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Oxidative status imbalance in patients with metabolic syndrome: role of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis.

da Fonseca LJ, Nunes-Souza V, Guedes Gda S, Schettino-Silva G, Mota-Gomes MA, Rabelo LA - Oxid Med Cell Longev (2014)

Bottom Line: Linear regression analysis revealed a positive and significant correlation between lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase and also between this enzyme and hydrogen peroxide.In contrast, such correlation was not observed between lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide.In summary, Metabolic Syndrome patients exhibited evident systemic redox imbalance compared to controls, with the possible participation of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis as a contributor in lipid peroxidation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Reatividade Cardiovascular, Setor de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde (ICBS), Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Avenida Lourival Melo Mota, s/n, Cidade Universitária, 57072-900 Maceió, AL, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The present study evaluated the cardiometabolic and redox balance profiles in patients with Metabolic Syndrome compared to apparently healthy individuals, and the participation of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis in systemic lipid peroxidation. Twenty-four patients with Metabolic Syndrome and eighteen controls underwent a full clinical assessment. Venous blood samples were collected for general biochemical dosages, as well as for the oxidative stress analyses (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and arginase activities; and lipid peroxidation, myeloperoxidase activity, nitrite, and hydrogen peroxide concentrations in plasma). Arterial stiffness was assessed by radial artery applanation tonometry. Plasma lipid peroxidation, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity, myeloperoxidase activity, and hydrogen peroxide concentrations were shown to be increased in Metabolic Syndrome patients, without significant differences for the other enzymes, plasma nitrite concentrations, and arterial stiffness. Linear regression analysis revealed a positive and significant correlation between lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase and also between this enzyme and hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, such correlation was not observed between lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide. In summary, Metabolic Syndrome patients exhibited evident systemic redox imbalance compared to controls, with the possible participation of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis as a contributor in lipid peroxidation.

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(a) Plasma hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations, (b) myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and (c) lipid peroxidation (MDA: malondialdehyde) in patients with Metabolic Syndrome (MetS; n = 24) and controls (n = 18). Student's t-test for H2O2 and MPO. Mann-Whitney U test for lipid peroxidation. **P < 0.01; ***P < 0.0001.
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fig4: (a) Plasma hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations, (b) myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and (c) lipid peroxidation (MDA: malondialdehyde) in patients with Metabolic Syndrome (MetS; n = 24) and controls (n = 18). Student's t-test for H2O2 and MPO. Mann-Whitney U test for lipid peroxidation. **P < 0.01; ***P < 0.0001.

Mentions: The analysis of H2O2 in plasma evidenced higher concentrations in patients with MetS compared to the controls (Figure 4(a)). In the same direction of the observation for H2O2 concentrations, MPO activity in plasma was found to be increased in MetS individuals (Figure 4(b)). The assessment of lipid peroxidation in plasma showed a greater state of systemic redox imbalance in MetS patients, as observed by the increased MDA concentrations in such group compared to the controls (Figure 4(c)). Linear regression analyses revealed positive and significant correlations between two MetS components (WC and fasting glucose) and MPO (Figures 5(f) and 5(g), resp.) and also between fasting insulin and MPO (Figure 5(h)). For the other MetS components and LDL-c, no significant correlations were observed with MPO (Figures 5(a)–5(e)). For the oxidative stress markers MDA, MPO, and H2O2, significant correlations were found between MDA and MPO and also between MPO and H2O2 but not between MDA and H2O2 (Figure 6).


Oxidative status imbalance in patients with metabolic syndrome: role of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis.

da Fonseca LJ, Nunes-Souza V, Guedes Gda S, Schettino-Silva G, Mota-Gomes MA, Rabelo LA - Oxid Med Cell Longev (2014)

(a) Plasma hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations, (b) myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and (c) lipid peroxidation (MDA: malondialdehyde) in patients with Metabolic Syndrome (MetS; n = 24) and controls (n = 18). Student's t-test for H2O2 and MPO. Mann-Whitney U test for lipid peroxidation. **P < 0.01; ***P < 0.0001.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4216703&req=5

fig4: (a) Plasma hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations, (b) myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and (c) lipid peroxidation (MDA: malondialdehyde) in patients with Metabolic Syndrome (MetS; n = 24) and controls (n = 18). Student's t-test for H2O2 and MPO. Mann-Whitney U test for lipid peroxidation. **P < 0.01; ***P < 0.0001.
Mentions: The analysis of H2O2 in plasma evidenced higher concentrations in patients with MetS compared to the controls (Figure 4(a)). In the same direction of the observation for H2O2 concentrations, MPO activity in plasma was found to be increased in MetS individuals (Figure 4(b)). The assessment of lipid peroxidation in plasma showed a greater state of systemic redox imbalance in MetS patients, as observed by the increased MDA concentrations in such group compared to the controls (Figure 4(c)). Linear regression analyses revealed positive and significant correlations between two MetS components (WC and fasting glucose) and MPO (Figures 5(f) and 5(g), resp.) and also between fasting insulin and MPO (Figure 5(h)). For the other MetS components and LDL-c, no significant correlations were observed with MPO (Figures 5(a)–5(e)). For the oxidative stress markers MDA, MPO, and H2O2, significant correlations were found between MDA and MPO and also between MPO and H2O2 but not between MDA and H2O2 (Figure 6).

Bottom Line: Linear regression analysis revealed a positive and significant correlation between lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase and also between this enzyme and hydrogen peroxide.In contrast, such correlation was not observed between lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide.In summary, Metabolic Syndrome patients exhibited evident systemic redox imbalance compared to controls, with the possible participation of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis as a contributor in lipid peroxidation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Reatividade Cardiovascular, Setor de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde (ICBS), Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Avenida Lourival Melo Mota, s/n, Cidade Universitária, 57072-900 Maceió, AL, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The present study evaluated the cardiometabolic and redox balance profiles in patients with Metabolic Syndrome compared to apparently healthy individuals, and the participation of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis in systemic lipid peroxidation. Twenty-four patients with Metabolic Syndrome and eighteen controls underwent a full clinical assessment. Venous blood samples were collected for general biochemical dosages, as well as for the oxidative stress analyses (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and arginase activities; and lipid peroxidation, myeloperoxidase activity, nitrite, and hydrogen peroxide concentrations in plasma). Arterial stiffness was assessed by radial artery applanation tonometry. Plasma lipid peroxidation, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity, myeloperoxidase activity, and hydrogen peroxide concentrations were shown to be increased in Metabolic Syndrome patients, without significant differences for the other enzymes, plasma nitrite concentrations, and arterial stiffness. Linear regression analysis revealed a positive and significant correlation between lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase and also between this enzyme and hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, such correlation was not observed between lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide. In summary, Metabolic Syndrome patients exhibited evident systemic redox imbalance compared to controls, with the possible participation of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis as a contributor in lipid peroxidation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus