (figure 1). Of the 494 women who planned to give birth at the freestanding midwifery unit 238 women (48.2%) gave birth at a tertiary-level maternity unit, 244 women (49.4%) gave birth at the freestanding midwifery unit as planned, and a further 12 (2.4%) gave birth before admission to the freestanding midwifery unit. Of the 494 women who planned to give birth in a freestanding midwifery unit, 256 (51.8%) transferred to a tertiary-level maternity unit (34% antenatal, 13.2% intrapartum, 3.6% postnatal and 1% unknown stage of transfer). The majority of women who planned to give birth at a tertiary-level maternity unit actually gave birth there (98%), with 28 women (0.9%) giving birth before arriving. Thirty-four women (1.1%) who intended to give birth at a tertiary-level maternity unit actually gave birth at a freestanding midwifery unit, and four of these women transferred to a tertiary-level maternity unit postnatally.

Bottom Line: Women who planned to give birth at a freestanding midwifery unit were significantly more likely to have a spontaneous vaginal birth (AOR 1.57; 95% CI 1.20 to 2.06) and significantly less likely to have a caesarean section (AOR 0.65; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.88).Analysis of secondary outcomes indicated that planning to give birth in a freestanding midwifery unit was associated with similar or reduced odds of intrapartum interventions and similar or improved odds of indicators of neonatal well-being.The results of this study support the provision of care in freestanding midwifery units as an alternative to tertiary-level maternity units for women with low risk pregnancies at the time of booking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus